Comparative Literature Courses

Spring 2018


Related Course of interest
 

 

 


 Fall 2017

CPLT 7020/ Tu 3-6 pm History of Literary Theory from the Late Nineteenth Century to the Present - Adelaide Russo (frruss@lsu.edu)  This course addresses the evolution of literary theory and the history of criticism from 1850 to the present. Approaches to literary analysis discussed include: phenomenology, structuralism, post-structuralism, linguistics and pragmatics, anthropology, psychoanalysis, gender and cultural studies. Students will examine a broad spectrum of critical texts, and will be required to confront their theoretical readings with practical analysis of various literary genres. REQUIRED: PHD IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE; RECOMMENDED FOR CPLT MINORS

CPLT 7120/ M 3-5:50 PM Dante and the Arabic Philosophical Tradition - Greg. B. Stone (stone@lsu.edu) Close study of Dante’s Comedy (Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso), with special focus on its relation to the Arabic rationalist philosophical tradition and the question concerning the relation between philosophy and religion. A work of great scope that aims to provide a complete picture of the reality of the cosmos and of human virtues and vices, Dante’s poem is a compendium of the scientific, philosophical, religious, literary, historical, and political issues from the time of Aristotle to the early Renaissance. Readings in English.

CPLT 7130 (Sec 1)/ THTR 7920-01 Tu-Th 10:30-12 Seminar: Drama of the African Diaspora. -Femi Euba (theuba@lsu.edu) A study of the dramatic and theatrical expressions of the black cultures of the New World (North and South America, and the Caribbean), identifying, where possible, comparable connections with African counterparts. Works include those by August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks, Aime Cesaire, Abdias do Nascimento, and Derek Walcott.

CPLT 7130 (sec 2)/ SPANISH 7961 W 4:30- 7:30 pm Gender and Nation in the Fin de Siècle European Literature -Dorota Heneghan (dheneg1@lsu.edu) This course explores the interplay between gender and nation in the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century European literature. We will look how specific ideals of gender enabled Spanish, German, Russian, and Polish writers to share their vision of the modern nation. Authors include: Clarín La Regenta (1885), Galdós Tristana (1892), Baroja The Tree of Knowledge (1911), Thomas Mann Buddenbrooks (1900), Heinrich Mann Professor Unrat (1905), Chekhov The Duel (1891), Orzeszkowa On the Niemen (1888), Prus The Doll (1890) and Zeromski The Faithful River (1912). Theoretical texts on gender and nation include: Gellner, Bhaba, Anderson, Hosbsbawm, Mosse, and Yuval-Davis.

CPLT 7140/ Thu 3-5:50 pm Interdisciplinary Studies Theorizing the Visual, Performing, and Literary Arts of the Caribbean - Solimar Otero and Eric Mayer-García (solimar@lsu.edu) This course explores the intersections between the visual, performing, and literary arts of the Caribbean with an eye towards theorizing cultural admixture. We look at creative expression that crosses boundaries and blends traditions, genres, and perspectives on the region, politics, and populations. Some theoretical models and artistic approaches we explore include: transculturation, surrealism, bricolage, creolization, adaptation, palimpsests, tropicalizations, satire, assemblage theory, and de-familiarization. Artists and authors like Wilfredo Lam, Virgilio Piñera, André Pierre, Edwidge Danticat, Aimé Césaire, Édouard Glissant, Josefina Báez, Reinaldo Arenas, Thomas Glave, Migdalia Cruz, Julia de Burgos, Lorna Goodison, Cecil Cooper and María Irene Fornés will be put into conversation with each other. The course also concentrates on how mixed media work and collaborative approaches to artistic production provide a palette for discussing connections between Francophone, Anglophone, and Hispanic Caribbean experiences.

CPLT 8900 / TBA Teaching World Literature - Adelaide Russo (frruss@lsu.edu) Students will audit the undergraduate section of World Literature and meet to discuss theoretical and practical issues related to Teaching World Literature to Undergraduates. Required for all graduate teaching assistants.

CPLT 2201 /ENGL/ M-W-F 9:30-10:20 Introduction to World Literature

CPLT 2202 / ENGL/ Tu-Th 12:30-1:20 Modern World Literature