International Advisory Board

   

Peter Goodwin

Professor and President, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
 
He is an internationally recognized expert in ecosystem restoration, ecohydraulics, and enhancement of river, wetland and estuarine systems, and he has spent 30 years in higher education. Goodwin is the founding director of the Center for Ecohydraulics Research at the University of Idaho, an interdisciplinary group working on the simulation of ecological response to management actions or changes in physical processes of rivers, lakes, estuaries, and wetlands. He currently serves as president of the International Association for Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research

Peter Goodwin

Rick Luettich

Director, Institute of Marine Sciences; DHS Coastal Resilience COE at the University of North Carolina

Rick Luettich has an undergraduate and master’s degree in civil engineering from Georgia Tech and a doctor of science in civil engineering from MIT.  He serves as the Director of UNC’s Institute of Marine ScienceHe also serves as the Director of the UNC Center for Natural Hazards Resilience and is the lead-PI on the Department of Homeland Security Coastal Resilience Center of Excellence and on the US IOOS Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed. He is one of the principal developers of the ADCIRC coastal circulation and storm surge modeland has overseen applications ranging from interdisciplinary studies of physically mediated migration, larval dispersal and water quality, to coastal hazard delineation to hindcasts and forecasts of tides and storm surge/inundation along the US coast.

Rick Luettich

Robert Nicholls

Professor of Coastal Engineering, University of Southampton

 Robert leads research and education in coastal engineering. His research is focused on long-term coastal engineering and management, especially the issues of coastal impacts and adaptation to climate change, with an emphasis on sea-level rise. This work occurs at all scales from local research in the Solent, up to global assessments. A major recent theme of research is the future of deltaic areas which are the most threatened coastal setting in the coming century. He has also been involved in a number of international assessments, and in particular the International Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), who were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007. He was awarded the Roger Revelle Medal by the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission in 2008. This recognizes 'outstanding contributions to the ocean sciences by inspired researchers who communicate their knowledge and global vision of the challenges facing our Planet in order to shape a better future for humankind'.  Currently, he is co-lead of the World Climate Research Programme Grand Challenge on 'Regional sea-level change and coastal impacts' which will organize 'Sea Level 2017' at Columbia University in July 2017. Robert is a member of the Editorial Board of the new journal “Anthropocene Coasts”

 

Robert Nicholls

Larry Weber

Executive Associate Dean, College of Engineering, University of Iowa; Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering; and Edwin B. Green Chair in Hydraulics

Larry Weber is an Iowa native hailing from Dyersville, Iowa. He currently serves as executive associate dean of the UI College of Engineering. He is also professor of civil and environmental engineering and holds the Edwin B. Green Chair in Hydraulics at the University of Iowa College of Engineering. From 2004–17, Weber served as the director of IIHR—Hydroscience & Engineering at the University of Iowa, a world-renowned research institute focusing on education, research, and public service in hydraulic engineering and fluid mechanics. In 2009, he became one of the co-founders of the Iowa Flood Center. 

Weber’s research interests are broadly focused on fish passage facilities, physical modeling, river hydraulics, hydropower, computational hydraulics, and ice mechanics. Specifically, he focuses on the design of fish passage facilities by combining hydrodynamic data and biological data on fish response. Weber and his team apply computational fluids dynamics codes to natural river reaches and hydraulic structures to develop detailed fish passage facilities design. Weber serves the state of Iowa as a member of the Water Resources Coordinating Council; he also serves on numerous state and federal agency committees related to water resources planning. Weber frequently presents to community groups on water resources–related topics. Weber holds BS, MS, and PhD degrees in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Iowa.

 

 

Larry Weber