LSU in the News

 

El Mundo: "With gravitational waves we are listening to the Universe"

Gabriela González (1965) is an Argentine physicist who works as a spokesperson for the LIGO project , which stands for the Observatory of Gravitational Wave Laser Interferometry, which is located in the United States. It is a great research plan that began in 1984 and in which several countries participate to detect the waves predicted by Einstein in his Theory of General Relativity, the perturbations of space-time produced by a massive accelerated body. The study, which is developed from two subprojects (LIGO in the US and Virgo in Europe), announced in 2016 the first confirmation of these undulations, which earned him the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics for Americans Rainer Weiss, Barry Barish and Kip Thorne.

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CNBC: Rising Risks - Baton Rouge emerges from devastating floods to lead the battle against rising water

In August 2016, a massive rain storm stalled over Louisiana, dumping nearly 30 inches of rain across the Baton Rouge area.

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Cosmos: Dust to dust - The mystery of Tabby’s star deepens

Astronomers using small telescopes around the world are unearthing clues to an enigma once dubbed “the most mysterious star in the galaxy.” The star’s official name is KIC 8462852, but it is better known as Tabby’s star in honour of its discoverer, Tabetha Boyajian, now a professor at Louisiana State University. Tabby’s star is bright enough to appear on many star photos, but it was only in recently, after it happened to be in the field of view of the Kepler space telescope, that it came to prominence.

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Discover: A Mighty Model - Big science does the Big River justice

In a cavernous building in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, just steps from the Mississippi River, environmental engineer Clint Willson lifts a beaker filled with dark plastic crumbs. They look like black lava salt, but in this room, the granules are a stand-in for river sediment. The tiny particles are an essential part of the massive Lower Mississippi River Physical Model: a working, flowing simulation of the river.

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Science Daily: Gulf of Mexico 'dead zone' forecasted to exceed the size of Connecticut

Scientists have predicted the dead zone, or area with little to no oxygen in the northern Gulf of Mexico, will become larger than the state of Connecticut by the end of July, according to a new report. While there are more than 500 dead zones around the world, the northern Gulf of Mexico dead zone is the second largest human-caused coastal hypoxic area in the world.

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CBS News: Evolution gone weird: Lizards in New Guinea bleed lime green

For some lizards it's easy being green. It's in their blood. Six species of lizards in New Guinea bleed lime green thanks to evolution gone weird.

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LSU professor lands $900K grant for science and engineering work; Scientists Predict Average Dead Zone, but 3x Long-Term Goal; LSU honors Donna Britt inside Tiger Stadium

June 7, 2018

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