LSU in the News

 

Daily Express: Maya breakthrough as incredible underwater find solves 1,000-year-old mystery

Heather McKillop, along with her research team from LSU, excavated the salt kitchens where brine was boiled in clay pots over fires in pole and thatch buildings. The Maya constructed stone temples and palaces in the rainforest all across Central America and had stunning stone carvings of their royal leaders.

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CNN: First ancient fossil of Homo naledi child found in the Cradle of Humankind

For hundreds of thousands of years, the fossil of a small child has been hidden in the darkness of South Africa's Rising Star cave. The skull, from a child that was 4 to 6 years old at the time of death, is the first known to belong to an ancient human relative called Homo naledi.

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NBC: How we clean oil spills hasn't changed in decades. These scientists want to change that.

More than a decade after the biggest oil spill in U.S. history, and as the Coast Guard works to contain a new disaster off the coast of Southern California, experts say surprisingly little has changed in how oil spills are cleaned up.

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Forbes: At Festi-Ful, Chef Jet Tila Helps Students At 300 Colleges Celebrate Togetherness

When Food Network chef Jet Tila was in his twenties, he paid the bills by working in college foodservice. Specifically, he worked for Compass Group, the parent company of Chartwells Higher Education, which provides dining services at schools across the country.

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The Wall Street Journal: Biden to Meet With Top Executives on Covid-19 Vaccine Mandate

President Biden is expected to meet Wednesday with executives from companies including Walt Disney Co. , Microsoft Corp. and Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc. to advance his Covid-19 vaccination requirements for the private sector.

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Houston Chronicle: These LSU engineering students built a robot arm that can help farmers harvest crawfish

It may not be long before our beloved crawfish are handled by robots before they meet the pot.

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USA Today: There's a 'dead zone' in the Gulf of Mexico this summer that's bigger than Connecticut

The annual Gulf of Mexico "dead zone" – a region of oxygen-depleted water off Louisiana and Texas that's harmful to sea life – is larger than average this summer, federal scientists from NOAA announced in a report out Tuesday.

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