Course Offerings Spring 2020

Courses marked with a double asterisk (**) offer General Education Humanities credit.

Course Professor Time/Day

**HIST 1001.1: Western Civilization to 1500

History 1001 covers the history of Western Civilization (basically West European and related Mediterranean cultures) up to the Modern period, roughly 1500 C.E. The main emphasis is on Classical Greece and Rome; Christianity and its roots in Jewish religion/society; the Mediterranean after the Roman Empire; emergence of Western European states in the Middle Ages. Along with lecture presentations there are assigned readings in the textbook and a few ancient documents available on the course website. Grading is based on attendance, two in-class exams and a final, as well as map quizzes, multiple-choice online quizzes and enrichment activities linked to the textbook. Each exam has an essay component and also a multiple-choice section. This is a General Education course.
Prof. Steven Ross 9:00-10:20 T Th

**HIST 1001.2: Western Civilization to 1500

Development of Western Civilization from the Reformation to the present. This is a General Education course.
Prof. Christine Kooi 1:30-2:20 M W F
**HIST 1003.1: Western Civilization since 1500
Development of Western Civilization from the Reformation to the present. This is a General Education course.
Prof. Victor Stater

10:30-11:20

M W F

**HIST 1003.2: Western Civilization since 1500

Development of Western Civilization from the Reformation to the present. This is a General Education course.
Prof. James Hardy 9:00-10:20 T Th

 

**HIST 1003.3: Western Civilization since 1500

Development of Western Civilization from the Reformation to the present. This is a General Education course.

Jason Wolfe 10:30-11:50 T Th

**HIST 1004.1: Western Civilization since 1500, Honors

Development of Western Civilization from the Reformation to the present, with Honors emphasis for qualified students. This is a General Education course. 

Prof. James Hardy

12:00-1:20

T Th

**HIST 1005.1: World History to 1500

Developments and interactions among Asian, African, European, American and Oceanian cultures in the pre-modern age. This is a General Education course.    

Prof. Asiya Alam

9:30-10:20

M W F

**HIST 1007.1: World History since 1500

Interactions among Asian, Middle Eastern, African, European and American cultures in the modern era.  This is a General Education course.    

Prof. Asiya Alam

11:30-12:20

M W F

**HIST 1007.2: World History since 1500 

Interactions among Asian, Middle Eastern, African, European and American cultures in the modern era.  This is a General Education course.      

Prof. Gibril Cole 12:30-1:20 M W F

**HIST 2055.1: US History to 1865 

History of the United States from the Colonial period to the Civil War era. This is a General Education course.

Staff 9:00-10:20 T Th

**HIST 2057.1: US History 1865 to Present

History of the United States from the Civil War era to the present day. This is a General Education course.   

Prof. Catherine Jacquet

10:30-11:20 

M W F

**HIST 2057.2: US History 1865 to Present 

History of the United States from the Civil War era to the present day. This is a General Education course. 

Prof. Gaines Foster

12:30-1:20

M W F

**HIST 2057.4: US History 1865 to Present 

History of the United States from the Civil War era to the present day. This is a General Education course.  

Staff 1:30-2:50  T Th

**HIST 2058.1: US History 1865 to Present, Honors  

History 2058 is taught in conjunction with History 2057, sec. 2.  Students in Hist 2058 attend that class and meet all its requirements.  In addition, students in 2058 meet once a week for a small group discussion, using in part one additional book.  They also write two additional papers. This is a General Education course.

*STUDENTS IN THIS COURSE MUST BE AVAILABLE ON WED 1:30-2:30

Prof. Gaines Foster 12:30-1:20 M W F AND 1:30-2:20  W

**HIST 2061: African-American History  

This course examines the social, political, and economic impact of African American communities in the United States. Beginning with the mass importation of Africans as a labor force in the late fifteenth century, the survey serves as an introduction to the history of achievement and exploitation in one of the most culturally influential populations in world history. The course covers that history into the late twentieth century looking at African American impact on American society and politics into the postmodern era. The class is aimed at familiarizing students with the general problems, needs, and goals of African American populations in hopes of demonstrating the ways in which those material realities and cultural norms are contingent on a dynamic and continuous exchange with the rest of the United States that makes African Americans both consumers and creators of the broader American culture. This is a General Education course.  

Prof. Kodi Roberts

12:00-1:20 

 T Th

 **HIST 2065: U.S. Popular Culture

This course will explore the history of popular entertainment from the late-nineteenth century to the present.  The history of popular theater, music, radio, films, and television will be emphasized as will issues of racial and sexual stereotyping.  The goal of the course is to view modern American history through the lens of popular culture.  Assignments will focus on argumentative papers in which students will analyze popular cultural documents with reference to lectures and assigned readings.  No prerequisites required.  This is a General Education course.  

Prof. Charles Shindo   4:30-5:50  M W    

**HIST 2125:  Premodern Cities

This course explores the social, cultural, religious, and political history of cities before 1500.  It provides a survey of ancient and medieval cities from their origins around the Mediterranean basin to their spread to the far reaches of northern Europe by the beginnings of the early modern world. The focus of the course is on the social, cultural, religious, and political history of the cities through an exploration of their urban fabric and layout.  Each week will focus on a pair of cities as exemplars for the themes and readings for the week.  The readings will include a mixture of primary sources and secondary material. Assignments include discussions, written exams, and a final project on a city of your choice. This is a General Education course.

Prof. Maribel Dietz

10:30-11:50

T Th 

**HIST 2126: Cities of Modern Europe 

This course provides a virtual tour of Europe, beginning with Venice, Rome, and Ghent in the era of the Renaissance, and concluding with Berlin, Warsaw, Sarajevo, and Brussels in the later 20th and early 21st centuries. Each lecture will examine the architectural and cultural splendors, as well as the military and economic disasters, that have given European cities their own identities and unique histories. Students in the course will complete their own individual research projects on a European city; clicker quizzes, two midterms, and a final exam will also be counted into course grading. A survey course in modern European history, such as HIST 1003, is recommended, but not required, for this course. This is a General Education course. 

Prof. Suzanne Marchand

1:30-2:50

T Th 

HIST 2196: Fascist Europe        

What was fascism, how did it operate, and does it belong in the dustbin of history? This course focuses on fascism in interwar Europe, The time and place of its strongest movements. Most of the course is devoted to Mussolini’s Italy and Nazi Germany, with some attention to other, smaller movements. The course is reading and writing intensive. Assignments will include papers and take-home exams.

 Prof. Brendan Karch

10:30-11:50

T Th 

Hist 3071: Louisiana

This is a general survey of Louisiana’s history from the earliest days of colonization to the present. Although the primary focus is on events that took place within the boundaries of the modern state, we also cover material intended to help students understand Louisiana’s history in terms of relevant regional, national, and international events and contexts. There are three exams. Each of them has an essay component.

Prof. Alecia Long

11:30-12:20

M W F 

HIST 3117: Seminar on the History of Globalization

This seminar explores the history of globalization with the goal of understanding what this much-talked-about phenomenon really is and what are some of its benefits and challenges. We will especially focus on global connections (economic, environmental, and cultural), the complex relationships between the global and the local, and the evolution of networks of connectivity between different groups of people in different geographical areas. Communication-intensive course.

Prof. Margherita Zanasi 3:00-5:50 W

HIST 3118: Seminar on Medieval Religious Cultures

This class will examine the religious cultures of the medieval Mediterranean world.  We will investigate the historical development of Judaism, Christianity and Islam in this era.  Themes will include authority structures, law and practice, as well as theological and contemplative writings.  The course will involve discussion of primary sources and the work of modern scholars, along with short papers building toward a longer research project on a topic that students will develop in consultation with the professor. 

Prof. Sherri Johnson 1:30-2:50 M W

HIST 3119.1 Seminar: Debating Democracy

The course is a study in democracy’s ideals when they buck up against political reality, and the language that has animated American political culture across centuries.  The course is divided into two parts: THEN and NOW.  The first half covers the period from 1776 to post-Civil War Reconstruction; the second half probes today’s debates about the future of American democracy.  We encounter a range of literature intended to provoke thought as much as feed hopes; this involves nationalism, identity, partisan psychology, and racial justice.  There are two research papers and a take-home final exam.

Prof. Andrew Burstein

10:30-11:50

T Th 

HIST 3119.2 Seminar: America’s Founding Myths 

American identity has always been defined by a belief in “American Exceptionalism.”  But the process of inventing a nation involves several stages and inevitably unleashes conflicting interests.  The desire to fashion a coherent creation story has served to delete from our collective historical consciousness the contributions of important people and the memory of crucial struggles.  This class will cover several key themes: how Natives Americans were written out of the myth, the fashioning of historical fairytales about the American Revolution, in which prominent leaders are reduced to heroes and villains; and the problem of slavery in tarnishing America’s exceptional identity.  The readings will include:Jill Lepore, The Name of War: King Philip’s War and the Origins of American Identity (1999); Ray Raphael, America’s Founding Myths: Stories that hide Our Patriotic Past (2005); Nancy Isenberg, Fallen Founder: The Life of Aaron Burr (2008); Jan Ellen Lewis and Peter Onuf, eds., Sally Hemings and Thomas Jefferson (1999); Peter Shaw, The Character of John Adams (1977). Students will be expected to watch HBO's John Adams (2008). 

Prof. Nancy Isenberg

12:00-1:20

T Th

HIST 3119.3 Seminar: Civil Rights Revisited

The Civil Rights Movement has been written into the national imagination as a story of progress by peaceful protestors who worked for an end to segregation and the advancement of African Americans "the right way": nonviolent ministers and activists singing songs in front of national monuments that changed the soul of the United States.  We will work to upend this simplistic narrative by calling into question the common tropes about the Civil Rights Movement, from when the movement began, to the rejection of violence, to the gender of the most important players using the biographies of little known figures of the period to complicate the way students understand the struggle for African American equality!

Prof. Kodi Roberts

3:00-4:20

T Th 

HIST 4007: Early Middle Ages     

This course seeks to introduce the student to the history of the Early Middle Ages, 300-1000 AD, Through a focus on primary source readings. The student will learn how to analyze these and other sources, and how to use them in the study of history.  The geographic focus of the course is the Mediterranean basin and beyond, comprising the early European, Byzantine and Islamic societies.  Readings include selections from Augustine of Hippo, Gregory of Tours, The Táin, Beowulf, Life of Antony, Passion of Perpetua, the Qur’an, Einhard, and the Benedictine Rule.

Prof. Maribel Dietz

1:30-2:50

T Th

HIST 4011: Age of Reformation    

European history from 1400-1700 with special emphasis on religious upheaval and its social, cultural and political effects. Cross-listed with Religious Studies 4011. 

Prof. Christine Kooi

10:30-11:20

M W F 

HIST 4016: Europe in the 19th Century  

This course examines the political, social, and cultural ebbs and flows of the long 19th century.  It will start with a brief review of the French Revolution and end with the outbreak of the First World War.  Some themes that will be highlighted are modernity, liberalism, radicalism, nationalism, imperialism, Romanticism, and Realism. There will be a recommended textbook on reserve at Middleton as well as at least two historical monographs and one work of fiction. *Honors Option offered.*

Jason Wolfe

9:00-10:20

T Th

HIST 4044: Stuart England

This course covers Britain’s ‘Century of Revolution’ from 1603 to 1714, a period which saw civil war, the trial and execution of a king, and the overthrow of a dynasty. Course requirements include a midterm, final, and research paper.

Prof. Victor Stater

12:30-1:20

M W F 

HIST 4047: 20th Century Britain

A survey of British history from 1900 to the present, with special attention paid to the impact of total war on social structure, political life, and cultural values; the experience of imperialism and the loss of empire; the shift to a “post-Christian” culture; the emergence of a multi-racial society; and the making of Brexit. This course relies heavily on class discussion; attendance is required. Assignments include a number of films and oral histories, a novel (Alan Sillitoe’s Saturday Night and Sunday Morning), a journalist’s exposé (Bill Buford’s Among the Thugs), and an album (the Beatles, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band). Course grade is based on class participation, reading and viewing quizzes, class forum contributions, a longer paper, and a final exam. 

Prof. Meredith Veldman

11:30-12:20

M W F 

HIST 4053: Jefferson & Hamilton  

This course focuses on the life and legacy of Thomas Jefferson; the apparent contradiction of his eloquent defense of liberty and his ownership of slaves; and his political rivalry with Alexander Hamilton.  It also concerns issues of national self-definition in the period 1776-1809.  The final grade is calculated on the basis of two exams (with a paper option) plus class performance.

Prof. Andrew Burstein

1:30-2:50

T Th

HIST 4092: China Since 1600      

This course is a survey of Chinese history from the ascent to power of the last Chinese Dynasty, the Qing (1644-1911) to the establishment of the People's Republic of China (1949) under the leadership of Mao Zedong. We will start with an examination of Chinese society and civilization in the late imperial period. We will then examine China's attempt to transform itself into a republic in 1911, spurred by deep internal social and cultural changes and by pressure from Western imperialism. The 1911 Republican revolution, however, did not end China's search for a new political and cultural identity. China, in fact, emerged from a bloody war with Japan (1937-1945) to face a devastating civil war (1945-1949) that pitched one against each other two political parties, the Nationalist and the Communist, with very different visions of modern China.

Prof. Margherita Zanasi

1:30-2:50

T Th 

HIST 4094: Modern Japan

From 1600 to the present. Emphasis on the historical and cultural roots of Japan’s modernization in the late 19th century and the quest for empire in the 20th century; cultural and intellectual developments in modern Japan.

Kathryn Barton

3:00-4:20

T Th 

HIST 4140: Vietnam War 

French colonial rule and Vietnamese nationalism; Ho Chi Minh and the war against the French (1946-1954); the National Liberation Front (Vietcong); process of American involvement and disengagement; counter-insurgency and the air war; anti-war movement in the United States; reasons for failure of American policy; Vietnam since 1975; lessons and legacies for the U.S. 

Mark Carson

12:00-1:20

T Th 

HIST 4161: History of Religion in the US

A chronological and thematic survey of American religious history, with special consideration given to the diversity of religion in the United States. The course begins with the European colonization of the Americas and moves through topics such as the Great Awakenings, slave religions, Mormonism, Native American religions, fundamentalism, Roman Catholicism, and Judaism, as well as new immigrant religions like Buddhism, Hinduism, and Islam. Students will learn how religious groups influenced and were influenced by American culture. An assortment of reading materials, writing assignments, and creative projects will allow students to engage a variety of religious issues and understand the significance and relevance of religion in the history of the United States. Cross-listed with Religious Studies 4161.

Prof. Michael Pasquier

10:30-11:50

T Th 

HIST 4195.2: History of the Drug Trade

This course is designed to be a historical and contemporary reading of the rise of the Latin American drug trade. We will begin our study with an overview of the Mexican drug trade, but then quickly provide a larger historical context starting in early modern Europe, moving through the nineteenth century, then on to the twentieth and the increase in prohibitions of psychoactive agents by nation states.  We will show how drugs are basically commodities, bought and sold for economic purposes. Through historical writing, ethnographies, legal regimes, popular music, and film this course examines the intersections between globalization and the drug trade, focused especially on the Americas. The course will spend quite a bit of time looking at Mexico’s current drug culture and its political, cultural, and social ramifications for North, Central, and South America. Moreover, drugs are a social and cultural product, meaning that they are constructed as “bad” or “good” based on legal, social and cultural perspectives, and not merely or exclusively on inherent characteristics.  We will analyze the contested and constructed meanings of drugs within a transnational context. Drugs, therefore, become a way to investigate world history as the meaning and importance of certain substances change over time.

Prof. Stephen Andes

9:30-10:20

M W F 

HIST 4196: World of Alexander the Great

An introduction to the very eventful period of Ancient Mediterranean history between the heyday of Classical Greece and the rise of Rome to Mediterranean-wide power.  Students will follow the amazing life and career of Alexander III of Macedon (Alexander “the Great”), and witness the transformation of the Greek world and of the Persian Empire that previously dominated the region.  In the second half of the course we will examine the emergence of the Hellenistic Kingdoms, which both laid the groundwork for the Roman Empire in this area and formed the cultural background for later important events (including the rise of Christianity).  Moderate reading load; two midterm exams, two papers, final exam.

Prof. Steven Ross

12:00-1:20

T Th 

HIST 4197.1: Scandals in American History

This class explores the historical meaning of political scandal in the United States. We will begin with Benedict Arnold (the first “American” traitor) and end with the Abu Ghraib scandal. Scandals contribute to the ongoing debate over what is dangerous to American democracy, invoking (at times, exaggerating, even distorting) palpable fears of deceit and secrecy, sexual disorder, racial impurity, social violence, tyranny and anarchy. Political scandals are more than an entertaining sideshow to the normal activities of democratic governance. By creating a public and national forum, they shape the shifting norms of state power and constitutional authority, moral expectations of presidential leadership, and the language of nationhood. Required Reading: Books (and some additional articles from JSTOR): John Marszalek, The Petticoat Affair (2000); Michael Les Benedict, The Impeachment and Trial of Andrew Johnson (1973); Eric Rauchway, Murdering McKinley (2003); James Madison, A Lynching in the Heartland (2001); Keith W. Olsen, Watergate: The Presidential Scandal that Shook America (2003). 

Prof. Nancy Isenberg

3:00-4:20

T Th

 HIST 4197.2: Louisiana and the Kennedy Assassination

In 1966 Orleans Parish D.A. Jim Garrison began an investigation into the possibility of Louisiana-based conspiracy in the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

 We will spend the first part of the course reading reliable secondary works that examine the Kennedy assassination and its aftermath--especially the rise of conspiracy theorizing. Students will submit assignments designed to encourage completion of readings and active participation in class discussion. In the second part of the course we will begin exploring relevant primary source evidence with the goal of learning how historians assess the reliability and relative usefulness of historical evidence. In the final part of the course, students will  write a research paper or complete an alternate project.

Only students willing to complete assigned course readings, participate actively in class discussions, challenge themselves to think critically about contested historical interpretations, and work diligently to produce a strong final paper or project should enroll.

Prof. Alecia Long  

9:00-10:20

T Th  

Hist 4901.1: Internships

Students can intern at a nearby historical site and earn three hours of credit. Course involves 90 work hours during the semester, confirmed by a mentor/supervisor, a few meetings with the course instructor and a 10-15 page paper at the end evaluating the experience and what was learned.

BEFORE ENROLLING STUDENTS MUST CONTACT DR. STATER, stater@lsu.edu OR THE DEPARTMENT: dalbri1@lsu.edu 

 

Prof. Victor Stater  

  

Graduate Courses

HIST 7909: Research Seminar in European History  3:00-5:50 M  Prof. Meredith Veldman

HIST 7923: Seminar in European History from 1500  3:00-5:50 T  Prof. Brendan Karch

HIST 7930: Reading Seminar in British History  (time TBA)  Prof. Victor Stater

HIST 7952: Reading Seminar in American History 1815-          3:00-5:50 W  Prof. Aaron Sheehan-Dean

HIST 7957.1: Research Seminar in American History   3:00-5:50 M Prof. Meredith Veldman

HIST 7957.2: Research Seminar in American History   (time TBA)  Staff

HIST 7959: Cultural History   3:00-5:50 T Prof. Charles Shindo