News Releases

LSU Reilly Center Event to Explore Educational Inequity, Feature A.P. Tureaud Jr.

BATON ROUGE--"The Great Equalizer? How Policy Cemented Educational Inequity" will discuss how landmark Supreme Court rulings in the Plessy v. Ferguson and, subsequently, Brown v. Board of Education cases continue to shape the values of the American education system. Join the discussion on Tuesday, Oct. 26, at 3:30 p.m. CT by registering on Eventbrite.

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Experts to Explore Role of Media, Technology as Supportive Tools in Domestic Violence Situations in LSU Reilly Center Roundtable

BATON ROUGE-The Reilly Center for Media & Public Affairs at LSU's Manship School of Mass Communication, in partnership with the LSU Women's Center and the Lighthouse Program, will host Supporting Survivors: The Role of Media and Technology, a roundtable discussion focused on understanding the role media and technology play in domestic violence situations. The event will be held Wednesday, Oct. 13, at 1:30 p.m. CT in alignment with October's Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

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Louisiana Changemakers Awarded LSU Reilly Center Grants to Move Forward with Community Collaborative Projects

BATON ROUGE--Four Louisiana public projects were awarded $5,000 grants to implement community projects following their participation in the Reilly Center for Media & Public Affairs' inaugural capacity building program, The Community Collaborative: By the Community, For the Community.

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LSU Reilly Center's 'Racism: Dismantling the System' Season Opener To Cover Anti-Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Racism

BATON ROUGE--Racism experienced in Asian American and Pacific Islander communities is highlighted in the first episode of the LSU Reilly Center for Media & Public Affairs' "Racism: Dismantling the System" virtual series. Anti-AAPI Racism and Its Effects will contribute to the global discussion on Asian and Pacific Islander racism brought to the forefront during the COVID-19 pandemic. Join the discussion on Tuesday, Sept. 28, at 3:30 p.m. CT by registering on Eventbrite.

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Green Shouldn’t Mean White: Global Non-Profit Partners with LSU Manship to Increase Diversity in Environmental Communications

When the Louisiana chapter of The Nature Conservancy (TNC), a global environmental organization with more than one million members and the largest such non-profit in the U.S., realized they needed more diverse messaging—and messengers—to reach more people in local communities to build broader consensus and support around life- and livelihood-sustaining conservation programs, they turned to the LSU Manship School of Mass Communication.

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What Happens When a Newspaper's Opinion Page Ignores National Politics?

A Google alert prompted LSU Assistant Professor of Political Communication Joshua Darr to drop everything else he was working on. From the alert, he read that Julie Makinen, the executive editor of The Desert Sun newspaper in southern California, had mentioned one of his studies. In this study, he had found political polarization increases when a local newspaper closes. In the absence of local news, Americans rely more heavily on national news sources to make political decisions. And the result is: "People are more likely to vote for one party up and down the ballot," Darr said.

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LSU Professor John Maxwell Hamilton's 'Manipulating the Masses' Nationally Recognized, Wins AJHA Book of the Year

BATON ROUGE--LSU Professor of Journalism John Maxwell Hamilton's book, "Manipulating the Masses: Woodrow Wilson and the Birth of American Propaganda," has been selected as the American Journalism Historians Association's (AJHA) 2021 Book of the Year winner. The award recognizes the best book in journalism history or mass media history published during the previous calendar year.

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