LSU in the News

 

Inside Higher Education: SEC universities all receive highest research designation from top commission

The 14 member universities of the Southeastern Conference possess large and varied research portfolios comprising agricultural advances, medical discoveries, and technological breakthroughs. Though diverse, these wide-ranging accomplishments have placed the league under one very important, research-themed banner, SEC officials say.

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NBC News: Global warming will cause the world's oceans to change color. Here's why.

The world’s oceans are warming and growing more acidic as a result of climate change, and a provocative new study suggests they’ll be changing color too.

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CNN: No, Saints fans, you CAN'T change national TV ratings by boycotting the Super Bowl. But we know you'll try

No, Saints fans, you CAN'T change national TV ratings by boycotting the Super Bowl. But we know you'll try

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CNBC: Tariffs force tough choices in Louisiana as farmers leave soybeans in fields to rot

"The effects to this point in Louisiana are perhaps a bit more acute and recognizable, given the size of the state's economy and the types of industries we're talking about being impacted here," says Stephen Barnes, director of the LSU Economics & Policy Research Group.

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New York Times: Stuck and Stressed: The Health Costs of Traffic

The physical and psychological toll of brutal commutes can be considerable.

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WSJ: Cold Pursuits: A Scientist's Quest to Uncover Antarctica's Secrets

For three decades scientist Peter Doran has collected environmental data in Antarctica. This year he is leading a project that uses aerial sensors to probe beneath the surface of vast glaciers.

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Pacific Standard: How to Increase Trust in the Media

Some journalists are reluctant to speak up in defense of their profession. One school of thought argues that responding to attacks from President Donald Trump, who regularly calls the media "the enemy of the people," risks making reporters look like advocates. Better, they argue, just to do good work.

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