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Arts & Humanities

National Endowment for the Humanities - 20190515-CHA

The mission of this Challenge Grants program is to strengthen the institutional base of the humanities by enabling infrastructure development and capacity building. Awards aim to help institutions secure long-term support for their core activities and expand efforts to preserve and create access to outstanding humanities materials. Applications are welcome from colleges and universities, museums, public libraries, research institutions, historical societies and historic sites, scholarly associations, state humanities councils, and other public and nonprofit humanities entities. Programs that involve collaboration among multiple institutions are eligible as well, but one institution must serve as the lead applicant of record that will be legally, programmatically, and fiscally responsible for the award. Through these awards organizations can increase their humanities capacity through capital expenditures to support the design, purchase, construction, restoration, or renovation of facilities for humanities activities and the purchase of equipment and software. Such expenditures bring long-term benefits to the institution and to the humanities more broadly. Challenge grants may also support long-term humanities projects with funds invested in a restricted, short-term endowment or other investment fund (or spend-down fund) that generate expendable earnings to support and enhance ongoing humanities activities. Eligible activities include the preservation and conservation of humanities materials, and the sustaining of digital infrastructure for the humanities. Fundraising is a critical part of NEH Challenge grant awards: up to 10 percent of total funds (federal matching funds plus certified gifts) may be used for fundraising costs during the period of performance. Challenge funds (both federal matching funds and required nonfederal gifts) must enhance the humanities in the long term. Challenge grants should not merely replace funds already being expended, but instead should reflect careful strategic planning to strengthen and enrich an institution’s humanities activities. Institutions may use challenge funds to meet both ongoing and one-time humanities-related costs, provided that the long-term benefit of the expenditure can be demonstrated.

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National Endowment for the Humanities - 20190410-FEL

NEH Fellowships are competitive awards granted to individual scholars pursuing projects that embody exceptional research, rigorous analysis, and clear writing. Applications must clearly articulate a project’s value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Fellowships provide recipients time to conduct research or to produce books, monographs, peer-reviewed articles, e-books, digital materials, translations with annotations or a critical apparatus, or critical editions resulting from previous research. Projects may be at any stage of development. NEH invites research applications from scholars in all disciplines of the humanities, and it encourages submissions from independent scholars and junior scholars. Applicants interested in research projects that are either born digital or require mainly digital expression and digital publication are encouraged to apply instead for NEH-Mellon Fellowships for Digital Publication.

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The Teagle Foundation

Education for American Civic Life

The charge of the Teagle Foundation is “to support and strengthen liberal arts education, which we see as fundamental to meaningful work, effective citizenship, and a fulfilling life.” Among the strengths of liberal arts education is the marriage of content and context to cultivate in students the knowledge and skills they need to achieve this vision. In consideration of “effective citizenship,” the Foundation is especially concerned with undergraduates’ knowledge about American democratic institutions and the general decline in civility in discourse within and beyond our campus communities.

Pathways to the Liberal Arts

Students and their families face myriad pressures as they navigate the process of enrolling in college. One of the most important decisions they can make in the college choice process is what to study. How can high school students get a deeper sense of what a rigorous liberal arts education offers so they can make educated choices about what to study as undergraduates? How can students who start their college careers at more affordable two-year institutions – and often express an interest in pursuing the liberal arts – be set on a well-marked pathway to complete the baccalaureate in the liberal arts? And how can students, regardless of where they are enrolled, have an enriching and enlarging liberal arts education that prepares them for lives of effective citizenship and satisfying work?

Liberal Arts and the Professions

A liberal arts education provides the intellectual scaffolding for students to learn “how to learn” in order to be successful in a variety of capacities. However, exposure to the liberal arts in professional programs typically occurs in the form of general education distribution requirements that are not fully integrated into students’ undergraduate experience. This initiative challenges the prevailing mode of professional preparation by asking: How can institutions fully integrate and embed the liberal arts into undergraduate preparation for the professions?

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National Endowment for the Humanities - 20190326-HT

The Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities (IATDH) program supports national or regional (multistate) training programs for scholars, humanities professionals, and advanced graduate students to broaden and extend their knowledge of digital humanities. Through this program NEH seeks to increase the number of humanities scholars and practitioners using digital technology in their research and to broadly disseminate knowledge about advanced technology tools and methodologies relevant to the humanities. Applicants may apply to create institutes that are a single opportunity or are offered multiple times to different audiences. Institutes may be as short as a few days and held at multiple locations or as long as six weeks at a single site; virtual institutes are also permissible. Training opportunities could be offered before or after regularly occurring scholarly meetings, during the summer months, or during appropriate times of the academic year. The duration of a program should allow for full and thorough treatment of the topic; it should also be appropriate for the intended audience. These professional development programs may focus on a particular computational method, such as network or spatial analysis. They may also target the needs of a particular humanities discipline or audience.

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Bureau Of Educational and Cultural Affairs - SFOP0005561

Cultural diplomacy enhances cross-cultural understanding and opens new avenues of dialogue and collaboration between individuals and nations. In support of U.S. Department of State foreign policy objectives, Creative Arts Exchange initiatives are arts-based, international people-to-people exchange programs. They create partnerships through artistic collaboration and professional development that enrich both the international participants and the Americans with whom they meet. Programs are implemented in close coordination with U.S. embassies and consulates abroad. Eligible themes and/or artistic genres for CAE initiatives vary and are determined based on Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) strategic priorities. The goals of the CAE are to: Foster mutual understanding and deepen trust between the people of the United States and abroad to counter negative stereotypes and advance safety and security; Advance and complement U.S. foreign policy objectives; Provide unique opportunities for artistic collaboration and engagement between U.S. and foreign artists and audiences; Convey the diversity and high artistic merit of the arts in the United States and increase awareness and understanding of U.S. art, culture, values, and society among international participants and audiences; Foster opportunities for educational outreach and community engagement with diverse and under-served communities, especially youth (ages 12-25), women, and persons with disabilities; Engage participants in instructive and informative experiences in a particular art form to promote creative industries and entrepreneurship; and Create opportunities for sustaining relationships and collaborations between U.S. and international artists and institutions that endure beyond the program duration.

Agency Documentation

National Endowment for the Arts - 2019NEA01CA

- An organization that applies to the Challenge America category, may not submit another application to the Art Works category. – You may apply to other National Endowment for the Arts funding opportunities, including Our Town, in addition to Challenge America. In each case, the request must be for a distinctly different project or a distinctly different phase of the same project, with a different period of performance and costs. - The Arts Endowment's support of a project may start on or after January 1, 2020. Grants awarded under these guidelines generally may cover a period of performance of up to two years. An organization that has received Challenge America grants in FY 2017, 2018, and 2019 may not apply for a Challenge America grant under these FY 2020 guidelines. That organization may apply for FY 2020 support under other National Endowment for the Arts funding opportunities including Art Works. Program Description The Challenge America category offers support primarily to small and mid-sized organizations for projects that extend the reach of the arts to underserved populations -- those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability. Age alone (e.g., youth, seniors) does not qualify a group as underserved; at least one of the underserved characteristics noted above also must be present. Please provide details about the underserved audience you select in your application using relevant statistics and anecdotal information. Proposals should detail the efforts made to reach the identified underserved population. Grants are available for professional arts programming and for projects that emphasize the potential of the arts in community development.

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Biological & Health Sciences

American Diabetes Association

Pathway to Stop Diabetes is a bold, innovative initiative designed to radically transform diabetes research. Our Vision is simple yet revolutionary: find a new generation of brilliant scientists at the peak of their creativity, and provide them with freedom, autonomy, and the financial and professional resources to set them on the road to breakthrough discoveries.

This initiative enables scientists to advance not only their research, but also their careers. Pathway scientists have access to the Mentor Advisory Group, an annual Pathway symposia, select speaking opportunities, and innovative technologies, all designed to foster interactions and collaboration that will enable them to accelerate their research progress.

Pathway seeks to bring new investigators and new perspectives to diabetes research. Supporting scientists with different backgrounds and experience is critical to achieving that objective. Pathway accepts nominations for exceptional investigators with medical and scientific backgrounds who propose innovative basic, clinical, translational, behavioral, epidemiological and health services research relevant to any type of diabetes, diabetes-related disease state or complication. Pathway solicits nominations for candidates in all disciplines as applied to diabetes including medicine, biology, chemistry, computing, physics, mathematics and engineering. In addition, nomination of scientists from diverse backgrounds, including minority groups that are underrepresented in biomedical research, is strongly encouraged.

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Edward Mallinckrodt, Jr. Foundation

Edward Mallinckrodt, Jr. Foundation is a private foundation that funds basic biomedical research in St Louis and throughout the United States.
The mission of the Foundation is to support early stage investigators engaged in biomedical research that has the potential to significantly advance the understanding, diagnosis, or treatment of disease.

Mallinckrodt Grants are competitively provided to investigators based on their proposals, selected from applicants on an annual basis. These awards are usually $60,000 per year for three years, provided an annual progress report is submitted and approved. Only one candidates from any institution will be considered per cycle. The proposal deadline is August 1.

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The Pew Charitable Trusts

The Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences provides funding to young investigators of outstanding promise in science relevant to the advancement of human health. The program makes grants to selected academic institutions to support the independent research of outstanding individuals who are in their first few years of their appointment at the assistant professor level.

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National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-179

The Shared Instrument Grant (SIG) Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems. The minimum award is $50,000. There is no maximum price requirement; however, the maximum award is $600,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffractometers, mass and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and light microscopes, cell sorters, and biomedical imagers.

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National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-178

The Shared Instrumentation for Animal Research (SIFAR) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-funded investigators to purchase or upgrade scientific instruments necessary to carry out animal experiments in all areas of biomedical research supported by the NIH. Applicants may request clusters of commercially available instruments configured as specialized integrated systems or as series of instruments to support a thematic well-defined area of research using animals or related materials. Priority will be given to uniquely configured systems to support innovative and potentially transformative investigations. This FOA supports requests for state-of-the art commercially available technologies needed for NIH-funded research using any vertebrate and invertebrate animal species. This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) does not support requests for single instruments. At least one item of the requested instrumentation must cost at least $50,000, after all applicable discounts. No instrument in a cluster can cost less than $20,000, after all applicable discounts. There is no maximum price requirement; however, the maximum award is $750,000.

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National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-177

The High-End Instrumentation (HEI) Grant Program encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems. The minimum award is $600,001. The maximum award is $2,000,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffraction systems, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and confocal microscopes, cell-sorters, and biomedical imagers.

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National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-170

This purpose of this FOA is to identify risk factors for dementia progression in PDD. Applicants must have access to well-characterized populations of PDD patients that have been followed longitudinally that they can continue to follow with clinical assessments and biospecimen collection until autopsy. Research should propose to identify clinical, pathological and/or biospecimen factors that predict which patients will develop cognitive impairment and/or dementia.

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National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-093

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) seeks to support research that examines how health information technology adoption impacts minority health and health disparity populations in access to care, quality of care, patient engagement, and health outcomes.

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National Science Foundation - NSF 18-599

In 2016, the National Science Foundation (NSF) unveiled a set of “Big Ideas,” 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering (see https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/big_ideas/index.jsp). The Big Ideas represent unique opportunities to position our Nation at the cutting edge of global science and engineering leadership by bringing together diverse disciplinary perspectives to support convergence research. As such, when responding to this solicitation, even though proposals must be submitted to the Division of Emerging Frontiers in the Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO/EF) , once received, the proposals will be managed by a cross-disciplinary team of NSF Program Directors.

This solicitation describes an Ideas Lab on “Building a Synthetic Cell.” Ideas Labs are intensive workshops focused on finding innovative solutions to grand challenge problems. The ultimate aim of this Ideas Lab organized by the National Science Foundation is to facilitate the generation and execution of innovative research projects aimed at designing, fabricating, and validating synthetic cells that express specified phenotypes. The aspiration is that mixing researchers who have diverse scientific backgrounds will engender original thinking and innovative approaches that will transform our understanding of cellular processes, the molecular mechanisms that underscore the building and function of systems that reproduce life traits, the self-assembly of life-like systems, soft condensed matter, and the physics and chemistry of life that are needed to design and build cellular components, cells and multicell systems.

The ability to design and manufacture synthetic cells has significant implications for the scientific and economic enterprise of the United States. The synthesis of viable cells from non-living molecules and materials can open the door to the production of functional biomaterials and improved biofuels, large scale chemical synthesis, non-silicon-based computing, novel soil engineering, and medical and pharmaceutical advances, to name just a few possibilities. The study of synthetic cells, and of the processes used in their creation, can also provide a window on the origin and evolution of life on Earth and, potentially, provide insight into extraterrestrial life.

Synthetic cells have a number of shared characteristics. They may possess many of the structures of biological cells and reproduce capabilities such as self-replication, metabolism and response to environmental cues. However, they may be engineered using novel molecules and materials and structures to mimic single or complex biological functions. There are many reasons to engage in synthetic cell research; for example, to better understand what constitutes a living system, to identify the truly essential functions of cells, and building in itself can be a way to demonstrate understanding. Synthetic cell research employs a wide range of approaches including ‘top down’ methodologies exemplified by efforts to construct a ‘minimal cell’ by gradually deleting genes and components until a system with the fewest components that still exhibits the hallmarks of life is obtained. The alternative ‘bottom up’ approaches involve assembling molecular building blocks until cellular functions are obtained. These approaches might meet in the middle, and may inform each other.

The design and production of synthetic cells requires the development of innovative and integrative experimental approaches in combination with novel theoretical frameworks, improved mathematical models, new artificial biomaterials, predictive understanding of biological function, and the identification of causal relationships in biological systems (e.g. genotype/phenotype, structure/function), all within an ethical framework that is sensitive to the profound implications of the research being conducted. Building a synthetic cell is a grand challenge at the interface between biological, mathematical, computer and physical sciences and engineering that has the potential to advance not only applications, but also our fundamental understanding of how cells self-assemble and function and of emergent order in non-equilibrium systems. Meeting this challenge requires simultaneous careful exploration of the social and ethical dimensions of such research as well as educating today's students to engage in the activities and technologies required both for developing synthetic cells and for their use in biology, engineering, chemistry, pharmaceutical development, and other activities. Only by doing so will we be able to fully understand both the societal benefits and risks as well as their potential for willful misuse or unintended damage to natural biological systems. In concert with technology development, educating students and the lay public will also be important to ensure an accurate understanding of the scientific advances resulting from the development and use of synthetic cells.

This Ideas Lab advances the objectives of one of 10 Big Ideas for Future NSF Investments: ‘Understanding the Rules of Life: Predicting Phenotype’. The 10 Big Ideas will push forward the frontiers of U.S. research and provide innovative approaches to solve some of the most pressing problems the world faces, as well as lead to discoveries not yet known.

This multi-directorate program is one element of NSF's multi-year effort towards the goals of the Understanding the Rules of Life Big Idea (https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/big_ideas/life.jsp). US researchers may submit preliminary proposals only via FastLane for participation in the Ideas Lab in which a set of multidisciplinary ideas will be developed. These multidisciplinary ideas will form the basis of the full proposals to be written based on the discussion within the Ideas Lab.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - RFA-MH-19-400

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA), in support of the NIH Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative, is one of several FOAs aimed at supporting transformative discoveries that will lead to breakthroughs in understanding human brain function. Guided by the long-term scientific plan, BRAIN 2025: A Scientific Vision, this FOA specifically seeks to support efforts addressing core ethical issues associated with research focused on the human brain and resulting from emerging technologies and advancements supported by the BRAIN Initiative. The hope is that efforts supported under this FOA might be both complementary and integrative with the transformative, breakthrough neuroscience discoveries supported through the BRAIN Initiative.

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National Science Foundation - PD-18-1165

Biological processes at all scales from molecules to ecosystems are determined through the encoding, exchange, and interpretation of information. Advances in the biological sciences are enabled by our capacity to acquire, manage, represent, and analyze biological information through the use of modern instrumentation and computational tools. Developing an integrated understanding of cell function, regulatory systems, or ecological responses to environmental change are just a few examples of biological research areas that involve the acquisition, observation, experiment, and modeling of large amounts of data. Proposals are invited that offer potentially transformative outcomes through the development of informatics tools and resources that (1) offer novel and significant advances in the use of biological data and/or (2) will enable and stimulate advances through their impact on a significant segment of the biological research community supported by the NSF BIO Directorate. Awards in CIBR should produce, or substantially expand a finished product that will have demonstrable impact in advancing biological research. Proposals should convey their likelihood of success through greaterattention touser engagement, design quality, engineering practices, management plan,and dissemination.Budgets and award durationsshould accommodate the iterative process of bringing a proof of concept into a robust, broadly-adopted cyberinfrastructure. Development proposals are more outcome-driven than Innovation awards and are typically assessed on their perceived contribution to a broad portfolio of cyberinfrastructure resources. Synergies with, and leveraging of, other existing and ongoing resources are taken into consideration. CIBR supports development in areas that may include (but are not limited to): Databases consisting of primary data obtained through observation, experimentation, modelling, or synthesis of existing data into new derivative products. New tools for the construction, operation, and utilization of biological databases, including database architectures and infrastructures, data standards designed to be extendable to different biological domains, and data structures for new types of biological information Software or ontologies related to the retrieval, integration, and use of heterogeneous biological information, for example, data discovery, data-mining, data integration or visualization Tools that facilitate biological research workflows, analytic pathways, or integration between the field and the laboratory, or between observation, experiments and models Software and methods for making use of new technologies for the acquisition, communication or visualization of biological data Infrastructure that provides broad community access to shared computational and data resources, commonly referred to as scientific gateways. Higher priority will be placed on proposals to create computational tools and data resources that are applicable to a broad range of biological research questions and shared by a broad user community. Proposals to develop tools ordatabases that are limited to a specific research project, laboratory, or institution should be submitted to the relevant BIO programs that would normally support that research.

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National Science Foundation - 18-594

The Infrastructure Capacity for Biology (ICB) supports the development, expansion, or improvement of infrastructure that will enable fundamental research within the biological sciences. Infrastructure supported under thissolicitation may include cyberinfrastructure, instrumentation, biological collections, living stocks, field stations, marine labs, or other resources that are shared and openly accessible. Proposals submitted to the ICB solicitation must make a compelling case that the proposed infrastructure will advance or transform research in areas of science that are supported by the Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO) at the National Science Foundation. While other programs in the Division of Biological Infrastructure (DBI) focus on innovative research leading to new infrastructure or sustained operation of mature infrastructure, thissolicitation focuses on supporting projects that seek to deliver, enable access to, or substantially improve infrastructure that will advance the capacity oftoday’s scientific community to conduct leading edge research. The impacts of the activities funded by awards made through this solicitation will be reflected not just in the quality of their products, but by the novel and transformative science outcomes that will be achieved by the users of these resources. Infrastructure projects that will advance any field of research supported by the Directorate for Biological Sciences are eligible for support under this program. Please refer to the individual program descriptions for detailed guidance on what is supported through this solicitation: Cyberinfrastructure for Biological Research (CIBR); Collections in Support of Biological Research(CSBR); Improvements in Facilities, Communications, and Equipment at Biological Field Stations and Marine Laboratories(FSML); and Instrumentation Capacity for Biological Research (ICBR).

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 18-590

The Plant Biotic Interactions (PBI) program supports research on the processes that mediate beneficial and antagonistic interactions between plants and their viral, bacterial, oomycete, fungal, plant, and invertebrate symbionts, pathogens and pests. This joint NSF/NIFA program supports projects focused on current and emerging model and non-model systems, and agriculturally relevant plants. The program’s scope extends from fundamental mechanisms to translational efforts, with the latter seeking to put into agricultural practice insights gained from basic research on the mechanisms that govern plant biotic interactions. Projects must be strongly justified in terms of fundamental biological processes and/or relevance to agriculture and may be purely fundamental or applied or include aspects of both perspectives. All types of symbiosis are appropriate, including commensalism, mutualism, parasitism, and host-pathogen interactions. Research may focus on the biology of the plant host, its pathogens, pests or symbionts, interactions among these, or on the function of plant-associated microbiomes. The program welcomes proposals on the dynamics of initiation, transmission, maintenance and outcome of these complex associations, includingstudies of metabolic interactions, immune recognition and signaling, host-symbiont regulation, reciprocal responses among interacting species and mechanisms associated with self/non-self recognition such as those in pollen-pistil interactions. Explanatory frameworks shouldinclude molecular, genomic, metabolic, cellular, network and organismal processes, with projects guided by hypothesis and/or discovery driven experimental approaches. Strictly ecological projects that do not address underlying mechanisms are not appropriate for this program. Quantitative modeling in concert with experimental work is encouraged. Overall, the program seeks to support research that will deepen our understanding of the fundamental processes that mediate interactions between plants and the organisms with which they intimately associate and advance the application of that knowledge to benefit agriculture.

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National Institutes of Health - PAR-18-896

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) supports innovative research and development in biomedical informatics and data science. The scope of NLM's interest in these research domains is broad, with emphasis on new methods and approaches to foster data driven discovery in the biomedical and clinical health sciences as well as domain-independent, reusable approaches to discovery, curation, analysis, organization and management of health-related digital objects. Biomedical informatics and data science draw upon many fields, including mathematics, statistics, information science, computer science and engineering, and social/behavioral sciences. Application domains include health care delivery, basic biomedical research, clinical and translational research, precision medicine, public health, biosurveillance, health information management in disasters, and similar areas. NLM defines biomedical informatics as the science of optimal representation, organization, management, integration and presentation of information relevant to human health and biology. NIH defines data science as the interdisciplinary field of inquiry in which quantitative and analytical approaches, processes, and systems are developed and used to extract knowledge and insights from increasingly large and/or complex sets of data.

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National Institutes of Health - PAR-17-340

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is designed to support highly integrated research teams of three to six PD/PIs to address ambitious and challenging research questions that are important for the mission of NIGMS and are beyond the scope of an individual or a few investigators. Collaborative program teams are expected to accomplish goals that require considerable synergy and managed team interactions. Project goals should not be achievable with a collection of individual efforts or projects. Teams are encouraged to consider far-reaching objectives that will produce major advances in their fields. Applications that are mainly focused on the creation, expansion, and/or maintenance of community resources, creation of new technologies or infrastructure development are not appropriate for this FOA.

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Computer & Information Sciences

National Science Foundation - 19-553

Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are engineered systems that are built from, and depend upon, the seamless integration of computation and physical components. Advances in CPS will enable capability, adaptability, scalability, resiliency, safety, security, and usability that will expand the horizons of these critical systems. CPS technologies are transforming the way people interact with engineered systems, just as the Internet has transformed the way people interact with information. New, smart CPS drive innovation and competition in a range of application domains including agriculture, aeronautics, building design, civil infrastructure, energy, environmental quality, healthcare and personalized medicine, manufacturing, and transportation. Moreover, the integration of artificial intelligence with CPS creates new research opportunities with major societal implications. While tremendous progress has been made in advancing CPS technologies, the demand for innovation across application domains is driving the need to accelerate fundamental research to keep pace. At the same time, the CPS program seeks to open new vistas for the research community to think beyond the usual cyber-physical paradigms and structures and propose creative ideas to address the myriad challenges of today's systems as well as those of the future that have not yet been designed or fielded. The CPS program aims to develop the core research needed to engineer these complex CPS, some of which may also require dependable, high-confidence, or provable behaviors. Core research areas of the program includecontrol, data analytics, autonomy, design, information management, internet of things (IoT), mixed initiatives including human-in- or on-the-loop, networking, privacy, real-time systems, safety, security, and verification. By abstracting from the particulars of specific systems and application domains, the CPS program seeks to reveal cross-cutting, fundamental scientific and engineering principles that underpin the integration of cyber and physical elements across all application domains. The program additionally supports the development of methods, tools, and hardware and software components based upon these cross-cutting principles, along with validation of the principles via prototypes and testbeds. This program also fosters a research community that is committed to advancing education and outreach in CPSand accelerating the transition of CPS research into the real world. All proposals must include the following as part of the Project Description: AResearch Descriptionthat describes the technical rationaleand technical approach of the CPS research, including the challenges that drive the research problem and how the research integrates cyber and physical components.This section must also describe how the research outcomes are translational to other application domains. Specifically, it must include: A subsection titled "Intellectual Merit" A subsection called "CPSResearch Focus" that identifies and describes the specific core CPS researchareasbeing addressed in whichnovel and foundational research contributions are being made. An Evaluation/Experimentation Plan that describes how proposed concepts will be validated and outlines the metrics for success; A Project Management and Collaboration Plan that summarizes how the project team is ideally suited to realize the project goals and how the team will ensure effective collaboration; and A Broader Impacts sectionthat describes how the research will be disseminated to a broad and diverse audience. This should go beyond traditional academic publications and includes education and outreach from the research team spanning multiple levels of engagement. Broader Impacts encompasses Broadening Participation in Computing (BPC) and Engineering (BPE). In FY 2019, NSF is working closely with multiple agencies across the federal government, including the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T); the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Federal Highway Administration (FHWA); several National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and centers including the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Cancer Institute (NCI), and National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS); and the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA, hereafter referred to as NIFA). In addition, NSF is working closely with the German Research Foundation (DFG) to support joint U.S./German research projects in the Networked CPS area. Proposals for three classes of research and education projects—differing in scope and goals—will be considered through this solicitation: Small projects mayrequest a total budget of up to $500,000 for a period of up to 3 years. They are well suited to emerging new and innovative ideas that may have high impact on the field of CPS. Medium projects may request a total budget ranging from $500,001 to $1,200,000 for a period of up to 3 years. They are well suited to multi-disciplinary projects that accomplish clear goals requiring integrated perspectives spanning the disciplines. Frontier projects must address clearly identified critical CPS challenges that cannot be achieved by a set of smaller projects. Furthermore, Frontier projects should also look to push the boundaries of CPS well beyond today's systems and capabilities. Funding may be requested for a total of $1,200,001 to $7,000,000 for a period of 4 to 5 years. Note that the Frontier project submission window is different than that for Small and Medium projects.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-507

Required preliminary proposal due July 1.

In 2016, the National Science Foundation (NSF) unveiled a set of “Big Ideas,” 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering (see https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/big_ideas/index.jsp). One of these ideas, "The Quantum Leap: Leading the Next Quantum Revolution,” advances quantum technologies of the future: quantum computing, quantum communication, quantum simulations and quantum sensors. Recent advances in understanding and exploiting quantum mechanics are laying the foundation for generations of new discoveries that can benefit society in unforeseen ways. This "quantum revolution" requires a highly-trained workforce that can advance the envelope of what is possible, through research and development of practical solutions for quantum technologies. Academic faculty serve a vital role in the development of this workforce, by training the next generation of students while performing vital research. The disciplines of computer science (CS), information science (IS), and computer engineering (CE) are at the nexus of the interdisciplinary breakthroughs needed to design advanced quantum computing, modeling, communication and sensing technologies. NSF recognizes that there is inadequate research capacity in the CS/CE disciplines in the realm of Quantum Computing & Information Science (QCIS). The QCIS-Faculty Fellows (QCIS-FF) program therefore aims to grow academic research capacity in the computing and information science fields to support advances in quantum computing and/or communication over the long term. Specifically, QCIS-FF seeks to support departments and schools in U.S. institutions of higher educationthat conduct research and teaching in computer science, information science, and/or computer engineering, with the specific goal of encouraging hiring of tenure-track and tenured faculty in quantum computing and/or communication. Cross-disciplinary and multi-department hires are welcomed; however, intellectual ownership and primary assignment should be with the department primarily engaged in research and teaching activities for computer and information science and engineering. NSF funding will support the entire academic year salary and benefits of the newly recruited tenure-track or tenured faculty member for a duration of up to three years. Each proposal must request support for only one faculty position. Total budget is not to exceed $750,000 per proposal, with up to two awards per institution, across all departments in any given institution. Proposals in response to this solicitation are to be submitted by the department chair/head or his/her designee. The grants will be awarded as continuing grants, subject to assessment each year, and the funding will be released in one-year increments only if the award conditions are met, as noted in this solicitation. NSF strongly encourages proposals from universities that do not have established quantum computing and/or communication activities, as well as hires that foster cross-departmental synergies.

Agency Documentation

Air Force -- Research Lab - FA8650-18-S-6001

This effort is an open 2 Step BAA soliciting innovative research concepts for the overall mission of the Human-Centered Intelligence, Surveillance, & Reconnaissance (ISR) Division (711 HPW/RHX).The overall RHX research objective is to develop human-centered S&T that enables the Air Force to more effectively execute the ISR mission. This research objective is dual natured: (1) improve the capability to identify, track and locate human targets in the ISR environment and (2) improve the performance of humans who process, exploit, analyze, produce, and disseminate the ISR data and information. Human-centered ISR research encompasses three major research areas: (1) human signatures, (2) human trust and interaction and (3) human analyst augmentation. The human signatures research develops technologies to sense and exploit human bio-signatures at both the molecular level and macro (anthropometric) level. The human trust and interaction research develops technologies to improve human-to-human interactions as well as human-to- machine interactions. The human analyst augmentation research develops technologies to enhance analyst performance and to test the efficacy of newly developed technologies within a simulated operational environment.

National Institutes of Health - PAR-16-404

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) offers support for innovative research in biomedical informatics and data science. The scope of NLM's interest in the research domain of informatics is broad and interdisciplinary, developing methods and approaches in biomedical computing, data science and related information fields for application domains of health and biomedicine, including health care delivery, basic biomedical research, clinical and translational research, precision medicine, public health, biosurveillance, health information management in disasters, and similar areas. NLM defines biomedical informatics as the science of optimal representation, organization, management, integration and presentation of information relevant to human health and biology, for purposes of learning, sharing and use.

Agency Documentation

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Defense

This Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) for the Foundational Science Research Unit (FSRU) of the U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences (ARI) solicits new proposals for its fiscal year 2019 program of basic research in behavioral science. It is issued under the provisions of paragraph 6.102(d) (2) and 35.016 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), which provides for the acquisition of basic and applied research and that part of development not related to the development of a specific system or hardware procurement through the competitive selection of proposals and 10 U.S.C. 2358 and 10 U.S.C. 2371. Proposals submitted in response to this BAA and selected for award are considered to be the result of full and open competition and in full compliance with the provisions of Public Law 98- 369, Section 2701, "The Competition in Contracting Act of 1984" and subsequent amendments. ARI is the Army’s lead agency for the conduct of research, development, and analyses for the improvement of Army readiness and performance via research advances and applications of the behavioral and social sciences that address personnel, organization, and Soldier and leader development issues. ARI’s mission is to drive scientific innovation to enable the Army to acquire, develop, employ, and retain professional Soldiers and enhance personnel readiness. The mission of the Basic Research Program is to develop fundamental theories and investigate new domain areas in behavioral and social sciences with high potential impact on Army issues related to personnel readiness. In addition to looking for proposals that provide for programmatic efforts to develop and evaluate psychological and behavioral theory, we strongly encourage Applicants to propose novel, state-of-the-art, and multidisciplinary approaches that address difficult problems. A key consideration in the decision to support a research proposal is that its findings are likely to stimulate new, basic behavioral research which, in turn, will lead to improved performance of Army personnel and their units. ARI will not support proposals through this BAA that are primarily applied research projects (e.g., human factors studies or training program evaluations) or purely focused on physiology, psychopathology, or behavioral health. Collaboration is encouraged among institutions of higher education (IHE’s), non-profit organizations and commercial organizations. Funding of basic research proposals within ARI areas of interest will be determined by funding constraints and priorities set during each budget cycle. A proposal should describe its contribution to theory and how its results might lead to basic behavioral research that would be meaningful to the Army. Those contemplating submission of a proposal are encouraged to submit a White Paper before submitting a proposal. Submission of a White Paper before a proposal allows earliest determination of the potential for funding and minimizes the labor and cost associated with the submission of a proposal that may have minimal probability of being selected for funding. Costs associated with a White Paper or proposal submission in response to this BAA are not considered allowable direct charges to any resulting award. These costs may be allowable expenses to normal bid and proposal indirect costs specified in FAR 31.205-18. An Applicant submitting a proposal is cautioned that only a Government Contracting or Grants Officer may obligate the Government to any legal instrument involving expenditure of Government funds. The full announcement and application instructions may be accessed via the 'Related Documents' tab at the top of this page. The required forms may be accessed and submitted via the 'Package' tab at the top of this page. Agency Contacts: Contractual Point of Contact: Ms. Maria D. Nelson, maria.d.nelson.civ@mail.mil Technical Point of Contact: Dr. Alisha M. Ness, alisha.m.ness.civ@mail.mil

Air Force Office of Scientific Research - FOA-AFRL-AFOSR-2019-0002

See full announcement in Related Documents folder for detailed descriptions of the SPECIFIC MURI TOPICS.

Dept of the Army -- Materiel Command - W911NF-19-S-0008

The MURI program supports basic research in science and engineering at U.S. institutions of higher education (hereafter referred to as "universities") that is of potential interest to DoD. The program is focused on multidisciplinary research efforts where more than one traditional discipline interacts to provide rapid advances in scientific areas of interest to the DoD. As defined in the DoD Financial Management Regulation: Basic research is systematic study directed toward greater knowledge or understanding of the fundamental aspects of phenomena and of observable facts without specific applications towards processes or products in mind. It includes all scientific study and experimentation directed toward increasing fundamental knowledge and understanding in those fields of the physical, engineering, environmental, and life sciences related to long-term national security needs. It is farsighted high payoff research that provides the basis for technological progress (DoD 7000.14-R, vol. 2B, chap. 5, para. 050201.B).DoD’s basic research program invests broadly in many specific fields to ensure that it has early cognizance of new scientific knowledge. DoD’s basic research program invests broadly in many fields to ensure that it has early cognizance of new scientific knowledge.

Agency Documentation

Office of Naval Research - N00014-19-S-F005

See full announcement, in Related Documents folder, for detailed descriptions of the SPECIFIC MURI TOPICS.

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Education

National Institute of Food and Agriculture - USDA-NIFA-SAECP-006697

The Secondary Education, Two-Year Postsecondary Education, and Agriculture in the K-12 Classroom Challenge Grants (SPECA) program seeks to: (a) promote and strengthen secondary education and two-year postsecondary education in the food, agriculture, natural resources and human (FANH) sciences in order to help ensure the existence of a workforce in the United States that's qualified to serve the FANH sciences system; and (b) promote complementary and synergistic linkages among secondary, two-year postsecondary, and higher education programs in the FANH sciences in order to advance excellence in education and encourage more young Americans to pursue and complete a baccalaureate or higher degree in the FANH sciences.

Agency Documentation

Department of Education - ED-GRANTS-020119-001

Note: Each funding opportunity description is a synopsis ofinformation in the Federal Register application notice. For specificinformation about eligibility, please see the official application notice. Theofficial version of this document is the document published in the FederalRegister. Free Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Registerand the Code of Federal Regulations is available on GPO Access at:http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/index.html. Please review the officialapplication notice for pre-application and application requirements,application submission information, performance measures, priorities andprogram contact information. For the addresses for obtaining and submitting anapplication, please refer to our Common Instructions for Applicants toDepartment of Education Discretionary Grant Programs, published in the FederalRegister on February 12, 2018 (83 FR 6003) and available atwww.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2018-02-12/pdf/2018-02558.pdf. The EIR program,established under section 4611 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act,as amended (ESEA), provides funding to create, develop, implement, replicate,or take to scale entrepreneurial, evidence-based, field-initiated innovationsto improve student achievement and attainment for high-need students; andrigorously evaluate such innovations. The EIR program is designed to generateand validate solutions to persistent education challenges and to support theexpansion of those solutions to serve substantially larger numbers ofstudents. The central design element ofthe EIR program is its multi-tier structure that links the amount of funding anapplicant may receive to the quality of the evidence supporting the efficacy ofthe proposed project, with the expectation that projects that build thisevidence will advance through EIR's grant tiers: “Early-phase,” “Mid-phase,”and “Expansion.” Applicants proposing innovative practices that are supportedby limited evidence can receive relatively small grants to support thedevelopment, implementation, and initial evaluation of the practices;applicants proposing practices supported by evidence from rigorous evaluations,such as an experimental study (as defined in this notice), can receive largergrant awards to support expansion across the country. This structure providesincentives for applicants to: (1) Explore new ways of addressing persistentchallenges that other educators can build on and learn from; (2) build evidenceof effectiveness of their practices; and (3) replicate and scale successfulpractices in new schools, districts, and States while addressing the barriersto scale, such as cost structures and implementation fidelity. All EIR projects are expected to generate informationregarding their effectiveness in order to inform EIR grantees' efforts to learnabout and improve upon their efforts, and to help similar, non-EIR effortsacross the country benefit from EIR grantees' knowledge. By requiring that allgrantees conduct independent evaluations of their EIR projects, EIR ensuresthat its funded projects make a significant contribution to improving thequality and quantity of information available to practitioners and policymakersabout which practices improve student achievement and attainment, for whichtypes of students, and in what contexts. The Department awards three types of grants under this program:“Early-phase” grants, “Mid-phase” grants, and “Expansion” grants. These grantsdiffer in terms of the level of prior evidence of effectiveness required forconsideration for funding, the expectations regarding the kind of evidence andinformation funded projects should produce, the level of scale funded projectsshould reach, and, consequently, the amount of funding available to supporteach type of project. The Departmentexpects that Expansion grants will provide funding for implementation andrigorous evaluation of a program that has been found to produce sizable,significant impacts under a Mid-phase grant or other effort meeting similarcriteria, for the purposes of: (a) Determining whether such impacts can besuccessfully reproduced and sustained over time; and (b) identifying theconditions in which the program is most effective. Expansion grants are supported by evidencethat demonstrates a statistically significant effect on improving studentoutcomes or other relevant outcomes based on strong evidence (as defined inthis notice) from at least one well-designed and well-implemented experimentalstudy for at least one population and setting, and grantees are encouraged toimplement at the national level (as defined in this notice). This notice invites applications forExpansion grants only. The notices inviting applications for Early-phase andMid-phase grants are published elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register.

Agency Documentation

Department of Education - ED-GRANTS-020119-002

Note: Each funding opportunity description is a synopsis of information in the Federal Register application notice. For specific information about eligibility, please see the official application notice. The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register. Free Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations is available on GPO Access at: http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/index.html. Please review the official application notice for pre-application and application requirements, application submission information, performance measures, priorities and program contact information. For the addresses for obtaining and submitting an application, please refer to our Common Instructions for Applicants to Department of Education Discretionary Grant Programs, published in the Federal Register on February 12, 2018 (83 FR 6003) and available at www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2018-02-12/pdf/2018-02558.pdf. Purpose of Program: The EIR program, established undersection 4611 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended (ESEA),provides funding to create, develop, implement, replicate, or take to scaleentrepreneurial, evidence-based, field-initiated innovations to improve studentachievement and attainment for high-need students; and rigorously evaluate suchinnovations. The EIR program is designed to generate and validate solutions topersistent education challenges and to support the expansion of those solutionsto serve substantially larger numbers of students. The central design element of the EIR programis its multi-tier structure that links the amount of funding an applicant mayreceive to the quality of the evidence supporting the efficacy of the proposedproject, with the expectation that projects that build this evidence willadvance through EIR's grant tiers: “Early-phase,” “Mid-phase,” and “Expansion.”Applicants proposing innovative practices that are supported by limitedevidence can receive relatively small grants to support the development,implementation, and initial evaluation of the practices; applicants proposingpractices supported by evidence from rigorous evaluations, such as anexperimental study (as defined in this notice), can receive larger grant awardsto support expansion across the country. This structure provides incentives forapplicants to: (1) Explore new ways of addressing persistent challenges thatother educators can build on and learn from; (2) build evidence ofeffectiveness of their practices; and (3) replicate and scale successfulpractices in new schools, districts, and States while addressing the barriersto scale, such as cost structures and implementation fidelity. All EIR projects are expected to generateinformation regarding their effectiveness in order to inform EIR grantees'efforts to learn about and improve upon their efforts, and to help similar,non-EIR efforts across the country benefit from EIR grantees' knowledge. Byrequiring that all grantees conduct independent evaluations of their EIRprojects, EIR ensures that its funded projects make a significant contributionto improving the quality and quantity of information available to practitionersand policymakers about which practices improve student achievement andattainment, for which types of students, and in what contexts. The Department awards three types of grantsunder this program: “Early-phase” grants, “Mid-phase” grants, and “Expansion”grants. These grants differ in terms of the level of prior evidence ofeffectiveness required for consideration for funding, the expectationsregarding the kind of evidence and information funded projects should produce,the level of scale funded projects should reach, and, consequently, the amountof funding available to support each type of project. The Department expects that Mid-phase grantswill be used to fund implementation and a rigorous evaluation of a program thathas been successfully implemented under an Early-phase grant or other effortmeeting similar criteria, for the purpose of measuring the program's impact andcost-effectiveness, if possible using existing administrative data. Mid-phasegrants are supported by evidence that demonstrates a statistically significanteffect on improving student outcomes or other relevant outcomes based onmoderate evidence (as defined in this notice) from at least one well-designedand well-implemented experimental study for at least one population or setting,and grantees are encouraged to implement at the regional level (as defined inthis notice) or at the national level (as defined in this notice). This noticeinvites applications for Mid-phase grants only. The notices inviting applicationsfor Early-phase and Expansion grants are published elsewhere in this issue ofthe Federal Register.

Agency Documentation

Note: Each funding opportunity description is a synopsis of information in the Federal Register application notice. For specific information about eligibility, please see the official application notice. The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register. Free Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations is available on GPO Access at: http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/index.html. Please review the official application notice for pre-application and application requirements,application submission information, performance measures, priorities and program contact information. For the addresses for obtaining and submitting an application, please refer to our Common Instructions for Applicants to Department of Education Discretionary Grant Programs, published in the Federal Register on February 12, 2018 (83 FR 6003) and available at www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2018-02-12/pdf/2018-02558.pdf. Purpose of Program: The EIR program,established under section 4611 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act,as amended (ESEA), provides funding to create, develop, implement, replicate,or take to scale entrepreneurial, evidence-based, field-initiated innovations to improve student achievement and attainment for high-need students; and rigorously evaluate such innovations. The EIR program is designed to generate and validate solutions to persistent education challenges and to support the expansion of those solutions to serve substantially larger numbers of students. The central design element of the EIR program is its multi-tier structure that links the amount of funding an applicant may receive to the quality of the evidence supporting the efficacy of the proposed project, with the expectation that projects that build this evidence will advance through EIR's grant tiers: “Early-phase,” “Mid-phase,” and “Expansion.”Applicants proposing innovative projects that are supported by limited evidence can receive relatively small grants to support the development, implementation,and initial evaluation of the practices; applicants proposing projects supported by evidence from rigorous evaluations, such as an experimental study(as defined in this notice), can receive larger grant awards to support expansion across the country. This structure provides incentives for applicants to: (1) Explore new ways of addressing persistent challenges that other educators can build on and learn from; (2) build evidence of effectiveness of their practices; and (3) replicate and scale successful practices in new schools,districts, and States while addressing the barriers to scale, such as cost structures and implementation fidelity. All EIR projects are expected to generate information regarding their effectiveness in order to inform EIR grantees' efforts to learn about and improve upon their efforts, and to help similar, non-EIR efforts across the country benefit from EIR grantees' knowledge. By requiring that all grantees conduct independent evaluations of their EIR projects, EIR ensures that its funded projects make a significant contribution to improving the quality and quantity of information available to practitioners and policymakers about which practices improve student achievement and attainment, for which types of students, and in what contexts. The Department awards three types of grants under this program: “Early-phase” grants, “Mid-phase” grants,and “Expansion” grants. These grants differ in terms of the level of prior evidence of effectiveness required for consideration for funding, the expectations regarding the kind of evidence and information funded projects should produce, the level of scale funded projects should reach, and,consequently, the amount of funding available to support each type of project. Early-phase grants provide funding to support the development, implementation, and feasibility testing of a program, which prior research suggests has promise, for the purpose of determining whether the program can successfully improve student achievement and attainment for high-need students. Early-phase grants must demonstrate a rationale. These Early-phase grants are not intended simply to implement established practices in additional locations or address needs that are unique to one particular context. The goal is to determine whether and in what ways relatively newer practices can improve student achievement and attainment for high-need students. This notice invites applications for Early-phase grants only. The notices inviting applications for Mid-phase and Expansion grants are published elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 17-590

The fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) hold much promise as sectors of the economy where we can expect to see continuous vigorous growthin the coming decades. STEM job creation is expected to outpace non-STEM job creation significantly, according to the Commerce Department, reflecting the importance of STEM knowledge to the US economy. The National Science Foundation (NSF) plays a leadership role in development and implementation of efforts to enhance and improve STEM education in the United States. Through the NSF Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE) initiative, the agency continues to make a substantial commitment to the highest caliber undergraduate STEM education through a Foundation-wide framework of investments. The IUSE: EHR program is a core NSF undergraduate STEM education program that seeks to improve the effectiveness of undergraduate STEM education for both majors and non-majors. The program is open to application from all institutions of higher education and associated organizations. NSF places high value on educating students to be leaders and innovators in emerging and rapidly changing STEM fields as well as educating a scientifically literate populace. In pursuit of this goal, IUSE: EHR supports projects that have the potential to improve student learning in STEM through development of new curricular materials and methods of instruction, and development of new assessment tools to measure student learning. In addition to innovative work at the frontier of STEM education, this program also encourages replications of research studies at different types of institutions and with different student bodies to produce deeper knowledge about the effectiveness and transferability of findings. IUSE: EHR also seeks to support projects that have high potential for broader societal impacts, including improved diversity of students and instructors participating in STEM education, professional development for instructors to ensure adoption of new and effective pedagogical techniques that meet the changing needs of students, and projects that promote institutional partnerships for collaborative research and development. IUSE: EHR especially welcomes proposals that will pair well with the efforts of NSF INCLUDES (https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/nsfincludes/index.jsp) to develop STEM talent from all sectors and groups in our society. Collaborations are encouraged between IUSE proposals and existing INCLUDES projects, provided the collaboration strengthens both projects. For all the above objectives, the National Science Foundation invests primarily in evidence-based and evidence-generating approaches to understand and improve STEM learning and learning environments, improve the diversity of STEM students and majors, and prepare STEM majors for the workforce. In addition to contributing to STEM education in the host institution(s), proposals should have the promise of adding more broadly to our understanding of effective teaching and learning practices. The IUSE: EHR program recognizes and respects the variety of discipline-specific challenges and opportunities facing STEM faculty as they strive to incorporate results from educational research into classroom practice and work with education research colleagues and social science scholars to advance our understanding of effective teaching and learning. Toward these ends the program features two tracks: (1) Engaged Student Learning and (2) Institutional and Community Transformation. Two tiers of projects exist within each track: (i) Exploration and Design and (ii) Development and Implementation. Exploration and Design Development and Implementation Engaged Student Learning Up to $300K, for up to 3 years Level 1: Up to $600K, for up to 3 years Level 2: $601K-$2M, for up to 5 years Institutional and Community Transformation Up to $300K, for up to 3 years Up to $3M, for up to 5 years

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-17-221

The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research education activities in the mission areas of the NIH. The over-arching goal of this National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) R25 program is to support educational activities that enhance the diversity of the biomedical, behavioral and clinical research workforce.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 17-527

A well-educated science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce is a significant contributor to maintaining the competitiveness of the U.S. in the global economy. The National Science Foundation (NSF) Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) program addresses the need for a high quality STEM workforce in STEM disciplines supported by the program and for the increased success of low-income academically talented students with demonstrated financial need who are pursuing associate, baccalaureate, or graduate degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) [6], [16]. Recognizing that financial aid alone cannot increase retention and graduation in STEM, the program provides awards to Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) to fund scholarships and to advance the adaptation, implementation, and study of effective evidence-based curricular and co-curricular activities that support recruitment, retention, transfer (if appropriate), student success, academic/career pathways, and graduation in STEM. The S-STEM program encourages collaborations among different types of partners: Partnerships among different types of institutions; collaborations of STEM faculty and institutional, educational, and social science researchers; and partnerships among institutions of higher education and local business and industry, if appropriate. The program seeks: 1) to increase the number of low-income academically talented students with demonstrated financial need obtaining degrees in STEM and entering the workforce or graduate programs in STEM; 2) to improve the education of future scientists, engineers, and technicians, with a focus on academically talented low-income students; and 3) to generate knowledge to advance understanding of how factors or evidence-based curricular and co-curricular activities affect the success, retention, transfer, academic/career pathways, and graduation in STEM of low-income students. The STEM disciplines supported by the S-STEM program include: Biological sciences (except medicine and other clinical fields); Physical sciences (including physics, chemistry, astronomy, and materials science); Mathematical sciences; Computer and information sciences; Geosciences; Engineering; and Technology areas associated with the preceding disciplines (for example, biotechnology, chemical technology, engineering technology, information technology, etc.) The S-STEM program particularly encourages proposals from 2-year institutions, Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs), Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs), tribal colleges, and urban public and rural institutions.

Agency Documentation

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Energy

Office of Science - DE-FOA-0002054

The DOE SC program in Basic Energy Sciences (BES) announces its interest in receiving applications from single investigators/small groups (up to $500K per year) and from large teams (over $500K per year) for support of experimental and theoretical efforts to advance materials and chemical sciences research for quantum information science (QIS). Large teams must have multiple investigators and may have multiple institutions. This FOA is the second in this topical area for BES. In FY 2018, BES funded 27 awards under similar FOA. Additional information on these awards can be found at the websites listed in Supplementary Information. This funding opportunity supports fundamental research for public benefit in materials and chemical sciences to advance our understanding of quantum phenomena in systems that could be used for QIS, and the use of quantum computing in chemical and materials sciences research. Applications must focus on the Priority Research Opportunities for experimental and theoretical research identified in the BES Roundtable Reports, Basic Energy Sciences Roundtable on Opportunities for Quantum Computing in Chemical and Materials Sciences or Basic Energy Sciences Roundtable on Opportunities for Basic Research for Next-Generation Quantum Systems (https://science.energy.gov/~/media/bes/pdf/reports/2018/Quantum_computing.pdf and https://science.energy.gov/~/media/bes/pdf/reports/2018/Quantum_systems.pdf). Additional information on each topical area follows.

Office of Science - DE-FOA-0002019

SC hereby invites grant applications for support under the Early Career Research Program in the following program areas: Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR); Biological and Environmental Research (BER); Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES); High Energy Physics (HEP), and Nuclear Physics (NP). The purpose of this program is to support the development of individual research programs of outstanding scientists early in their careers and to stimulate research careers in the areas supported by SC.

Office of Science - DE-FOA-0001968

The Office of Science (SC) of the Department of Energy hereby announces its continuing interest in receiving grant applications for support of work in the following program areas: Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Basic Energy Sciences, Biological and Environmental Research, Fusion Energy Sciences, High Energy Physics, and Nuclear Physics. On September 3, 1992, DOE published in the Federal Register the Office of Energy Research Financial Assistance Program (now called the Office of Science Financial Assistance Program), 10 CFR 605, as a Final Rule, which contained a solicitation for this program. Information about submission of applications, eligibility, limitations, evaluation and selection processes and other policies and procedures are specified in 10 CFR 605. This FOA (DE-FOA-0001968) is our annual, broad, open solicitation that covers all of the research areas in the Office of Science and is open throughout the Fiscal Year. This FOA will remain open until September 30, 2019, 11:59 PM Eastern Time, or until it is succeeded by another issuance, whichever occurs first. This annual FOA (DE-FOA-0001968) succeeds FOA DE-FOA-0001820, which was published May 25, 2018.

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Engineering & Technology

DOT/Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration - FM-MHP-19-002

As the lead government agency responsible for the regulation and safety oversight of commercial motor vehicles (CMV), FMCSA awards HP-ITD funds to support innovative and impactful projects that advance its mission to reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities involving large trucks and buses. Funding is available for the support of innovative projects that improve safety and compliance with CMV regulations, are national in scope, demonstrate new technologies, and reduce the number of CMV crashes.These activities are supported in alignment with the U.S. Department of Transportations strategic goals of: •SAFETY:Reduce transportation-related fatalities and serious injuries across the transportation system.•INFRASTRUCTURE:Invest in infrastructure to ensure safety, mobility and accessibility and to stimulate economic growth, productivity and competitiveness for American workers and businesses.•INNOVATION:Lead in the development and deployment of innovative practices and technologies that improve the safety and performance of the Nations transportation system.•ACCOUNTABILITY:Serve the Nation with reduced regulatory burden and greater efficiency, effectiveness and accountability.

Agency Documentation

Air Force Office of Scientific Research - FA9550-19-S-0002

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) seeks unclassified proposals for research and development aimed at using lasers and other light source technology to develop applications in medicine, photobiology, surgery, and closely related materials sciences, with applications to combat casualty care and other military medical problems. This announcement is for a small number of individual awards. It is complementary to ongoing and future planed broad based awards, primarily directed toward university-based medical institutions, conducted by teams of physicians, biomedical scientists, physical scientists, and engineers. The efforts proposed may be basic or applied research, and must have direct relevance to combat casualty care or other military medical priorities. They must offer unique capabilities, not substantially funded by other DOD or other agency programs. Applicants must demonstrate substantial experience working to further military medical priorities, including transitioning research into clinical practice and working products. Substantial experience collaborating with military medical centers is also a requirement to establish relevance to combat casualty care or other military medical priorities, and facilitate the transition of research results to meet military needs.

National Science Foundation - 19-562

The ERC program is placing greater emphasis on research that leads to societal impact, including convergent approaches, engaging stakeholder communities, and strengthening team formation, in response to the NASEM study recommendations. The ERC program intends to support planning activities leading to convergent research team formation and capacity-building within the engineering community. This planning grant solicitation is designed to foster and facilitate the engineering community’s thinking about how to form convergent research collaborations. To participate in a forthcoming ERC competition, one is not required to submit a planning grant proposal nor to receive a planning grant.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-506

The Partnerships for Innovation (PFI) Program within the Division of Industrial Innovation and Partnerships (IIP) offers researchers from all disciplines of science and engineering funded by NSF the opportunity to perform translational research and technology development, catalyze partnerships and accelerate the transition of discoveries from the laboratory to the marketplace for societal benefit. PFI has five broad goals, as set forth by the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act of 2017 (“the Act”, S.3084 — 114th Congress; Sec. 602. Translational Research Grants): (1) identifying and supporting NSF-sponsored research and technologies that have the potential for accelerated commercialization; (2) supporting prior or current NSF-sponsored investigators, institutions of higher education, and non-profit organizations that partner with an institution of higher education in undertaking proof-of-concept work, including the development of technology prototypes that are derived from NSF-sponsored research and have potential market value; (3) promoting sustainable partnerships between NSF-funded institutions, industry, and other organizations within academia and the private sector with the purpose of accelerating the transfer of technology; (4) developing multi-disciplinary innovation ecosystems which involve and are responsive to the specific needs of academia and industry; (5) providing professional development, mentoring, and advice in entrepreneurship, project management, and technology and business development to innovators. In addition, PFI responds to the mandate set by Congress in Section 601(c)(3) of the Act (Follow-on Grants), to support prototype or proof-of-concept development work by participants, including I-Corps participants, with innovations that because of the early stage of development are not eligible to participate in a Small Business Innovation Research Program or a Small Business Technology Transfer Program. Finally, PFI seeks to implement the mandate set by Congress in Section 102(c)(a) of the Act (Broader Impacts Review Criterion Update) by enhancing partnerships between academia and industry in the United States, and expanding the participation of women and individuals from underrepresented groups in innovation, technology translation, and entrepreneurship. This solicitation offers two broad tracks for proposals in pursuit of the aforementioned goals: The Technology Translation (PFI-TT) track offers the opportunity to translate prior NSF-funded research results in any field of science or engineering into technological innovations with promising commercial potential and societal impact. PFI-TT supports commercial potential demonstration projects for academic research outputs in any NSF-funded science and engineering discipline. This demonstration is achieved through proof-of-concept, prototyping, technology development and/or scale-up work. Concurrently, students and postdoctoral researchers who participate in PFI-TT projects receive education and leadership training in innovation and entrepreneurship. Successful PFI-TT projects generate technology-driven commercialization outcomes that address societal needs. The Research Partnerships (PFI-RP) track seeks to achieve the same goals as the PFI-TT track by supporting instead complex, multi-faceted technology development projects that are typically beyond the scope of a single researcher or institution and require a multi-organizational, interdisciplinary, synergistic collaboration. A PFI-RP project requires the creation of partnerships between academic researchers and third-party organizations such as industry, non-academic research organizations, federal laboratories, public or non-profit technology transfer organizations or other universities. Such partnerships are needed to conduct applied research on a stand-alone larger project toward commercialization and societal impact. In the absence of such synergistic partnership, the project’s likelihood for success would be minimal. The intended outcomes of both PFI-TT and PFI-RP tracks are: a) the commercialization of new intellectual property derived from NSF-funded research outputs; b) the creation of new or broader collaborations with industry (including increased corporate sponsored research); c) the licensing of NSF-funded research outputs to third party corporations or to start-up companies funded by a PFI team; and d) the training of future innovation and entrepreneurship leaders. WEBINARS: Webinars will be held to answer questions about the solicitation. Registration will be available on the NSF Partnerships for Innovation website (https://www.nsf.gov/PFI). Potential proposers and their partners are encouraged to attend.

Agency Documentation

The Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI) program of the NSF Directorate for Engineering (ENG) serves a critical role in helping ENG focus on important emerging areas in a timely manner. This solicitation is a funding opportunity for interdisciplinary teams of researchers to embark on rapidly advancing frontiers of fundamental engineering research. For this solicitation, we will consider proposals that aim to investigate emerging frontiers in one of the following two research areas: Chromatin and Epigenetic Engineering (CEE) Continuum, Compliant, and Configurable Soft Robotics Engineering(C3 SoRo) This solicitationwill becoordinated with the Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO) and the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE). EFRI seeks proposals with transformative ideas that represent an opportunity for a significant shift in fundamental engineering knowledge with a strong potential for long term impact on national needs or a grand challenge. The proposals must also meet the detailed requirements delineated in this solicitation. FURTHER INFORMATION: Further information about the EFRI program may be obtained by viewing the slides from the FY18 EFRIinformational webinar. Please clickhereto view the FY18 slides.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-503

The ERC program supports convergent research that will lead to strong societal impact. Each ERC has interacting foundational components that go beyond the research project, including engineering workforce development at all participant stages, a culture of diversity and inclusion where all participants gain mutual benefit, and value creation within an innovation ecosystem that will outlast the lifetime of the ERC. The logical reasoning that links the proposed activities to the identified goals for each ERC should be clear.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - PD-19-072Y

The Engineering Design and Systems Engineering (EDSE) program supports fundamental research into the basic processes and phenomena of engineering design and systems engineering. The program seeks proposals leading to improved understanding about how processes, organizational structure, social interactions, strategic decision making, and other factors impact success in the planning and execution of engineering design and systems engineering projects. It also supports advances pertaining to engineering design and systems engineering in areas that include, but are not limited to, decision making under uncertainty, including preference and demand modeling; problem decomposition and decision delegation; applications of reverse game theory (mechanism design); computer-aided design; design representation; system performance modeling and prediction; design optimization; uncertainty quantification; domain- or concern-specific design methods; and advanced computational techniques for supporting effective human cognition, decision making, and collaboration. Competitive proposals for novel methods will include a plan to evaluate rigorously the effectiveness and performance of the proposed approach. The EDSE program encourages multidisciplinary collaborations of experts in design and systems engineering with experts in other domains. Of particular interest is research on the design of engineering material systems that leverages the unique aspects of a particular material system to realize advanced design methods that are driven by performance metrics and incorporate processing/manufacturing considerations. The EDSE program does not support the development of ad-hoc approaches that lack grounding in theory, nor does it support design activities that do not advance scientific knowledge about engineering design or systems engineering. Prospective investigators are encouraged to discuss research ideas and project scope with the Program Director in advance of proposal preparation and submission.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - PD-18-7643

TheEnvironmental Sustainabilityprogram is part of theEnvironmental Engineering and Sustainabilitycluster, which also includes 1) Environmental Engineering; and 2) Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials. Thegoal of theEnvironmental Sustainabilityprogram is to promote sustainable engineered systems that support human well-being and that are also compatible with sustaining natural (environmental) systems.These systems provide ecological services vital for human survival.Research efforts supported by the program typically consider long time horizons and may incorporate contributions from the social sciences and ethics. The program supports engineering research that seeks to balance society's need to provide ecological protection and maintain stable economic conditions. There are four principal general research areas that are supported: IndustrialEcology: Topics of interest inIndustrial Ecologyinclude advancements in modeling such as life cycle assessment, materials flow analysis, input/output economic models, and novel metrics for measuringsustainable systems.Innovations in industrial ecology are encouraged. Green Engineering: Research is encouraged to advance the sustainability ofmanufacturing processes, green buildings, andinfrastructure.Many programs in the Engineering Directorate supportresearch in environmentally benign manufacturing or chemicalprocesses.The Environmental Sustainability program supportsresearch that would affect more than one chemical or manufacturing processor that takes a systems or holistic approach to green engineering for infrastructure or green buildings.Improvements in distribution and collection systems that will advance smart growth strategies andameliorate effects of growth are research areas that are supported by Environmental Sustainability.Innovations in management of storm water,recycling and reuse of drinking water, and other greenengineering techniques to support sustainability may also be fruitfulareas for research.NOTE: Water treatment proposals are to besubmitted to the CBET Environmental Engineering program (1440), NOT the Environmental Sustainability program (7643). Ecological Engineering:Topics should focus on the engineering aspects ofrestoring ecological function to natural systems.Engineering research in the enhancement of natural capital to foster sustainabledevelopment is encouraged. Earth Systems Engineering: Earth systems engineeringconsiders aspects of large scale engineering research that involve mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions, adaptation to climate change, and other global scaleconcerns. All proposed research should be driven by engineering principles, and be presented explicitly in an environmental sustainability context. Proposals should include involvement in engineering research of at least one graduate student, as well as undergraduates.Incorporation of aspects of social, behavioral, and economic sciences is welcomed. Innovative proposals outside the scope of the four core areas mentioned above may be considered. However, prior to submission, it is recommended that the PI contact the Program Director to avoid the possibility of the proposal being returned without review. For proposals that call for research to be done outside of the United States, an explanation must be presented of the potential benefit of the research for the United States. The duration of unsolicited awards is generally one to three years.The typical award size for the program is around $100,000 per year. Proposals requesting a substantially higher amountthan this, without prior consultation with the Program Director, may be returned without review. INFORMATION COMMON TO MOST CBET PROGRAMS Proposals should address the novelty and/orpotentially transformative natureof the proposed work compared to previous work in the field.Also, it is important to address why the proposed work is important in terms of engineering science, as well as to also project the potential impact on society and/or industry of success in the research.The novelty or potentially transformative nature of the research should be included, as a minimum, in the Project Summary of each proposal. Faculty Early Career Development(CAREER)program proposals are strongly encouraged. Award duration is five years.The submission deadline for Engineering CAREER proposals is in July every year. Please see the CAREER URLherefor more information. Proposals for Conferences, Workshops, and Supplements: PIs are strongly encouraged to discuss their requests with the Program Director before submission of the proposal. Grants forRapid Response Research(RAPID)andEArly-concept Grants for Exploratory Research(EAGER)are also considered when appropriate. Please note that proposals of these types must be discussed with the program director before submission.Further details are available in theProposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide(PAPPG)download found here.Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry (GOALI)proposals that integrate fundamental research with translational results and are consistent with the application areas of interest to each program are also encouraged. Please note that GOALI proposals must be submitted during the annual unsolicited proposal window for each program. More information on GOALI can be foundhere. COMPLIANCE: Proposals which are not compliant with theProposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide (PAPPG)will be returned without review.

Agency Documentation

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Geosciences

National Science Foundation - 19-561

The Division of Earth Sciences (EAR) will consider proposals for the development of cyberinfrastructure (CI) for the Earth Sciences (Geoinformatics). EAR-supported geoinformatics opportunities will fit into three tracks: Catalytic track, Facility track, and Sustainability track. These tracks broadly support the lifecycle of geoinformatics resource development, from pilots (Catalytic) to broad implementation (Facility) to sunsetting and long-term sustainability (Sustainability). The GI Catalytic Track will support pilot geoinformatics development efforts that are intended to serve Earth Sciences research. The GI Facility Track will support awards for implementation and operation of a cyberinfrastructure resource relied upon by one or more Earth Science communities to address science questions. The GI Sustainability Track will support development and implementation of sustainable funding models to preserve data and software products of value to Earth Science research.

Agency Documentation

Department of Commerce - NOAA-OAR-SG-2019-2005960

The National Sea Grant College Program (Sea Grant) was enacted by U.S. Congress in 1966 (amended in 2008, Public Law 110-394) to support leveraged federal and state partnership that harness the intellectual capacity of the nation’s universities and research institutions to solve problems and generate opportunities in coastal communities. Sea Grant anticipates $1,500,000 will be available to support Sea Grant-led aquaculture projects to catalyze work in a range of topics or geographies. This competition will fund diverse, and at times, high-risk, developmental projects that will envision, explore and advance aquaculture opportunities where a minimal foundation currently exists. Projects may focus on diverse topics (e.g. adapting to environmental change; innovative species, technologies, or locations; community engagement; or traditional/ indigenous practices) and/or geographies (e.g. region of the country; state vs. federal waters; tropical; Great Lakes or cold-water) that are innovative, under-explored or would otherwise benefit from a focused developmental effort. Proposals should bring experts together in projects to identify needs and gaps in the target area. These projects may support tool development, workshops, education, outreach, business planning, and/or trainings addressing geographic or topical aquaculture issues. Potential topics include those which have been identified in Sea Grant’s national focus area of Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture (SFA), the Sea Grant Network 10-year Aquaculture Vision, and in other NOAA and Department of Commerce aquaculture goals. This document sets out requirements for submitting to NOAA-OAR-SG-2019-2005960. Additional guidance and tips on how best to prepare an application are provided in the Sea Grant General Application Guide available at (https://seagrant.noaa.gov/Portals/1/Guidance/SeaGrantGeneralApplicationGuide.pdf).

Department of Commerce - NOAA-OAR-SG-2019-2005953

The National Sea Grant College Program (Sea Grant) was enacted by U.S. Congress in 1966 (amended in 2008, Public Law 110-394) to support leveraged federal and state partnership that harness the intellectual capacity of the nation’s universities and research institutions to solve problems and generate opportunities in coastal communities. The National Sea Grant Office anticipates around $3,000,000 will be available to support research to address critical gaps in social, behavioral, and economic knowledge as it relates to U.S. aquaculture and the communities impacted and served by it. The initiative is informed by the National Strategic Plan for Federal Aquaculture Research; the Sea Grant 10-Year NOAA Sea Grant Aquaculture Vision; and previous research from federal, state, and university scientists. This document sets out requirements for submitting to NOAA-OAR-SG-2019-2005953. Additional guidance and tips on how best to prepare an application are provided in the Sea Grant General Application Guide available at (https://seagrant.noaa.gov/Portals/1/Guidance/SeaGrantGeneralApplicationGuide.pdf).

Department of Commerce - NOAA-OAR-SG-2019-2005963

The National Sea Grant College Program (Sea Grant) was enacted by U.S. Congress in 1966 (amended in 2008, Public Law 110-394) to support leveraged federal and state partnership that harness the intellectual capacity of the nation’s universities and research institutions to solve problems and generate opportunities in coastal communities. Sea Grant anticipates at least $9,000,000 will be available to support the establishment of collaborative programs to build the capacity of Sea Grant and its partners to advance aquaculture in areas where a foundation of knowledge and activity currently exists but where significant barriers to sustainable domestic marine and Great Lakes aquaculture remain. These collaborative programs will serve as geographic or topic-based hubs for fully integrated, transdisciplinary research, outreach, and education that will provide broad, non-proprietary support and investment for building and/or enhancing an aquaculture industry. These investments should be consistent with Sea Grant’s focus area of Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture (SFA) and the Sea Grant Network 10-year Aquaculture Vision and in support of NOAA and Department of Commerce aquaculture goals. Proposals to this competition must be submitted by a Sea Grant Program, include industry partners and be for up to three years in duration. It is Sea Grant’s intent (pending appropriations) that successful collaborative programs will be eligible to compete for additional future funding to address priority gaps and emerging challenges identified through the collaborative programs in support of industry and societal needs. This document sets out requirements for submitting to NOAA-OAR-SG-2019-2005963. Additional guidance and tips on how best to prepare an application are provided in the Sea Grant General Application Guide available at (https://seagrant.noaa.gov/Portals/1/Guidance/SeaGrantGeneralApplicationGuide.pdf)

The Eppley Foundation for Research

Particular areas of interest include innovative medical investigations, climate change, whole ecosystem studies, as well as research on single species if they are of particular significance in their environments, in the U.S. and abroad.

Letters of inquiry and grant proposals should be written in language clear to the layman. LOIs, not to exceed 1,000 words, should be received by September 15th or March 15th.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-545

The Distributed Arrays of Small Instruments (DASI) solicitation is designed to address the increasing need for high spatial and temporal resolution measurements to determine the local, regional, and global scale processes that are essential for addressing the fundamental questions insolar and space physics. This solicitation will be formally divided into two tracks: 1) development of instrumentation for future deployment in arrays and 2) deployment and operation of existing instruments in distributed arrays.This DASI solicitation emphasizes both strong scientific merit and a well-developed plan for student training and involvement of a diverse workforce.

Agency Documentation

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Law, Justice & Human Rights

National Institute of Justice - NIJ-2019-15283

With this solicitation, NIJ seeks applications for funding of multidisciplinary research projects addressing three topics: 1) The impact of fatigue and stress on officer performance. 2) Enhancing strategies for officer interaction with mentally ill individuals. 3) Advancing Resiliency for the Forensic Workforce- Understanding the Impact and Management of Stress, Burnout, and Vicarious Trauma. This solicitation supports the U.S. Department of Justice’s priority of protecting officers and other public safety personnel. This solicitation also supports the following five objectives of the NIJ Safety, Health, and Wellness Strategic Research Plan 2016-2021 (August 2016): 1) Objective I.2: Support development, and promote strategies, policies, practices, and technologies that enhance the safety of criminal justice personnel. 2) Objective I.4: Develop policies, strategies, and technologies to promote safety in criminal justice interactions with the public. 3) Objective II.1: Promote research to improve the physical and mental health of individuals working in the criminal justice system. 4) Objective II.2: Study both trauma and suicide among criminal justice employees. 5) Objective II.4: Promote science-based tools and strategies to monitor physical and mental health.

Agency Documentation

National Institute of Justice - NIJ-2019-15588

This is a new solicitation undertaken this year to address the administration’s interest in better understanding the nexus of crime and immigration, both legal and illegal. This will involve research on the contributions of illegal immigrants to violent crime and other forms of crime as compared to legal immigrants and native populations – to include subcategories of illegal immigrants and crimes. It will also include research on how illegal immigrants are processed through the criminal justice system relative to other population; as well as research on enforcement activities and crime in 287(g) jurisdictions that have entered into agreements with ICE to delegate immigration authorities to local law enforcement.

Agency Documentation

National Institute of Justice - NIJ-2019-15594

NIJ is seeking applications for the development of a validated instrument for users of victim services to assess outcomes such as, but not limited to, satisfaction, needs addressed, additional needs identified and referrals. This solicitation is focused on the development of a validated, multi-lingual tool, as well as a platform for easy distribution. The project is not to exceed a 36-month period of performance. This solicitation supports the U.S. Department of Justice’s priority of reducing victimization by examining interventions that may be effective in reducing revictimization and supporting victim needs.

Agency Documentation

National Institute of Justice - NIJ-2019-15288

NIJ is seeking applications for the funding of research and program evaluation projects that inform efforts to prevent and reduce intentional, interpersonal firearm violence and public mass shootings in the United States. NIJ will support scientifically rigorous research and evaluation projects designed to strengthen the knowledge base and produce findings with the high practical utility to improve public safety. While NIJ will consider applications for relevant, scientifically rigorous research and evaluation projects designed to produce findings that address firearm violence, NIJ is particularly interested in applications in the following four areas: (1) Evaluate prevention or intervention programs and/or policies aiming to reduce firearm violence; (2) Examine the defensive use of firearms and its impact on firearm violence; (3) Examine the impact of plea bargaining firearm charges on firearm violence, and (4) Improve the understanding of mass shooters and mass shooting incidents to inform prevention efforts at a local level. This solicitation supports the U.S. Department of Justice’s priority to prevent and reduce gun crimes, gun violence related victimization, and the wide range of criminal activities related to firearm violence.

Agency Documentation

National Institute of Justice - NIJ-2019-15231

With this solicitation, NIJ continues to build upon its research and evaluation efforts to better understand, prevent, and respond to trafficking in persons in the United States. Applicants should propose research projects that-first and foremost-have clear implications for criminal justice policy and practice in the United States. This year, NIJ is particularly interested in research responding to the following priority areas: 1) Labor trafficking 2) Phased evaluation, not to exceed a 24-month period of performance. 3) Outcome evaluation of trafficking focused victim service providers 4) Develop a better understanding of traffickers Strong applications that address human trafficking in the U.S. in a criminal justice context that fall outside these priority areas may also be considered.

Agency Documentation

Office of Acquisitions Management - SFOP0005607

The U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor (DRL) announces an open competition for organizations interested in submitting applications for projects to promote international labor standards and women's right to equal, safe, and full participation in the workforce.

Agency Documentation

Office on Violence Against Women - OVW-2019-16029

The purpose of the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW)'s Research and Evaluation (R&E) Initiative is to research and evaluate approaches to combating domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking. By generating more knowledge about strategies for holding offenders accountable and serving victims, communities that benefit from Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) funding will be better equipped to align their work with practices that are known to be effective, and they will be more capable of generating empirical knowledge on the efficacy of new and promising ways of doing things. R&E is designed to support researcher-practitioner partnerships and a broad range of research and evaluation methods, including qualitative, mixed-method, and quasi-experimental designs.

Agency Documentation

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Mathematics & Physical Sciences

NASA Headquarters - 80HQTR19NOA01-19ECF-B1

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Headquarters has released a solicitation, titled Early Career Faculty (ECF), as an appendix to the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) umbrella NASA Research Announcement (NRA) titled "Space Technology Research, Development, Demonstration, and Infusion 2019 (SpaceTech-REDDI-2019), on March 13, 2019. The solicitation is available by opening the NSPIRES homepage at http://nspires.nasaprs.com/ , selecting "Solicitations," then selecting "Open Solicitations," and, finally, selecting "Early Career Faculty (ECF).” STMD, and the Space Technology Research Grants (STRG) Program in particular, seek proposals from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of their outstanding new faculty members who intend to develop academic careers related to space technology. NASA is seeking proposals that plan to pursue innovative, early-stage space technology research in the topic areas specifically enumerated in the solicitation. Our Nation’s universities couple fundamental research with education, encouraging a culture of innovation based on the discovery of knowledge. Universities are, therefore, ideally positioned to both conduct fundamental space technology research and diffuse newly-found knowledge into society at large through graduate students and industrial, government, and other partnerships. STMD investments in space technology research at U.S. universities promote the continued leadership of our universities as an international symbol of the country's scientific innovation, engineering creativity, and technological skill. These investments also create, fortify, and nurture the talent base of highly skilled engineers, scientists, and technologists to improve America’s technological and economic competitiveness. The following topics are anticipated for the final appendix: Advancing Human-Robot Teams for Space Exploration; Terrain Mapping and Processing Algorithms; Intelligent Calibration of Constellations of Sensors; Advanced Thermal control Materials for Exploration Spacecraft. Only accredited U.S. universities are eligible to submit proposals on behalf of their outstanding new faculty members who intend to develop academic careers related to space technology. The proposed research must be led by a single, eligible Principal Investigator (PI). The PI must be an untenured Assistant Professor on the tenure track at the sponsoring U.S. university at the time of award. The PI must be a U.S. citizen or have lawful status of permanent residency. The PI must be the primary researcher on the effort; Co-Investigators are not permitted. Collaborators (other than NASA civil servants/JPL) are permitted. See the solicitation (Section 3.0) for complete requirements regarding eligibility and for definitions and restrictions regarding collaborators. A PI may submit only one proposal in response to this appendix. NASA encourages submission of ECF proposals on behalf of early career faculty members at all U.S. universities and especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities. The financial and programmatic support for ECF comes from the Space Technology Research Grants Program within the Space Technology Mission Directorate. Awards are planned to start in November 2019. NASA plans to make approximately 6-8 awards as a result of this ECF solicitation, subject to the receipt of meritorious proposals and the availability of funds. The actual number of awards will depend on the quality of the proposals received; NASA reserves the right to make no awards under this solicitation. All proposals must be submitted electronically through NSPIRES or through Grants.gov (www.grants.gov) by an authorized organizational representative. Notices of Intent are strongly encouraged by April 3, 2019. Proposals are due on or before May 1, 2019. Detailed submission instructions are provided in the solicitation. Potential proposers and their proposing organizations are urged to familiarize themselves with the submission system(s), ensure they are registered in NSPIRES, and submit the required proposal materials well in advance of the deadline. Technical and programmatic comments and questions may be addressed by e-mail to the Space Technology Research Grants Program Executive, Claudia Meyer, at hq-ecf-call@mail.nasa.gov. Procurement questions may be addressed by e-mail to the acquisition point of contact on this solicitation, Kimberly Cone, at hq-ecf-call@mail.nasa.gov. Responses to inquiries will be answered by e-mail and may also be included in the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) documents located on the NSPIRES page associated with the solicitation; anonymity of persons/institutions who submit questions will be preserved.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-532

In 2016, the National Science Foundation (NSF) unveiled a set of “Big Ideas,” 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering (seehttps://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/big_ideas/index.jsp). The Big Ideas represent unique opportunities to position our Nation at the cutting edge of global science and engineering leadership by bringing together diverse disciplinary perspectives to support convergence research. As such, when responding to this solicitation, even though proposals must be submitted to the Directorate for Mathematical & Physical Sciences/Office of Multidisciplinary Activities (MPS/OMA),once received, the proposals will be managed by a cross-disciplinary team of NSF Program Directors. The Quantum Idea Incubator for Transformational Advances in Quantum Systems (QII - TAQS) program is designed to support interdisciplinary teams that will explore highly innovative, original, and potentially transformative ideas for developing and applying quantum science, quantum computing, and quantum engineering. Proposals with the potential to deliver new concepts, new platforms, and/or new approaches that will accelerate the science, computing, and engineering of quantum technologies are encouraged. Breakthroughs in quantum sensing, quantum communications, quantum simulations, or quantum computing systems are anticipated. This Quantum Idea Incubator solicitation aims to support the process of translating such ideas into reality. This solicitation calls for proposals focused on interdisciplinary research that includes elements from the following thrust areas: (i) fundamental science such as, but not limited to, physics, chemistry, materials science, mathematics, biology, or geoscience, as well as foundational concepts and techniques in quantum information science and engineering; (ii) communication, computation, and modeling; and (iii) devices and engineered systems. Proposals must articulate how the project leverages and/or promotes advances in knowledge in the selected thrust areas. Proposals should be innovative and must focus on quantum functionality and must result in experimental demonstrations and/or transformative advances towards quantum systems and/or proof-of-concept validations. Competitive proposals will come from an interdisciplinary research team led by at least three investigators who collectively contribute synergistic expertise from one or more engineering domains, from mathematics, computational and/or computer and information science, and from one or more physical, chemical, biological, or materials science domains. Proposals will be judged on how likely the integrated effort is to lead to transformative advances in quantum systems. Both fundamental and applied topics are encouraged.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-526

Materials Innovation Platforms (MIP) is a mid-scale infrastructure program in the Division of Materials Research (DMR) designed to accelerate advances in materials research. MIPs respond to the increasing complexity of materials research that requires close collaboration of interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary teams and access to cutting edge tools. These tools in a user facility benefit both a user program and in-house research, which focus on addressing grand challenges of fundamental science and meet national needs. MIPs embrace the paradigm set forth by the Materials Genome Initiative (MGI), which strives to “discover, manufacture, and deploy advanced materials twice as fast, at a fraction of the cost,” and conduct research through iterative “closed-loop” efforts among the areas of materials synthesis/processing, materials characterization, and theory/modeling/simulation. In addition, they are expected to engage the emerging field of data science in materials research. Each MIP is a scientific ecosystem, which includes in-house research scientists, external users and other contributors who, collectively, form a community of practitioners and share tools, codes, samples, data and know-how. The knowledge sharing is designed to strengthen collaborations among scientists and enable them to work in new ways, fostering new modalities of research and education/training, for the purpose of accelerating discovery and development of new materials and novel materials phenomena/properties, as well as fostering their eventual deployment. The scientific focus of the MIP program is subject to change from competition to competition. The first MIP competition in 2015 focused on developing new bulk and thin-film crystalline hard materials. The second MIP competition, in 2019, focuses on the convergence of materials research with biological sciences for developing new materials.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-517

Required preliminary proposal due June 24.

The Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers (MRSECs) program provides sustained support of interdisciplinary materials research and education of the highest quality while addressing fundamental problems in science and engineering. Each MRSEC addresses research of a scope and complexity requiring the scale, synergy, and multidisciplinarity provided by a campus-based research center. The MRSECs support materials research infrastructure in the United States, promote active collaboration between universities and other sectors, including industry and international organizations, and contribute to the development of a national network of university-based centers in materials research, education, and facilities. A MRSEC may be located at a single institution, or may involve multiple institutions in partnership, and is composedof up to three Interdisciplinary Research Groups, IRGs, each addressing a fundamental materials science topic aligned with the Division of Materials Research, DMR.

Agency Documentation

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Social Sciences

Sociological Initiatives Foundation

The Sociological Initiatives Foundation is dedicated to the belief that research and action are intrinsically inseparable. We invite concept proposals for projects that link an explicit research design to a concrete social action strategy. Projects should also have clear social change goals.

SIF has funded projects in the areas of civic participation, community organizing, crime and law, education, health, housing, immigration, labor organizing, and language/literacy.

Some examples of desired applicants are:

community-led academic partnerships
advocacy or community groups that conduct research that can withstand challenge in academic and policy arenas
academics that organize or link to a constituency through their research
A limited number of concept applicants will be invited to submit full proposals in the fall of 2019.

Projects typically take two years, so applicants should think in terms of such a timeline.

Complete guidelines, information on past funded projects, and the on-line concept application are available on this site using the links above.

Agency Documentation

Craig H. Neilsen Foundation

The Craig H. Neilsen Foundation invites letters of intent for Psychosocial Research (PSR) Projects that addresses the interrelation of behavior, social, psychological and other quality of life factors that will benefit people living with spinal cord injury. One or more awards of up to $400,000 each may be made. Eligibility is restricted to institutions of higher education and nonprofit organizations. Letters of intent are due Mar 25. More information is available at: http://chnfoundation.org/psychosocial-research/.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - RFA-AA-19-006

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), issued by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), encourages Research Project Grant (R01) applications proposing to conduct mechanistic studies on the relationships between sleep problems and alcohol dependence. A major impediment for recovery from alcohol use disorder (AUD) is the persistent sleep problems during abstinence promoting relapse. The objective of this FOA is to promote research in animal models and human subjects on the reciprocal relationships between chronic alcohol use and sleep disruptions. The major goal is to understand the underlying mechanisms that will lead to improved treatments for alcohol dependence. NIAAA strongly encourages collaborative efforts between experts in sleep research and established alcohol investigators to facilitate the development of proposals incorporating both areas of research.

Agency Documentation

Health Resources and Services Administration - HRSA-19-038

Provides financial and technical assistance to State and local public health agencies and other public or private nonprofit entities for HIV service-related projects which meet the criteria for funding and target one of the specified priority areas.

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Other/Interdisciplinary

National Science Foundation - PD-19-7680

NSF seeks to strengthen the future U.S. Engineering workforce by enabling the participation of all citizens through the support of research in the science of Broadening Participation in Engineering (BPE). The BPE program is a dedicated to supporting the development of a diverse and well-prepared engineering workforce. BPE focuses on enhancing the diversity and inclusion of all underrepresented populations in engineering, including gender identity and expression, race and ethnicity (African Americans/Blacks, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Native Pacific Islanders), disability, LGBTQ+, first generation college and socio-economic status. BPE funds research to Understand and analyze the systemic barriers that prevent underrepresented groups from pursuing and succeeding in engineering, for example, understand the problem of insufficient interest and poorly sustained participation in engineering across underrepresented demographic groups; insignificant preparation and scarce opportunities for members of underrepresented groups to learn meaningful, relevant engineering content. Understand and analyze factors that enhance our ability to increase access to engineering by creating support systems and social networks that raise career awareness about different engineering pathways. Develop innovative methods and projects to significantly impact the recruitment and retention of engineering students from underrepresented groups. Activities must be supported by relevant data and have the capability to produce a model that can be replicated in other contexts. Develop innovative methods and projects to aggressively recruit and retain tenure track faculty from underrepresented groups. Design and transform culture to make diversity, equity, and inclusion a priority in the engineering enterprise. BPE research activities will provide scientific evidence that engineering educators, employers, and policy makers need to make informed decisions to design effective programs that broaden the participation of persons from historically underrepresented groups in the engineering workforce. BPE is interested in funding research that spans K-12 to workforce and offers the greatest return on investment. BPE funded research should produce outcomes that are scalable, sustainable, and applicable to various contexts, settings, and demographics within the engineering enterprise. BPE is particularly interested in research that employs intersectional approaches in recognition that gender, race and ethnicity do not exist in isolation from each other and from other categories of social identity. BPE is equally interested in research activities that align with and provide meaningful connections to the NSF INCLUDES National Network. The overarching goal of NSF INCLUDES is to achieve significant impact at scale in transforming STEM education and workforce development by educating a diverse, STEM-capable workforce that includes talented individuals from all sectors of the Nation's population. Collaborations are encouraged between BPE proposals and existing NSF INCLUDES projects, for example, the NSF INCLUDES Alliances and Coordination Hub, provided these collaborations strengthen both the BPE and NSF INCLUDES projects. Before submitting a proposal to the BPE program, prospective Principal Investigators are strongly encouraged to speak to the program director to obtain guidance as to whether the proposed ideas are aligned with the strategic goals of the BPE program. Proposal Elements All BPE proposals should Be informed by the current theoretical and scientific literature as well as add to the extant knowledge base. Directly address how the work will broaden the participation of one or more underrepresented populations in engineering. Provide appropriate justification to support selection of the targeted group(s), with specific and applicable objectives, and demonstrate applicable knowledge of the relevant literature on underrepresentation. Integrate a mechanism to assess and evaluate how well the project has achieved the stated objectives as part of the project management plan. Provide evidence of clear, measurable outcomes and consideration of how the strategy will advance knowledge beyond localized contexts. Incorporate a dissemination plan that goes beyond publishing research papers and presenting at conferences. PIs should think creatively about who needs to hear about the research for it to have an impact, and develop a strategy to reach that audience. Describe how the outcomes have the potential to enhance diversity and inclusion of underrepresented populations in engineering. The Project Summary must contain a list of 3-5 keywords. Place the keywords on a separate line at the end of the Overview section of the Project Summary.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-569

The Sustained Availability of Biological Infrastructure program (SABI) supports the continued operation of extant infrastructure that will advance basic biological research. Infrastructure supported under this program may include cyberinfrastructure, instrumentation, experimental or observational facilities, biological living stocks which have ongoing costs of operation and maintenance that exceed the reasonable capacity of the host institution. Proposals must make a compelling case that sustained availability of the proposed infrastructure will advance or transform research in biological sciences as supported by the National Science Foundation. While other programs in the Division of Biological Infrastructure focus on research leading to future infrastructure or on the development or implementation of shared infrastructure, this program focuses on awards that ensure the continued availability of mature infrastructure resources critical to sustain the ability of today’s scientific community to conduct leading edge research. Awards made through this program are expected to lead to novel, impactful, and transformative science outcomes through research activities enabled by their use. Infrastructure that demonstrates substantial impact on research supported by the Directorate for Biological Sciences and its collaborating organizations is eligible for support under this program.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-568

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is the lead Federal agency managing the U.S. Antarctic Program (USAP), which supports scientific research and education in the Antarctic and the Southern Ocean. The Antarctic Artists and Writers Program was established to facilitate writing and artistic projects designed to increase the public’s understanding and appreciation of the Antarctic and human endeavors on the southernmost continent. The Artist and Writers Program gives priority to projects that focus on interpreting and representing the scientific activities being conducted in the unique Antarctic region.Proposed projects must target audiences in the U.S. and be distributed/exhibited in the U.S. The program does not support site installations or performances in Antarctica. The program also does not support short-term projects that are essentially journalistic in nature (See Section IX. Other Information). Artists and Writers Program field teams should consist of no more than one or two people. Larger projects—such as television or documentary film crews—should contact the cognizant AAW Program Officer. Successful projects will be provided with USAP logistical support needed to implement the proposed activity, as well as round-trip economy air tickets between the United States and the Southern Hemisphere. USAP infrastructure available to support projects undertaken by artists and writers consists of three year-round stations, numerous austral summer research camps in Antarctica, two research vessels, and surface and air transportation. The Artists and Writers Program does not provide direct funding to successful applicants for any purpose. Due to the unique nature of this program, proposers are strongly encouraged to carefully follow the guidelines described in this solicitation and to contact the cognizant Artists and Writers Program Officer prior to submitting a proposal to discuss the unique requirements and restrictions of the Antarctic Artists and Writers Program and Antarctic logistics in general. If Polar Programs determines, prior to the panel review, that the logistic needs for a project cannot be met in the upcoming field season, the proposal will be returned without review.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-567

The Science and Technology Centers (STC): Integrative Partnerships program supports exceptionally innovative, complex research and education projects that require large-scale, long-term awards. STCs focus on creating new scientific paradigms, establishing entirely new scientific disciplines and developing transformative technologies which have the potential for broad scientific or societal impact. STCs conduct world-class research through partnerships amonginstitutions of higher education, national laboratories, industrial organizations, other public or private entities, and via international collaborations, as appropriate. They provide a means to undertake potentially groundbreaking investigations at the interfaces of disciplines and/or highly innovative approaches within disciplines. STCs may involve any area of science and engineering that NSF supports. STC investments support the NSF vision of creating and exploiting new concepts in science and engineering and providing global leadership in research and education. Centers provide a rich environment for encouraging future scientists, engineers, and educators to take risks in pursuing discoveries and new knowledge. STCs foster excellence in education by integrating education and research, and by creating bonds between learning and inquiry so that discovery and creativity fully support the learning process. NSF expects STCs to demonstrate leadership in the involvement of groups traditionally underrepresented in science and engineering at all levels (faculty, students, and postdoctoral researchers) within the Center. Centers use either proven or innovative mechanisms to address issues such as recruitment, retention and mentorship of participants from underrepresented groups. Centers must undertake activities that facilitate knowledge transfer, i.e., the exchange of scientific and technical information with the objective of disseminating and utilizing knowledge broadly in multiple sectors. Examples of knowledge transfer include technology transfer, providing key information to public policy-makers, or dissemination of knowledge from one field of science to another.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-566

A grand challenge in computing is the creation of machines that can proactively interpret and learn from data in real time, solve unfamiliar problems using what they have learned, and operate with the energy efficiency of the human brain. While complex machine-learning algorithms and advanced electronic hardware (henceforth referred to as 'hardware') that can support large-scale learning have been realized in recent years and support applications such as speech recognition and computer vision, emerging computing challenges require real-time learning, prediction, and automated decision-making in diverse domains such as autonomous vehicles, military applications,healthcare informatics and business analytics. A salient feature of these emerging domains is the large and continuously streaming data sets that these applications generate, which must be processed efficiently enough to support real-time learning and decision making based on these data. This challenge requires novel hardware techniques and machine-learning architectures.This solicitation seeks to lay the foundation for next-generation co-design of RTML algorithms and hardware, with the principal focus on developing novel hardware architectures and learning algorithms in which all stages of training (including incremental training, hyperparameter estimation, and deployment) can be performed in real time. The National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) are teaming up through this Real-Time Machine Learning (RTML) program to explore high-performance, energy-efficient hardware and machine-learning architectures that can learn from a continuous stream of new data in real time, through opportunities for post-award collaboration between researchers supported by DARPA and NSF.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-565

ECR’s Building Capacity for STEM Education Research (ECR: BCSER) solicitation supports projects that build individuals’ capacity to carry out high quality STEM education research that will enhance the nation’s STEM education enterprise and broaden the pool of researchers that can conduct fundamental research in STEM learning and learning environments, broadening participation in STEM fields, and STEM workforce development. Specifically, ECR: BCSER supports activities that enable early and mid-career researchers to acquire the requisite expertise and skills to conduct rigorous fundamental research in STEM education. ECR: BCSER seeks to fund research career development activities on topics that are relevant to qualitative and quantitative research methods and design, including the collection and analysisof new qualitative or quantitative data, secondary analyses using extant datasets, or meta-analyses. This career development may be accomplished through investigator-initiated projects or through professional development institutes that enable researchers to integrate methodological strategies with theoretical and practical substantive issues in STEM education. Early and mid-career faculty new to STEM education research, particularly underrepresented minority faculty and faculty at minority-serving and two-year institutions, are encouraged to submit proposals. As a special emphasis under this solicitation, ECR: BCSER seeks proposals that will result in a single award for the development and implementation of an ECR Data Resource Hub. The hub will facilitate data sharing and analysis and provide technical assistance to advance data skills, tools, and resources across the STEM education research community.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-564

Communities in the United States (US) and around the world are entering a new era of transformation in which residents and their surrounding environments are increasingly connected through rapidly-changing intelligent technologies. This transformation offers great promise for improved wellbeing and prosperity but poses significant challenges at the complex intersection of technology and society. The goal of the NSF Smart and Connected Communities (S&CC) program solicitation is to accelerate the creation of the scientific and engineering foundations that will enable smart and connected communities to bring about new levels of economic opportunity and growth, safety and security, health and wellness, and overall quality of life. For the purposes of this solicitation, communities are defined as having geographically-delineated boundaries—such as towns, cities, counties, neighborhoods, community districts, rural areas, and tribal regions—consisting of various populations, with the structure and ability to engage in meaningful ways with proposed research activities. A “smart and connected community” is, in turn, defined as a community that synergistically integrates intelligent technologies with the natural and built environments, including infrastructure, to improve the social, economic, and environmental well-being of those who live, work, or travel within it. The S&CC program encourages researchers to work with communities and residents to identify and define challenges they are facing, enabling those challenges to motivate use-inspired research questions. The S&CC program supports integrative research that addresses fundamental technological and social science dimensions of smart and connected communities and pilots solutions together with communities. Importantly, the program is interested in projects that consider the sustainability of the research outcomes beyond the life of the project, including the scalability and transferability of the proposed solutions. This S&CC solicitation will support research projects in the following categories: S&CC Integrative Research Grants (SCC-IRGs) Tracks 1 and 2. Awards in this category will support fundamental integrative research that addresses technological and social science dimensions of smart and connected communities and pilots solutions together with communities. Track 1 is for budgets greater than $1,500,000 with no recommended budget limit, and for up to four years of support. Track 2 is for budgets not to exceed $1,500,000, and for up to three years of support. S&CC Planning Grants (SCC-PGs). Awards in this category are for capacity building to prepare project teams to propose future well-developed SCC-IRG proposals. Each of these awards will provide support for a period of one year and may be requested at a level not to exceed $150,000 for the total budget. S&CC is a cross-directorate program supported by NSF’s Directorates for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE), Education and Human Resources (EHR), Engineering (ENG), and Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (SBE).

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-563

Understanding how behavior emerges from the dynamic patterns of electrical and chemical activity of brain circuits is universally recognized as one of the great, unsolved mysteries of science. Advances in recent decades have elucidated how individual elements of the nervous system and brain relate to specific behaviors and cognitive processes. However, there remains much to discover to attain a comprehensive understanding of how the healthy brain functions, specifically, the general principles underlying how cognition and behavior relate to the brain’s structural organization and dynamic activities, how the brain interacts with its environment, and how brains maintain their functionality over time. Achieving an understanding of brain structure and function that spans levels of organization, spatial and temporal scales, and the diversity of species requires an international,transdisciplinary collaborative effort to not only integrate discipline-specific ideas andapproaches but also extend them to stimulate new discoveries, and innovativeconcepts, theories, and methodologies. The objective of this phase of the NeuroNex Program is the establishment of distributed, international research networks that build on existing globalinvestments in neurotechnologiesto address overarching questions in neuroscience. The creation of such global research networks of excellence will foster international cooperation by seeding close interactions between a wide array of organizations across the world, as well as creating links and articulating alliances between multiple recently launched international brain projects. The potential transformative advances in neuroscience stemming from this activity will have profound scientific and societal impacts. The goal of this solicitation is to support collaborative networks (approximately 15 to 20 investigators in each network) comprised of international teams of disciplinarily diverse experimentalists, theorists, and research resource (including technology and cyberinfrastructure) developersworking on a common foundational question in neuroscience. It is anticipated that these internationalnetworks will enable experimentation, analysis, and discovery in neuroscience at scales much larger than currently possible. This interdisciplinary, internationalprogram is one element of NSF’s broader effort directed at Understanding the Brain, a multi-year activity that includes NSF’s participation in the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative (http://www.nsf.gov/brain/) and the phased approach to develop a research infrastructure for neuroscience as outlined in the Dear Colleague Letter NSF16-047. The need for a program that helps neuroscientists collect, standardize, manage, and analyze the large amounts of data that result from research attempting to understand how the brain functions has been recognized by stakeholders in the scientific community and by the U.S. Congress in the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act (AICA) of 2017. The NSF and international partner agenciesenvision a connected portfolio of transformative, integrative projects that leverage existing globalinvestments in neurotechnologiesand create synergistic links across domestic and international investigators and communities, yielding novel ways of tackling the challenges of understanding the brain in action and in context.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-559

Quantum Leap Challenge Institutes are large-scale interdisciplinary research projects that aim to advance the frontiers of quantum information science and engineering. Research at these Institutes will span the focus areas of quantum computation, quantum communication, quantum simulation and/or quantum sensing. The institutes are expected to foster multidisciplinary approaches to specific scientific, technological, educational workforce development goals in these fields. Two types of awards will be supported under this program: (i) 12-month Conceptualization Grants (CGs) to support teams envisioning subsequent Institute proposals and (ii) 5-year Challenge Institute (CI) awards to establish and operate Quantum Leap Challenge Institutes. This activity is part of the Quantum Leap, one of the research Big Ideas promoted by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The NSF Quantum Leap Challenge Institutes program is consistent with the scope of NSF multidisciplinary centers for quantum research and education as described in the National Quantum Initiative Act[1]. In 2016, the NSF unveiled a set of “Big Ideas,” ten bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering (seehttps://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/big_ideas/index.jsp). The Big Ideas represent unique opportunities to position our nation at the cutting edge of global science and engineering leadership by bringing together diverse disciplinary perspectives to support convergence research. Although proposals responding to this solicitation must be submitted tothe Office of Multidisciplinary Activities (OMA) in the Directorate of Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS),they will subsequently be managed by a cross-disciplinary team of NSF Program Directors. [1] National Quantum Initiative Act, H.R. 6227, December 21, 2018.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-557

The National Science Foundation (NSF) and The Boeing Company are supporting a new initiative, managed and administered by NSF through its EHR Core Research (ECR) program, to accelerate training in critical skill areas for the Nation’s engineering and advanced manufacturing workforce. The EHR Core Research: Production Engineering Education and Research (ECR: PEER) initiative supports foundational research arising from the design, development, and deployment of creative online curricula that provide learners at various levels with skills in five focal areas: model-based systems engineering, software engineering, mechatronics, data science, and artificial intelligence. ECR: PEER invites proposals to design, develop, deploy, and study the effectiveness of online courses in any one of these focal areas using the theories and tools of the learning sciences. Proposals for these ECR: PEER Course, Curriculum, and Evaluation projects may request a maximum of $2,000,000 support for a duration of up to three years. Additionally, ECR: PEER welcomes proposals to convene experts in the academic, for-profit, and non-profit sectors to imagine the future of production engineering education for one of the five focal areas. Proposals for these ECR: PEER Workforce Development Workshops may request a maximum of $100,000 support for a duration of up to one year.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-556

In 1935, Franklin D. Roosevelt stated, “A nation that destroys its soils destroys itself." This statement remains true to this day. Soil forms over thousands of years and can be destroyed in a single event. It is a natural asset, alongside water and air, but is often overlooked, despite being the foundation of terrestrial ecosystems that support food production, economic prosperity, and services that are essential for humanity.Soils are complex living ecosystems containing billions of organisms that mediate a myriad of biological, chemical, and physical processes, interacting to cycle carbon and nutrients essential for plant growth, food and fiber production, and to remove contaminants from water. Soil is also the foundation material for all structures not supported on rock, and, by orders of magnitude, is the most widely-used construction material in the world. Soil ecosystems supply most of the antibiotics used to fight human diseases, control the movement of water and chemical substances between the Earth and atmosphere, and act as source and storage media for gases important to life, such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, and methane. Thus, as the Earth’s population grows, we need a better understanding of soil ecosystems that will continue to play a critical role in feeding the world. The National Science Foundation (NSF) Directorates for Engineering (ENG) andGeosciences (GEO), theDivision of Integrative Organismal Systems in the Directoratefor Biological Sciences(BIO/IOS), and the Division of Computer and Network Systems in the DirectorateComputer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE/CNS), in collaboration with the US Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA) and the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), and the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC)of United KingdomResearch and Innovation (UKRI) encourage convergent research that transforms existing capabilities in understanding dynamic, near-surface soilprocesses through advances in sensor systems and modeling. To accomplish this research, multiple disciplines must converge to produce novel sensors and/or sensing systemsof multiple modalities that are adaptable to different environments and collect data and report on a wide range of chemical, biological and physical parameters. This type of approach will also be necessary to develop next generation soil models, wireless communication and cyber systems capabilities, and to growa scientific community that is able to address complex problems through education and outreach. This program fosters collaboration among the partner agencies and the researchers they support by combining resources and funding for the most innovative and high-impact projects that address their respective missions.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-551

In 2016, the National Science Foundation (NSF) unveiled a set of "Big Ideas", 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering. The Big Ideas represent unique opportunities to position our Nation at the cutting edge of global science and engineering leadership by bringing together diverse disciplinary perspectives to support convergence research. As such, when responding to this solicitation, even though proposals must be submitted to the Office of Integrative Activities, once received, the proposals will be managed by a cross-disciplinary team of NSF Program Directors. Growing Convergence Research (GCR) at the National Science Foundation was identified as one of 10 Big Ideas. Convergence research is a means for solving vexing research problems, in particular, complex problems focusing on societal needs. It entails integrating knowledge, methods, and expertise from different disciplines and forming novel frameworks to catalyze scientific discovery and innovation. GCR identifies Convergence Research as having two primary characteristics: Research driven by a specific and compelling problem. Convergence Research is generally inspired by the need to address a specific challenge or opportunity, whether it arises from deep scientific questions or pressing societal needs. Deep integration across disciplines. As experts from different disciplines pursue common research challenges, their knowledge, theories, methods, data, research communities andlanguages become increasingly intermingled or integrated. New frameworks, paradigms or even disciplines can form sustained interactions across multiple communities. A distinct characteristic of convergence research, in contrast to other forms of multidisciplinary research, is that from the inception, the convergence paradigm intentionally brings together intellectually diverse researchers and stakeholders to frame the research questions, develop effective ways of communicating across disciplines and sectors, adopt common frameworks for their solution, and, when appropriate, develop a new scientific vocabulary. Research teams practicing convergence aim at developing sustainable relationships that may not only create solutions to the problem that engendered the collaboration, but also develop novel ways of framing related research questions and open new research vistas. This GCR solicitation targets multi-disciplinary team research that crosses directorate or division boundaries and is currently not supported by NSF programs, initiatives and research-focused Big Ideas. Proposers must make a convincing case that the research to be conducted is within NSF’s purview and cannot be supported by existing NSF programs and multidisciplinary initiatives. Proposals involving convergence in areas covered by existing programs and solicitations will be returned without review. The proposers should outline a five-year research plan delineated in two phases, Phase I: years 1-2, and Phase II: years 3-5. Successful proposals will be funded initially for two years and then each team’s progress will be evaluated based on a report and presentation that the team will make to a panel of reviewers at NSF. Teams that show significant progress during the first two years will receive funding for an additional three years. Interested researchers may request up to $1,200,000 total for the first two years and $2,400,000 for the last three years.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-550

In 2016, the National Science Foundation (NSF) unveiled a set of “Big Ideas,” 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering (seehttps://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/big_ideas/index.jsp). The Big Ideas represent unique opportunities to position our Nation at the cutting edge of global science and engineering leadership by bringing together diverse disciplinary perspectives to support convergence research. As such, when responding to this solicitation, even though proposals must be submitted to the Directorate for Computer & Information Science & Engineering/Division of Computing and Communication Foundations (CISE/CCF), once received, the proposals will be managed by a cross-disciplinary team of NSF Program Directors. NSF’sHarnessing the Data Revolution (HDR) Big Ideais a national-scale activity to enable new modes of data-driven discovery that will allow fundamental questions to be asked and answered at the frontiers of science and engineering. Through this NSF-wide activity, HDR will generate new knowledge and understanding, and accelerate discovery and innovation. The HDR vision is realized through an interrelated set of efforts in: Foundations of data science; Algorithms and systems for data science; Data-intensive science and engineering; Data cyberinfrastructure; and Education and workforce development. Each of these efforts is designed to amplify the intrinsically multidisciplinary nature of the emerging field of data science. The HDR Big Idea will establish theoretical, technical, and ethical frameworks that will be applied to tackle data-intensive problems in science and engineering, contributing to data-driven decision-making that impacts society. Harnessing the Data Revolution: Transdisciplinary Research In Principles Of Data Science (HDR TRIPODS) aims to bring together the electrical engineering,mathematics, statistics, and theoretical computer science communities to develop the theoretical foundations of data science through integrated research and training activities. Phase I, described in this solicitation, will support the development of small collaborative Institutes. Phase II (to be described in an anticipated future solicitation, subject to availability of funds) will support a smaller number of larger Institutes, selected from the Phase I Institutes via a second competitive proposal process. All HDR TRIPODS Institutes must involve significant and integral participation by researchers representing at least three of the four aforementioned communities. Please note that the ordering of the four communities is alphabetical and is not meant to emphasize any one discipline over another.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-548

The Cyberinfrastructure for Sustained Scientific Innovation (CSSI) umbrella program seeks to enable funding opportunities that are flexible and responsive to the evolving and emerging needs in cyberinfrastructure. This program continues the CSSI program by removing the distinction betweensoftwareanddataelements/framework implementations, and instead emphasizing integrated cyberinfrastructure services, quantitative metrics with targets for delivery and usage of these services, and community creation. The CSSI umbrella program anticipates four classes of awards: Elements:These awards target small groups that will create and deploy robust services for which there is a demonstrated need that will advance one or more significant areas of science and engineering. Framework Implementations: These awards target larger, interdisciplinary teams organized around the development and application of common services aimed at solving common research problems faced by NSF researchers in one or more areas of science and engineering, resulting in a sustainable community framework providing Cyberinfrastructure (CI) services to a diverse community or communities. Planning Grants for Community Cyberinfrastructure:Planning awards focus on the establishment of long-term cyberinfrastructure services, which would serve a research community of substantial size and disciplinary breadth. Community CyberinfrastructureImplementations: These Community Software Cyberinfrastructure Implementations focus on the establishment of long-term hubs of excellence in cyberinfrastructure services, which will serve a research community of substantial size and disciplinary breadth. This particular CSSI solicitation requests only Elements and Framework Implementations classes of awards. Prospective Principal Investigators (PIs) should be aware that this is a multi-directorate activity and that they are encouraged to submit proposals with broad, interdisciplinary interests. Further, not all divisions are participating at the same level and division-specific priorities differ. Thus, PIs interested in responding to this solicitation are encouraged to refer to core program descriptions, Dear Colleague Letters, and recently posted descriptions on directorate and divisional home pages to gain insight about the priorities for the relevant areas of science and engineering to which their proposals may be responsive. Prospective PIs should also refer to the directorate/division-specific descriptions contained in Section II of this solicitation.Finally, it is strongly recommended that prospective PIs contact program officer(s) from the list of Cognizant Program Officers in the division(s) that typically support the scientists and engineers who would make use of the proposed work, to gain insight into the priorities for the relevant areas of science and engineering to which their proposals should be responsive. As part of contacting Cognizant Program Officers, prospective PIs are also encouraged to ascertain that the focus and budget of their proposed work are appropriate for this solicitation.

Agency Documentation

In 2016, the National Science Foundation (NSF) unveiled a set of “Big Ideas,” 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering (see https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/big_ideas/index.jsp). The Big Ideas represent unique opportunities to position our Nation at the cutting edge of global science and engineering leadership by bringing together diverse disciplinary perspectives to support convergence research. As such, when responding to this solicitation, even though proposals must be submitted to CISE/OAC, once received, the proposals will be managed by a cross-disciplinary team of NSF Program Directors. NSF’s Harnessing the Data Revolution (HDR) Big Ideais a national-scale activity to enable new modes of data-driven discovery that will allow fundamental questions to be asked and answered at the frontiers of science and engineering. Through this NSF-wide activity, HDR will generate new knowledge and understanding, and accelerate discovery and innovation. The HDR vision is realized through an interrelated set of efforts in: Foundations of data science; Algorithms and systems for data science; Data-intensive science and engineering; Data cyberinfrastructure; and Education and workforce development. Each of these efforts is designed to amplify the intrinsically multidisciplinary nature of the emerging field of data science. The HDR Big Idea will establish theoretical, technical, and ethical frameworks that will be applied to tackle data-intensive problems in science and engineering, contributing to data-driven decision-making that impacts society. This solicitation is for Frameworks for Data-Intensive Research in Science and Engineering (DIRSE) as part of the HDR Institutes activity. These Frameworksrepresent one path ofa conceptualization phase aimed at developing Institutes as part ofthe NSF investment in the HDR Big Idea. The HDR Institutes activity seeks to create an integrated fabric of interrelated institutes that can accelerate discovery and innovation in multiple areas of data-intensive science and engineering. The HDR Institutes will achieve this by harnessing diverse data sources and developing and applying new methodologies, technologies, and infrastructure for data management and analysis. The HDR Institutes will support convergence between science and engineering research communities as well as expertise in data science foundations, systems, applications, and cyberinfrastructure. In addition, the HDR Institutes will enable breakthroughs in science and engineering through collaborative, co-designed programs to formulate innovative data-intensive approaches to address critical national challenges. HDR Institutes will be developed through a two-phase process involving conceptualization followed by convergence. The conceptualization phase will be implemented in FY 2019 via two complementary funding opportunities. The first opportunity in FY 2019 will encourage individuals with compelling data-intensive science and engineering problems and/or technical expertise to self-organize into teams with the aim of developing innovative, collaborative research proposals through an Ideas Lab process. The second opportunity in FY 2019, described in this solicitation, will encourage applications from teams of researchers proposing frameworks for integrated sets of science and engineeringproblems and data science solutions. The conceptualization phase will result in two-year awards aimed at building communities, defining research priorities, and developing interdisciplinary prototype solutions. NSF anticipates implementing the subsequent convergence and co-design phase in the 2021 timeframe with awards that integrate and scale successful prototypes and new ideas into larger, more comprehensive HDR Institutes that bring together multiple science and engineering communities with computer and computational scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and information scientists around common data science approaches. The overarching goal of the HDR Institutes DIRSE Frameworks solicitation is to foster convergent approaches to data-driven research in science and engineering. Frameworks will consist of interdisciplinary teams to conceptualize and pilot new modalities for collaboration and convergence that go beyond institutional walls and traditional disciplinary boundaries, to build innovative connections between scientific groups and data scientists and engineers, to integrate research infrastructure and education infrastructure. The Frameworks should focus on science and engineering areas that: (1) are at a “tipping point” where a timely investment in data-intensive approaches has the maximum potential for a transformative effect, (2) have needs that can benefit from interdisciplinary investments in data analytics infrastructure, and (3) represent investment priorities for the participating NSF directorates during, and beyond, the lifetime of the HDR Big Idea. Specific outcomes expected from the Frameworks include identification of frontier science and engineering challenge problems and the associated data and data-science barriers or tipping points, as well as development of new strategies and innovative approaches to foster scientific breakthroughs involving researchers from diverse scientific backgrounds.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-547

The National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) are interested in proposals that will propel our understanding of the biomedical research enterprise by drawing from the scientific expertise of the science of science policy research community. NSF promotes the progress of science by maintaining the general health of research and education across all fields of science and engineering. The Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (SBE) Directorate within the NSF supports basic research on people and society. The SBE sciences focus on human behavior and social organizations and how social, economic, political, cultural, and environmental forces affect the lives of people from birth to old age and how people in turn shape those forces. SBE's Science of Science and Innovation Policy (SciSIP) program supports research designed to advance the scientific basis of science and innovation policy. The NIH is the U.S. Federal agency charged with supporting biomedical research in the U.S.The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) within the NIH supports basic biomedical research that increases understanding of biological processes and lays the foundation for advances in disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Both the NSF and NIH believe that there are opportunities and needs in building and supporting research projects with a focus on the scientific research enterprise. The two agencies also recognize that when programmatic goals are compatible, coordinated management and funding of a research program can have a positive synergistic effect on the level and scope of research and can leverage the investments of both agencies. Therefore, NIGMS and SBE are partnering to enable collaboration in research between the SciSIP program and NIGMS. This partnership will result in a portfolio of high quality research to provide scientific analysis of important aspects of the biomedical research enterprise and efforts to foster a diverse, innovative, productive and efficient scientific workforce, from which future scientific leaders will emerge. Prospective investigators are strongly encouraged to discuss theirproposals with the cognizant Program Officers before submission to determine project relevance to the priorities of both SBE and NIGMS. Specific questions pertaining to this solicitation can also be directed to the cognizant Program Officers.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-546

Increasingly, undergraduate computer science (CS) programs are being called upon to prepare larger and more diverse student populations for careers in both CS and non-CS fields, including careers in scientific and non-scientific disciplines. Many of these students aim to acquire the understandings and competencies needed to learn how to use computation collaboratively across different contexts and challenging problems. However, standard CS course sequences do not always serve these students well. With this solicitation, NSF will support teams of Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) in re-envisioning the role of computing in interdisciplinary collaboration within their institutions. In addition, NSF will encourage partnering IHEs to use this opportunity to integrate the study of ethics into their curricula, both within core CS courses and across the relevant interdisciplinary application areas.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-543

In 2016, the National Science Foundation (NSF) unveiled a set of “Big Ideas,” 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering (see https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/big_ideas/index.jsp). The Big Ideas represent unique opportunities to position our Nation at the cutting edge of global science and engineering leadership by bringing together diverse disciplinary perspectives to support convergence research. As such, when responding to this solicitation, even though proposals must be submitted to the Directorate for Computer & Information Science & Engineering/Office of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure(CISE/OAC), once received, the proposals will be managed by a cross-disciplinary team of NSF Program Directors. NSF’s Harnessing the Data Revolution (HDR) Big Ideais a national-scale activity to enable new modes of data-driven discovery that will allow fundamental questions to be asked and answered at the frontiers of science and engineering. Through this NSF-wide activity, HDR will generate new knowledge and understanding, and accelerate discovery and innovation. The HDR vision is realized through an interrelated set of efforts in: Foundations of data science; Algorithms and systems for data science; Data-intensive science and engineering; Data cyberinfrastructure; and Education and workforce development. Each of these efforts is designed to amplify the intrinsically multidisciplinary nature of the emerging field of data science. The HDR Big Idea will establish theoretical, technical, and ethical frameworks that will be applied to tackle data-intensive problems in science and engineering, contributing to data-driven decision-making that impacts society. This solicitation describes one or more Ideas Lab(s) on Data-Intensive Research in Science and Engineering (DIRSE) as part of the HDR Institutes activity. These Ideas Labsrepresent one path ofa conceptualization phase aimed at developing Institutes as part ofthe NSF investment in the HDR Big Idea. The HDR Institutes activity seeks to create an integrated fabric of interrelated institutes that can accelerate discovery and innovation in multiple areas of data-intensive science and engineering. The HDR Institutes will achieve this by harnessing diverse data sources and developing and applying new methodologies, technologies, and infrastructure for data management and analysis. The HDR Institutes will support convergence between science and engineering research communities as well as expertise in data science foundations, systems, applications, and cyberinfrastructure. In addition, the HDR Institutes will enable breakthroughs in science and engineering through collaborative, co-designed programs to formulate innovative data-intensive approaches to address critical national challenges. HDR Institutes will be developed through a two-phase process involving conceptualization followed by convergence. The conceptualization phase will be implemented in FY 2019 via two complementary funding opportunities. The first opportunity in FY 2019, described in this solicitation, will encourage individuals with compelling data-intensive science and engineering problems and/or technical expertise to self-organize into teams with the aim of developing innovative, collaborative research proposals through an Ideas Lab process. The second opportunity in FY 2019 will encourage applications from teams of researchers proposing frameworks for integrated sets of science and engineeringproblems and data science solutions. The conceptualization phase will result in two-year awards aimed at building communities, defining research priorities, and developing interdisciplinary prototype solutions. NSF anticipates implementing the subsequent convergence and co-design phase in the 2021 timeframe with awards that integrate and scale successful prototypes and new ideas into larger, more comprehensive HDR Institutes that bring together multiple science and engineering communities with computer and computational scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and information scientists around common data science approaches. The overarching goal of the HDR Institutes DIRSE Ideas Labs is to foster convergent approaches to enable data-intensive research in science and engineering through a series of facilitated activities bringing together scientists and engineers working on important data-intensive science and engineering problems with data scientists, e.g., computer and computational scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and information scientists with expertise in different aspects of modeling and data analysis as well as systems and cyberinfrastructure specialists with expertise in opensource software development, reproducibility, and transfer learning. TheIdeas Labs will focus on areas that: (1) are at a “tipping point” where a timely investment in data-intensive approaches has the maximum potential for a transformative effect; (2) have needs that can benefit from interdisciplinary investments in data analytics infrastructure; and (3) represent investment priorities for NSF science and engineering directorates during, and beyond, the lifetime of the HDR Big Idea. US researchers may submit preliminary proposals for participating inthe Ideas Labs only via Fastlane. Based on the number of preliminary proposals and the science and engineering areas and data science expertise represented by the applicant pool, one or moreIdeas Labs may be scheduled in parallel. Participation in an Ideas Lab is required to be eligible to submit a full conceptualization proposal pursuant to this solicitation. Multidisciplinary ideas developed in an Ideas Lab will be submitted as full conceptualization proposals to NSF by invitation only. Interdisciplinary collaboration among researchers is required in the invited full conceptualization proposals.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-530

CubeSat constellations and swarms have been identified as a new paradigm for space-based measurements to address high-priority science questions in multiple disciplines. However, the full potential of CubeSat constellations and swarms for scientific studies has not yet been realized because of: i) the limitations of some of the existing key CubeSat technology, ii) knowledge gaps in the design and optimization of CubeSat technology for swarms and constellations, and iii) the increasing cost of more sophisticated CubeSat technology. The technology challenges include high bandwidth communications in CubeSat-to-CubeSat and CubeSat-to-ground scenarios, circuits and sensors miniaturization, on-board signal processing, and power generation. The vision of a satellite mission consisting of 10-100 CubeSats will require focused investment and development in a myriad of CubeSat-related technologies to build a cost-effective constellation or swarm of CubeSats. This will require transformative approaches for designing and building CubeSat subsystems and sensors, and innovative production approaches that will reduce the cost of implementing large-scale constellation missions.Spectrum allocations for data transmission and possible electromagnetic interference between or within constellations of CubeSats are issues that also will need to be considered. This solicitation describes an Ideas Lab focused onCubeSat Innovations to push the envelope of space-based research capabilities by simultaneously developing enabling technologies in several domains, including propulsion systems, sensor design, electronic circuits, antennas, satellite-to-ground and satellite-to-satellite communications and wireless networking, and power management. The vision of this Ideas Lab is to support research and engineering technology development efforts that will lead to new science missions in geospace and atmospheric sciences using self-organizing CubeSat constellations/swarms. The resulting new crosscutting concepts in CubeSat technology are expected to transform and stimulate CubeSat-enabled science and engineering research supported by NSF.The realization of self-organizing CubeSats will also require innovative approaches in educating, training, and developing a cross-disciplinary workforce with the relevant expertise spanning propulsion systems, sensors, circuits, antennas, wireless communications and networking,radio-frequency interference issues,and power management.It is anticipated that these innovations in CubeSat technology and education will enable new mission concepts for Cube-Sat based science investigations. Transformation in CubeSat technology will also enable science missions that can support the NSF’s 10 Big Ideas, such as Navigating the New Arctic by delivering multi-point Earth observations using CubeSat constellations; Windows on the Universe: The Era of Multi-Messenger Astrophysics by developing targeted CubeSat missions to support ground-based facilities, such as the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope or the Global Oscillation Network Group; Harnessing the Data Revolution by supporting the integration of CubeSats into the Internet of Things; NSF INCLUDES by broadening the participation among under-represented groups in STEM research and education; and NSF 2026: Seeding Innovation and Growing Convergent Research at NSF by supporting out-of-the-box innovations necessitated and cultivated by the cross-disciplinary nature of CubeSats. An Ideas Lab is an intensive meeting that brings together multiple diverse perspectives to focus on finding innovative cross-disciplinary solutions to a grand challenge problem. The ultimate aim of this Ideas Lab is to develop cutting edge CubeSat technologies that will enable a constellation/swarm of 10-100 satellites and transform space-based science investigations. The aspiration is that bringing together researchers from diverse scientific and engineering backgrounds will stimulate fresh thinking and innovative approaches that will provide a fertile ground for new and bold ideas on the design and fabrication of CubeSat sensors and circuits, antennas, inter-satellite and satellite-to-ground communications and networking, and innovative CubeSat missions. The goal is to form teams of scientists and engineers, who are experts in their respective domains, to come together and form interdisciplinary teams that will develop innovative and transformative ideas that will eventually be submitted as full proposals to address the challenges of building a CubeSat constellation/swarm of 10-100 CubeSats. This Ideas Lab is organized by the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS) in the Directorate for Geosciences (GEO), the Division of Computer and Network Systems (CNS) in the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE), and the Division of Electrical, Communications and Cyber Systems (ECCS) and the Division of Engineering Education and Centers (EEC) in the Directorate for Engineering (ENG).

Agency Documentation

Centers for Disease Control - NCIPC - CDC-RFA-CE19-1905

Violence is a major public health problem. Over 64,000 people died violently in the U.S. in 2016. These violent deaths included 44,965 suicides and 19,911 homicides. Violent deaths have been estimated to cost nearly $214 billion in medical care and lost productivity. Violence is preventable. Interventions, strategies, and policies are increasingly available that stop violence before it happens. Preventing violence is a critical public health goal because violence inflicts a substantial toll on individuals, families, and communities throughout the US. In order to prevent violence, we must first know the facts about violent deaths. This NOFO builds on previous and current work within the Division of Violence Prevention (DVP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to conduct surveillance of violence and to prevent violence. In 2002, CDC began implementing the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS, OMB No. 0920-0607). NVDRS is a state-based surveillance system that uses CDC guidelines and a CDC web-based data entry system to link data from Death Certificate (DC), Coroner/Medical Examiner (CME) reports including toxicology, and Law Enforcement (LE) reports to assist each participating state, territory, or district in designing and implementing tailored prevention and intervention efforts (See http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/nvdrs/index.html). As a state-based system, successful applicants collect and analyze data for their target area while CDC provides guidance to ensure the data are collected in a standardized manner and supplies access to a web-based data entry system. All successful applicants share their de-identified data with CDC. CDC combines successful applicant data into a multi-state database that informs national stakeholders. NVDRS summary data from 2003 to 2015 are available at: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/nvdrs.html.

National Science Foundation - 18-529

NSF INCLUDES (Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science) is a comprehensive national initiative designed to enhance U.S. leadership in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) discoveries and innovations by focusing on broadening participation in these fields at scale. The vision of NSF INCLUDES is to catalyze the STEM enterprise to collaboratively work for inclusive change, which will result in a STEM workforce that reflects the population of the Nation. The initiative is developing a National Network composed of NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilots, NSF INCLUDES Alliances, an NSF INCLUDES Coordination Hub, NSF-funded broadening participation projects, other relevant NSF-funded projects, scholars engaged in broadening participation research, and other organizations that support the development of talent from all sectors of society to build an inclusive STEM workforce. The successful implementation of NSF INCLUDES will result in substantial advances toward a diverse, innovative, and well-prepared STEM workforce to support our Nation’s economy and continued U.S. leadership in the global STEM enterprise. It is anticipated that NSF’s investment will contribute to new and improved STEM career pathways, policies, opportunities to learn, and practices for equity and inclusion. The initiative will be supported by the NSF INCLUDES Coordination Hub (NSF 17-591) that will provide a framework for communication and networking, network assistance and reinforcement, and visibility and expansion for the NSF INCLUDES National Network as a whole. This solicitation offers opportunities for NSF INCLUDES Alliances. The critical functions of each NSF INCLUDES Alliance are to: 1)Develop a vision and strategy (e.g., problem statement and theory of change) for broadening participation in STEM along with relevant metrics of success and key milestones/goals to be achieved during the project’s lifecycle; 2)Contribute to the knowledge base on broadening participation in STEM through broadening participation and implementation research, sharing project evaluations, data, new scientific findings/discoveries, and promising practices; 3)Develop multi-stakeholder partnerships and build infrastructure among them to decrease social distance and achieve progress on common goals targeted by the Alliance; 4)Establish a "backbone" or support organization that provides a framework for communication and networking, network assistance and reinforcement, visibility and expansion of the Alliance and its partners, that will collaborate with the NSF INCLUDES Coordination Hub; 5)Advance a logic model or other heuristic that identifies Alliance outcomes that reflect implementation of change at scale and progress toward developing an inclusive STEM enterprise. Collectively, the set of NSF INCLUDES Alliances are to: 1)Participate in a network of peer alliances to achieve long-term goals of the NSF INCLUDES program; 2)Collaborate with the NSF INCLUDES Coordination Hub to build critical knowledge that shows measurable progress toward long-term goals; and 3)Work to build on-ramps for other organizations and broadening participation stakeholders to join in and expand the NSF National Network. All NSF INCLUDES Alliance proposals should describe the results they expect to achieve in broadening participation in STEM. Each proposal must explain how they will build the infrastructure to foster collaboration and achieve impact by emphasizing the following five characteristics of the NSF INCLUDES Program: a) Vision, b) Partnerships, c) Goals and Metrics, d) Leadership and Communication, and e) the Potential for Expansion, Sustainability and Scale. Vision: Every NSF INCLUDES Alliance proposal should describe the vision of what the Alliance aspires to achieve. What will be different in the landscape of broadening participation in STEM as a result of the efforts of this Alliance? Partnerships: Partnerships and networks are at the heart of the NSF INCLUDES National Network, and Alliance proposals should include a plan for creating a platform for partnerships and collaborative action that includes a "backbone" or support organization. How will the Alliance partners engage an expansive community in a shared vision of the importance and power of broadening participation for scientific innovation? Why is the partnership that is being developed the right partnership to achieve the vision? Goals and Metrics: Alliance proposals should delineate how the partnerships and networks will develop and be driven by shared goals, available evidence from research that forms the basis for the plans, and the metrics and milestones that define the pathway to achieving the vision. Robust data collection plans and implementation research will need to be included, to facilitate evidence-based decision making and adjustments as the Alliance matures. Leadership and Communication: Alliance proposals should provide details for how the Alliance will build and strengthen capacity for leadership and communication among collaborating organizations and individuals to create opportunities and enact inclusion in STEM. Expansion, Sustainability and Scale: Finally, Alliance proposals should discuss how the collaborative infrastructure building process will ultimately lead to: expansion (more partners joining the movement), sustainability (more long-term connections being made), and implementation of change at scale (a likelihood for collaborative change to lead to change on a broad scale).

Agency Documentation

This file was generated on March 24, 2019 at 6:00 PM.