PhD Candidates on the Job Market

Below are some of our PhD candidates who are currently on the job market.

Elizabeth E. Brault

Elizabeth BraultResearch Interests: Reentry, community organization, social support, crime & delinquency
Email: emarks7@lsu.edu
Website
CV

I am broadly interested in the importance of neighborhoods and communities for crime, with my dissertation research focusing on how social capital is linked to recidivism at multiple levels of analysis. I have published manuscripts in Deviant Behavior, PLOS ONE, and Perspectives on Global Development and Technology. I served as a Research Assistant on a Justice Reinvestment Initiative grant for the Louisiana Department of Corrections from 2015 to 2018. In this capacity, I spearheaded the creation of a needs assessment tool to help individuals successfully reenter and reintegrate into their communities. This research has also sparked a strong interest in reentry for special groups within the justice system including mature long-term offenders (Miller, Montgomery), juvenile offenders, domestic violence offenders and survivors, and people of color.

 

Brad Ictech

Brad IctechResearch Interests: Social psychology, online games, social media, smartphones, virtual reality
Email: bradictech@gmail.com
Website
CV

Brad Ictech is a social psychologist interested in how technology affects society and the self. His current research interests include relationship formation and maintenance through computer mediated communication channels (e.g., smartphone apps, social media, VoIP programs, and virtual reality) and artificial intelligence and the self. He received a MA in Sociology from the University of New Orleans and is currently a PhD candidate at Louisiana State University.

 


Muhammed Yildiz

Muhammed YildizResearch Interests: Deviance, mental health, military
Email: myildi1@lsu.edu
Website
CV

Muhammed Yildiz (M.A.) is a Ph.D. candidate in Sociology at Louisiana State University (LSU). His areas of interest are sociology of mental health, deviance, and the interplay between the two. Most of his research is quantitative, focusing on individual and contextual risk factors of adolescent mental and behavioral health outcomes (depression, substance use, suicidal behaviors etc.). His research has appeared in several academic journals, including Youth & Society and Death Studies. He also thought undergraduate courses such as Statistics in Social Research and Introduction to Sociology. He was recently awarded Dissertation Year Fellowship by LSU Graduate School. Currently, he is working on his dissertation, which applies the stress process theory within mental health literature to suicidal behaviors of U.S. adolescents.