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Agriculture

Food and Drug Administration - PAR-19-306

The FDA recognizes the value of supporting high quality conferences and scientific meetings relevant to its mission and to the public health. A conference or scientific meeting is defined as a symposium, seminar, workshop, or any formal meeting, whether conducted face-to-face or virtually to exchange information and explore a defined subject, issue, or area of concern impacting the public's health within the scope of the FDA's mission. Support of such meetings is contingent upon the fiscal and programmatic interests and priorities of the FDA's respective Offices and Centers. Therefore, a conference grant application is required to contain an advance permission-to-submit letter from one of the participating FDA Centers listed under Components of Participating Organizations. Advanced Permission to Submit an Application: A Letter of Intent requesting advanced permission to submit a conference application is required and must be received via e-mail no later than eight (8) weeks prior to the selected application due date. To request advanced permission to submit an application letter from one of the participating FDA Centers/Offices, applicants must submit the following information on applicant organizational letterhead: FOA Number and Title; Selected application due date; FDA Center/Office that the application is seeking advanced permission to apply to; Meeting/conference title; Location and date of proposed meeting/conference; Names, Address, Telephone number and email address of Institution(s) participating in the application; Name, Address, Telephone number and email address of the Principal Investigator/Project Director; Names of other key personnel (if any) and points of contact; Number of anticipated attendees; Purpose, benefit, objectives and/or justification of the meeting/conference and how it aligns with the mission and program priorities of the targeted FDA Center/Office; Estimated budget that will be requested for the meeting/conference and purpose; and List other sources of funding (secured and planned), if applicable. All advanced permission to submit an application requests must be submitted via email to the Grants Management Contact listed in Section VII. Agency Contacts of this FOA. Applicants are urged to initiate contact well in advance of the chosen application due date and no later than 8 weeks before that date. Advanced permission to submit an application requests received after 8 weeks prior to the selected application due date will not be accepted. Please note that agreement to accept an application does not guarantee funding or funding at the level requested. Consistent with Federal civil rights laws, it is expected that organizers of FDA-supported conferences and scientific meetings take steps to maintain a safe and respectful environment for all attendees by providing an environment free from discrimination and harassment, sexual or otherwise.

Agency Documentation

National Institute of Food and Agriculture - USDA-NIFA-AFRI-006739

Applications to the FY 2019 Agriculture and Food Research Initiative - Sustainable Agricultural Systems (SAS) Request for Applications (RFA) must focus on approaches that promote transformational changes in the U.S. food and agriculture system within the next 25 years. NIFA seeks creative and visionary applications that take a systems approach, and that will significantly improve the supply of abundant, affordable, safe, nutritious, and accessible food, while providing sustainable opportunities for expansion of the bioeconomy through novel animal, crop, and forest products and supporting technologies. These approaches must demonstrate current and future social, behavioral, economic, health, and environmental impacts. Additionally, the outcomes of the work being proposed must result in societal benefits, including promotion of rural prosperity and enhancement of quality of life for those involved in food and agricultural value chains from production to utilization and consumption. See AFRI SAS RFA for details.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 18-590

The Plant Biotic Interactions (PBI) program supports research on the processes that mediate beneficial and antagonistic interactions between plants and their viral, bacterial, oomycete, fungal, plant, and invertebrate symbionts, pathogens and pests. This joint NSF/NIFA program supports projects focused on current and emerging model and non-model systems, and agriculturally relevant plants. The program’s scope extends from fundamental mechanisms to translational efforts, with the latter seeking to put into agricultural practice insights gained from basic research on the mechanisms that govern plant biotic interactions. Projects must be strongly justified in terms of fundamental biological processes and/or relevance to agriculture and may be purely fundamental or applied or include aspects of both perspectives. All types of symbiosis are appropriate, including commensalism, mutualism, parasitism, and host-pathogen interactions. Research may focus on the biology of the plant host, its pathogens, pests or symbionts, interactions among these, or on the function of plant-associated microbiomes. The program welcomes proposals on the dynamics of initiation, transmission, maintenance and outcome of these complex associations, includingstudies of metabolic interactions, immune recognition and signaling, host-symbiont regulation, reciprocal responses among interacting species and mechanisms associated with self/non-self recognition such as those in pollen-pistil interactions. Explanatory frameworks shouldinclude molecular, genomic, metabolic, cellular, network and organismal processes, with projects guided by hypothesis and/or discovery driven experimental approaches. Strictly ecological projects that do not address underlying mechanisms are not appropriate for this program. Quantitative modeling in concert with experimental work is encouraged. Overall, the program seeks to support research that will deepen our understanding of the fundamental processes that mediate interactions between plants and the organisms with which they intimately associate and advance the application of that knowledge to benefit agriculture.

Agency Documentation

National Institute of Food and Agriculture - USDA-NIFA-AFRI-006609

The AFRI Foundational and Applied Science Program supports grants in the six AFRI priority areas to advance knowledge in both fundamental and applied sciences important to agriculture. The six priority areas are: Plant Health and Production and Plant Products; Animal Health and Production and Animal Products; Food Safety, Nutrition, and Health; Bioenergy, Natural Resources, and Environment; Agriculture Systems and Technology; and Agriculture Economics and Rural Communities. Research-only, extension-only, and integrated research, education and/or extension projects are solicited in this Request for Applications (RFA). See Foundational and Applied Science RFA for specific details.

Agency Documentation

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Arts & Humanities

Institute of Museum and Library Services - ME-FY20

The goal of the Museums for America (MFA) grant program is to support projects that strengthen the ability of an individual museum to serve its public. Museums Empowered: Professional Development Opportunities for Museum Staff is a special MFA initiative with the goal of strengthening the ability of an individual museum to serve its public through professional development activities that cross-cut various departments to generate systemic change within the museum. As centers of innovation and discovery, as well as catalysts of community revitalization, museums are at the forefront of change in our communities. Like any other institution, museums need to remain dynamic to respond to fast-evolving technological advances and changing demographics. Museums also need to generate and share outcomes-based data and demonstrate results of their community impact efforts. In addition, they need to develop sustainable organizational structures and strategies for continued growth and vitality. Professional development is critical for museums to deliver on these areas of need. IMLS encourages applicants to invest in the professional development of museum staff, leadership, and volunteers to enhance their skills and ensure the highest standards in all aspects of museum operations. This includes, but is not limited to, creating opportunities to encourage a more inclusive and diverse museum professional and volunteer workforce, and building the skills of museum staff at all levels with emphasis on the development of the next generation of museum professionals. To support and empower museums of all sizes and disciplines in responding to the evolving needs of the museum profession and changes in their communities, this MFA special initiative has four project categories for professional development: • Digital Technology: for museum staff to fully explore, understand, adopt, and optimize the use of digital technology in museums • Diversity and Inclusion: for museum staff to develop cultural competency and support museum relevancy in their communities • Evaluation: to expand museum staff’s capacity in conducting formative and summative evaluation of programs, practices, and products that can help the museum yield indicators and measurable outcomes • Organizational Management: for museum staff to learn best practices in organizational management, strategic thinking, innovation, and managing change Potential projects will address one of these four project categories and help strengthen the ability of an individual museum to better serve its public. Projects will utilize comprehensive strategies and frameworks to support professional development. Projects should cross-cut various departments and result in systemic change within the museum.

Agency Documentation

National Endowment for the Arts - 2020NEA01ORA

Grant applications previously submitted to the Research: Art Works category will now be submitted to the Research Grants in the Arts category. The Arts Endowment’s support of a project may start on May 1, 2020, or any time thereafter. Grants generally may cover a period of performance of up to two years, with an exception for projects that include primary data collection as part of the proposed activity. Projects that include primary data collection may request up to three years. Grant Program Description These grants support research that investigates the value and/or impact of the arts, either as individual components of the U.S. arts ecology or as they interact with each other and/or with other domains of American life. Research Grants in the Arts offers support for projects in two areas: • Track One: Value and Impact. These are matching grants ranging from $10,000-$30,000 for research projects that aim to examine the value and/or impact of the arts in any topic area(s) by using data and methods appropriate to the proposed research questions. • Track Two: Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Designs. These are matching grants ranging from $30,000-$100,000 for research projects that aim to test the causal or inferred-causal impact of the arts on individual or cohort outcomes by using experimental or quasi-experimental design methods appropriate to the proposed research questions.

Agency Documentation

National Endowment for the Humanities - 20191015-AV

The National Endowment for the Humanities Division of Education Programs is accepting application for the Dialogues on the Experience of War program. NEH offers the Dialogues on the Experience of War (Dialogues) program as part of its current initiative, Standing Together: The Humanities and the Experience of War. The program supports the study and discussion of important humanities sources about war, in the belief that these sources can help U.S. military veterans and others think more deeply about the issues raised by war and military service. Dialogues is primarily designed to reach military veterans; however, men and women in active service, military families, and interested members of the public may also participate.

Agency Documentation

Manchester Literature Festival

£10,000 prize for the best portfolio of three to five poems (maximum combined length: 120 lines). Open internationally to new and established writers aged 16 or over (no upper age limit).

*A limited number of reduced price entries are available to writers who might not otherwise be able to take part in the competition. If you would like to apply for one of these, please contact writingschool@mmu.ac.uk to register your interest and for further details. The deadline for expressions of interest in reduced price entry is 30th June 2019.

Agency Documentation

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Biomedical & Biological Sciences

The purpose of the MOSAIC Postdoctoral Career Transition Award to Promote Diversity (K99/R00) program is to support a cohort of early career, independent investigators from diverse backgrounds conducting research in NIH mission areas. The long-term goal of this program is to enhance diversity in the basic biomedical sciences research workforce. The MOSAIC K99/R00 program is designed to facilitate a timely transition of outstanding postdoctoral researchers from diverse backgrounds (e.g., see NIHs Interest in Diversity) from their mentored, postdoctoral research positions to independent, tenure-track or equivalent faculty positions at research-intensive institutions. The MOSAIC K99/R00 program will provide independent NIH research support during this transition to help awardees launch competitive, independent research careers. Additionally, MOSAIC K99/R00 scholars will be part of organized scientific cohorts that will be expected to participate in mentoring, networking, and professional development activities coordinated by MOSAIC Institutionally-Focused Research Education Award to Promote Diversity (UE5) grantees.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-592

The multi-agency Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases program supports research on the ecological, evolutionary, and social drivers that influence the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases. The central theme of submitted projects must be the quantitative or computational understanding of pathogen transmission dynamics. The intent is discovery of principles of infectious disease transmission and testing mathematical or computational models that elucidate infectious disease systems. Projects should be broad, interdisciplinary efforts that go beyond the scope of typical studies. They should focus on the determinants and interactions of transmission among humans, non-human animals, and/or plants. This includes, for example, the spread of pathogens; the influence of environmental factors such as climate; the population dynamics and genetics of reservoir species or hosts; the feedback between ecological transmission and evolutionary dynamics; and the cultural, social, behavioral, and economic dimensions of pathogen transmission. Research may be on zoonotic, environmentally-borne, vector-borne, or enteric pathogens of either terrestrial or aquatic systems and organisms, including diseases of animals and plants, at any scale from specific pathogens to inclusive environmental systems. Proposals for research on disease systems of public health concern to developing countries are strongly encouraged, as are disease systems of concern in agricultural systems. Investigators are encouraged to develop the appropriate multidisciplinary team, including for example, anthropologists, modelers, ecologists, bioinformaticians, genomics researchers, social scientists, economists, oceanographers, mathematical scientists, epidemiologists, evolutionary biologists, entomologists, parasitologists, microbiologists, bacteriologists, virologists, pathologists or veterinarians, with the goal of integrating knowledge across disciplines to enhance our ability to predict and control infectious diseases.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-313

The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) invites applications for Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) from investigators at Universities that award doctoral degrees in the health-related sciences or independent biomedical research institutes/medical centers with ongoing biomedical research programs funded by NIH or other federal agencies within Institutional Development Award (IDeA)-eligible states. The objectives of the COBRE initiative are to strengthen an institution's biomedical research infrastructure through the establishment of a thematic multi-disciplinary center and to enhance the ability of investigators to compete independently for NIH individual research grants or other external peer-reviewed support. COBRE awards are supported through the IDeA Program, which aims to foster health-related research by increasing the competitiveness of investigators at institutions located in states with historically low aggregate success rates for grant awards from the NIH.

Agency Documentation

The purpose of this FOA is to attract data and computational scientists to propose novel ways to integrate data of different types and scales to allow new types of analysis. It is expected that with the development and application of novel computational, bioinformatics, statistical, and analytical approaches, previously inaccessible insights will reveal new aspects of addiction biology.

Agency Documentation

The purpose of this FOA is to attract data and computational scientists to propose novel ways to integrate data of different types and scales to allow new types of analysis. It is expected that with the development and application of novel computational, bioinformatics, statistical, and analytical approaches, previously inaccessible insights will reveal new aspects of addiction biology.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-300

The goal of the Bridges to the Doctorate Research Training program is to develop a diverse pool of scientists earning a Ph.D., who have the skills to successfully transition into careers in the biomedical research workforce. This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) provides support to eligible, domestic institutions to develop and implement effective, evidence-based approaches to biomedical training and mentoring that will keep pace with the rapid evolution of the research enterprise. NIGMS expects that the proposed research training programs will incorporate didactic, research, mentoring, and career development elements to prepare trainees for careers that will have a significant impact on the health-related research needs of the Nation. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) does not allow appointed Trainees to lead an independent clinical trial but does allow them to obtain research experience in a clinical trial led by a mentor or co-mentor.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-299

The goal of the Bridges to the Baccalaureate Research Training Program is to provide structured activities to prepare community college students to transfer to and complete a bachelor's degree in biomedical research fields. This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) provides support to eligible, domestic institutions to develop and implement effective, evidence-based approaches to biomedical training and mentoring that will keep pace with the rapid evolution of the research enterprise. NIGMS expects that the proposed research training programs will incorporate didactic, research, mentoring, and career development elements to prepare trainees to bridge from the community college and complete the bachelor's degree in biomedical fields. This program requires partnerships between two-year post-secondary educational institutions granting the associate degree with four-year colleges or universities that offer the baccalaureate degree. This FOA does not allow appointed trainees to lead an independent clinical trial but does allow them to obtain research experience in a clinical trial led by a mentor or co-mentor.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-296

The NIAID New Innovator Awards supports post-doctoral and early stage investigators of exceptional creativity who propose highly innovative bold new research with the potential to produce a major impact on broad, important problems in biomedical research of priority to NIAID. Applications from individuals with diverse backgrounds and in any topic relevant to the mission of NIAID are welcome.

Agency Documentation

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages solicits applications that propose research designed to test training, mentoring, and networking interventions intended to enhance research-oriented individuals' interest, motivation, persistence and preparedness for careers in the biomedical research workforce. Funded projects are expected to produce research findings that will guide the design and implementation of potential interventions in a variety of academic settings and career levels to enhance the diversity of the biomedical research workforce.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-274

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages investigators to submit research grant applications that will identify, develop, test, evaluate and/or refine strategies to disseminate and implement evidence-based practices (e.g. behavioral interventions; prevention, early detection, diagnostic, treatment and disease management interventions; quality improvement programs) into public health, clinical practice, and community settings. In addition, studies to advance dissemination and implementation research methods and measures are encouraged.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-275

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages investigators to submit research grant applications that will identify, develop, test, evaluate and/or refine strategies to disseminate and implement evidence-based practices (e.g. behavioral interventions; prevention, early detection, diagnostic, treatment and disease management interventions; quality improvement programs) into public health, clinical practice, and community settings. In addition, studies to advance dissemination and implementation research methods and measures are encouraged.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-258

The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research education activities in the mission areas of the NIH. The over-arching goal of this NIDA R25 program is to support educational activities that complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nations biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs. This FOA is intended to support research education activities that enhance the knowledge of substance use and substance use disorder research. The program is intended for those in clinically focused careers and/or those training for careers as clinicians/health service providers, clinical researchers, or optimally a combination of the two. This mechanism may not be used to support non-research-related clinical training.

Agency Documentation

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation ‘Pioneering Ideas’ funding opportunity is to explore; to look into the future and put health first as we design for changes in how we live, learn, work and play; to wade into uncharted territory in order to better understand what new trends, opportunities and breakthrough ideas can enable everyone in America to live the healthiest life possible.
While improving the status quo is vital to the health and well-being of millions of Americans now, the Pioneering Ideas Brief Proposal opportunity reaches beyond incremental changes to explore the ideas and trends that will influence the trajectory and future of health. Ultimately, we support work that will help us learn what a Culture of Health can look like—and how we can get there.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - RFA-RM-19-007

The NIH Directors Transformative Research Award Program supports individual scientists or groups of scientists proposing groundbreaking, exceptionally innovative, original, and/or unconventional research with the potential to create new scientific paradigms, establish entirely new and improved clinical approaches, or develop transformative technologies. For the program to support the best possible researchers and research, applications are sought which reflect the full diversity of the research workforce. Individuals from diverse backgrounds and from the full spectrum of eligible institutions in all geographic locations are strongly encouraged to apply to this Funding Opportunity Announcement. In addition, applications in all topics relevant to the broad mission of NIH are welcome, including, but not limited to, topics in the behavioral, social, biomedical, applied, and formal sciences and topics that may involve basic, translational, or clinical research. No preliminary data are required. Projects must clearly demonstrate, based on the strength of the logic, a compelling potential to produce a major impact in a broad area of relevance to the NIH. The NIH Directors Transformative Research Award is a component of the High-Risk, High-Reward Research program of the NIH Common Fund.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-570

Anthropological research may be conducted under unusual circumstances, often in distant locations. As a result the ability to conduct potentially important research may hinge on factors that are impossible to assess from a distance and some projects with potentially great payoffs may face difficulties in securing funding. This program gives small awards that provide investigators with the opportunity to assess the feasibility of an anthropological research project. It is required that the proposed activity be clearly high risk in nature. The information gathered may then be used as the basis for preparing a more fully developed research program. Investigators must contact the cognizant NSF Program Director before submitting an HRRBAA proposal. This will facilitate determining whether the proposed work is appropriate for HRRBAA support.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-569

The Sustained Availability of Biological Infrastructure program (SABI) supports the continued operation of extant infrastructure that will advance basic biological research. Infrastructure supported under this program may include cyberinfrastructure, instrumentation, experimental or observational facilities, biological living stocks which have ongoing costs of operation and maintenance that exceed the reasonable capacity of the host institution. Proposals must make a compelling case that sustained availability of the proposed infrastructure will advance or transform research in biological sciences as supported by the National Science Foundation. While other programs in the Division of Biological Infrastructure focus on research leading to future infrastructure or on the development or implementation of shared infrastructure, this program focuses on awards that ensure the continued availability of mature infrastructure resources critical to sustain the ability of today’s scientific community to conduct leading edge research. Awards made through this program are expected to lead to novel, impactful, and transformative science outcomes through research activities enabled by their use. Infrastructure that demonstrates substantial impact on research supported by the Directorate for Biological Sciences and its collaborating organizations is eligible for support under this program.

Agency Documentation

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - ERA - RFA-TS-19-002

The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is committed to protecting people's health from environmental hazards by investigating the relationship between environmental factors and health, developing guidance, and building partnerships to support healthy decision making. The intent of the ATSDR extramural research program is to fund research that promotes healthy community environments by assessing the available scientific data to determine whether people may be at risk due to the effects of their exposures to harmful chemicals in the environment. ATSDR will be soliciting investigator-initiated research intended to commence a multi-site study on the human health effects of exposures to drinking water contaminated with per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). Study sites may include communities using PFAS-contaminated private residential wells or public water systems. Exposure assessment will be based on measured PFAS serum levels as well as estimated PFAS serum levels based on historical reconstruction of PFAS levels in the drinking water and pharmacokinetic modeling. Effect biomarkers expected to be evaluated during the course of this research may include lipids and tests of immune and thyroid function.

National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-093

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) seeks to support research that examines how health information technology adoption impacts minority health and health disparity populations in access to care, quality of care, patient engagement, and health outcomes.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-071

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to invite applications proposing new tests, animal models, techniques, etc. to advance research on Alzheimer's disease and its related dementias and which need additional preliminary data with broader dissemination to establish them for more general use in this research field. The priority topics will be announced through a series of Notices published subsequent to this FOA.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-037

The goal of the Initiative for Maximizing Student Development (IMSD) program is to develop a diverse pool of scientists earning a Ph.D., who have the skills to successfully transition into careers in the biomedical research workforce. The long-term goal of the program is to enhance the diversity of biomedical research scientists in the Nations workforce. This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) provides support to eligible, domestic institutions to develop and implement effective, evidence-based approaches to biomedical training and mentoring that will keep pace with the rapid evolution of the research enterprise. NIGMS expects that the proposed research training programs will incorporate didactic, research, and career development elements to prepare trainees for careers that will have a significant impact on the health-related research needs of the Nation. This program is limited to applications from training programs at research-intensive institutions (i.e., those with a 3-year average of NIH Research Project Grant funding equal to or above $7.5 million total costs).

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - RFA-MH-19-400

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA), in support of the NIH Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative, is one of several FOAs aimed at supporting transformative discoveries that will lead to breakthroughs in understanding human brain function. Guided by the long-term scientific plan, BRAIN 2025: A Scientific Vision, this FOA specifically seeks to support efforts addressing core ethical issues associated with research focused on the human brain and resulting from emerging technologies and advancements supported by the BRAIN Initiative. The hope is that efforts supported under this FOA might be both complementary and integrative with the transformative, breakthrough neuroscience discoveries supported through the BRAIN Initiative.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - PD-18-1165

Biological processes at all scales from molecules to ecosystems are determined through the encoding, exchange, and interpretation of information. Advances in the biological sciences are enabled by our capacity to acquire, manage, represent, and analyze biological information through the use of modern instrumentation and computational tools. Developing an integrated understanding of cell function, regulatory systems, or ecological responses to environmental change are just a few examples of biological research areas that involve the acquisition, observation, experiment, and modeling of large amounts of data. Proposals are invited that offer potentially transformative outcomes through the development of informatics tools and resources that (1) offer novel and significant advances in the use of biological data and/or (2) will enable and stimulate advances through their impact on a significant segment of the biological research community supported by the NSF BIO Directorate. Awards in CIBR should produce, or substantially expand a finished product that will have demonstrable impact in advancing biological research. Proposals should convey their likelihood of success through greaterattention touser engagement, design quality, engineering practices, management plan,and dissemination.Budgets and award durationsshould accommodate the iterative process of bringing a proof of concept into a robust, broadly-adopted cyberinfrastructure. Development proposals are more outcome-driven than Innovation awards and are typically assessed on their perceived contribution to a broad portfolio of cyberinfrastructure resources. Synergies with, and leveraging of, other existing and ongoing resources are taken into consideration. CIBR supports development in areas that may include (but are not limited to): Databases consisting of primary data obtained through observation, experimentation, modelling, or synthesis of existing data into new derivative products. New tools for the construction, operation, and utilization of biological databases, including database architectures and infrastructures, data standards designed to be extendable to different biological domains, and data structures for new types of biological information Software or ontologies related to the retrieval, integration, and use of heterogeneous biological information, for example, data discovery, data-mining, data integration or visualization Tools that facilitate biological research workflows, analytic pathways, or integration between the field and the laboratory, or between observation, experiments and models Software and methods for making use of new technologies for the acquisition, communication or visualization of biological data Infrastructure that provides broad community access to shared computational and data resources, commonly referred to as scientific gateways. Higher priority will be placed on proposals to create computational tools and data resources that are applicable to a broad range of biological research questions and shared by a broad user community. Proposals to develop tools ordatabases that are limited to a specific research project, laboratory, or institution should be submitted to the relevant BIO programs that would normally support that research.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 18-594

The Infrastructure Capacity for Biology (ICB) supports the development, expansion, or improvement of infrastructure that will enable fundamental research within the biological sciences. Infrastructure supported under thissolicitation may include cyberinfrastructure, instrumentation, biological collections, living stocks, field stations, marine labs, or other resources that are shared and openly accessible. Proposals submitted to the ICB solicitation must make a compelling case that the proposed infrastructure will advance or transform research in areas of science that are supported by the Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO) at the National Science Foundation. While other programs in the Division of Biological Infrastructure (DBI) focus on innovative research leading to new infrastructure or sustained operation of mature infrastructure, thissolicitation focuses on supporting projects that seek to deliver, enable access to, or substantially improve infrastructure that will advance the capacity oftoday’s scientific community to conduct leading edge research. The impacts of the activities funded by awards made through this solicitation will be reflected not just in the quality of their products, but by the novel and transformative science outcomes that will be achieved by the users of these resources. Infrastructure projects that will advance any field of research supported by the Directorate for Biological Sciences are eligible for support under this program. Please refer to the individual program descriptions for detailed guidance on what is supported through this solicitation: Cyberinfrastructure for Biological Research (CIBR); Collections in Support of Biological Research(CSBR); Improvements in Facilities, Communications, and Equipment at Biological Field Stations and Marine Laboratories(FSML); and Instrumentation Capacity for Biological Research (ICBR).

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-18-864

The National Eye Institute (NEI) supports investigator-initiated, complex, multi-center and other high resource risk epidemiologic studies under the cooperative agreement mechanism, UG1 activity code. Specifically, the purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to support new and innovative ocular epidemiology research.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-17-340

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is designed to support highly integrated research teams of three to six PD/PIs to address ambitious and challenging research questions that are important for the mission of NIGMS and are beyond the scope of an individual or a few investigators. Collaborative program teams are expected to accomplish goals that require considerable synergy and managed team interactions. Project goals should not be achievable with a collection of individual efforts or projects. Teams are encouraged to consider far-reaching objectives that will produce major advances in their fields. Applications that are mainly focused on the creation, expansion, and/or maintenance of community resources, creation of new technologies or infrastructure development are not appropriate for this FOA.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 15-576

This program seeks to enhance and expand the national resource of digital data documenting existing vouchered biological and paleontological collections and to advance scientific knowledge by improving access to digitized information (including images) residing in vouchered scientific collections across the United States. The information associated with various collections of organisms, such as geographic, paleogeographic and stratigraphic distribution, environmental habitat data, phenology, information about associated organisms, collector field notes, and tissues and molecular data extracted from the specimens, is a rich resource providing the baseline from which to further biodiversity research and provide critical information about existing gaps in our knowledge of life on earth. The national resource is structured at three levels: a central coordinating organization, a series of thematic networks based on an important research theme, and the physical collections. The national resource builds upon a sizable existing national investment in curation of the physical objects in scientific collections and contributes vitally to scientific research and technology interests in the United States. It will become an invaluable tool in understanding contemporary biological issues and challenges.

Agency Documentation

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Business & Technology

Air Force Office of Scientific Research - FA9550-19-S-0004

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) seeks unclassified proposals for broad-based research and development aimed at using lasers and other light source technology to develop applications in medicine, photobiology, surgery, and closely related materials sciences, with applications to combat casualty care and other military medical problems. This announcement is primarily directed toward university-based medical institutions; however, all qualified and responsible prime applicants located in the United States are eligible to submit proposals. The highest priority will be extended to proposals up to three (3) years duration to be conducted by teams of physicians, biomedical scientists, physical scientists, and engineers. The efforts proposed may be basic or applied research, and must have direct relevance to combat casualty care or other military medical priorities. Applicants must demonstrate substantial experience working to further military medical priorities, including transitioning research into clinical practice and working products. Substantial experience collaborating with military medical centers is also a requirement to establish relevance to combat casualty care or other military medical priorities, and facilitate the transition of research results to meet military needs. Applicants are encouraged to apply as early as practicable. Proposals may be reviewed and selected as received. Awards may take the form of grants or contracts

Agency Documentation

Air Force Office of Scientific Research - FA9550-19-S-0002

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) seeks unclassified proposals for research and development aimed at using lasers and other light source technology to develop applications in medicine, photobiology, surgery, and closely related materials sciences, with applications to combat casualty care and other military medical problems. This announcement is for a small number of individual awards. It is complementary to ongoing and future planed broad based awards, primarily directed toward university-based medical institutions, conducted by teams of physicians, biomedical scientists, physical scientists, and engineers. The efforts proposed may be basic or applied research, and must have direct relevance to combat casualty care or other military medical priorities. They must offer unique capabilities, not substantially funded by other DOD or other agency programs. Applicants must demonstrate substantial experience working to further military medical priorities, including transitioning research into clinical practice and working products. Substantial experience collaborating with military medical centers is also a requirement to establish relevance to combat casualty care or other military medical priorities, and facilitate the transition of research results to meet military needs.

Air Force -- Research Lab - FA8650-18-S-6001

This effort is an open 2 Step BAA soliciting innovative research concepts for the overall mission of the Human-Centered Intelligence, Surveillance, & Reconnaissance (ISR) Division (711 HPW/RHX).The overall RHX research objective is to develop human-centered S&T that enables the Air Force to more effectively execute the ISR mission. This research objective is dual natured: (1) improve the capability to identify, track and locate human targets in the ISR environment and (2) improve the performance of humans who process, exploit, analyze, produce, and disseminate the ISR data and information. Human-centered ISR research encompasses three major research areas: (1) human signatures, (2) human trust and interaction and (3) human analyst augmentation. The human signatures research develops technologies to sense and exploit human bio-signatures at both the molecular level and macro (anthropometric) level. The human trust and interaction research develops technologies to improve human-to-human interactions as well as human-to- machine interactions. The human analyst augmentation research develops technologies to enhance analyst performance and to test the efficacy of newly developed technologies within a simulated operational environment.

Agency Documentation

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Computer & Information Sciences

National Institutes of Health - RFA-OD-19-022

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to invite R21 applications proposing the innovative analysis of existing (publicly available) nationally representative U.S. cross-sectional and longitudinal data, to investigate novel scientific ideas and/or to generate new models, systems, tools, methods, or technologies that have the potential for significant impact on biomedical or biobehavioral research in areas relevant to the FDA CTP. Other publicly available data sets would be considered depending on the analyses to be conducted; however, nationally representative analyses will receive priority. Applications not using nationally representative data sets will need to provide justification why the data set is unique, and the research questions cant be answered from a (publicly available) national representative data set. This FOA encourages the analyses of public use datasets that may inform tobacco regulatory actions in the U.S. The awards under this FOA will be administered by NIH using funds that have been made available through FDA CTP and the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (P.L. 111-31). Research results from this FOA are expected to generate findings and data that are directly relevant in informing the FDA's regulation of the manufacture, distribution, and marketing of tobacco products to protect public health. Research Projects must address the research priorities related to the regulatory authority of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Tobacco Products (CTP).

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-589

The NSF CISE Directorate supports research and education projects that develop new knowledge in all aspects of computing, communications, and information science and engineering, as well as advanced cyberinfrastructure, through the following core programs: Office of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure (OAC): OAC Core Research (OAC Core) program; Division of Computing and Communication Foundations (CCF): Algorithmic Foundations (AF) program; Communications and Information Foundations (CIF) program; Foundations of Emerging Technologies (FET) program; and Software and Hardware Foundations (SHF) program; Division of Computer and Network Systems (CNS): CNS Core (CNS Core) program; Division of Information and Intelligent Systems (IIS): Cyber-Human Systems (CHS) program; Information Integration and Informatics (III) program; and Robust Intelligence (RI) program. Proposers are invited to submit proposals in several project classes, which are defined as follows: Small Projects -- up to $500,000 total budget with durations up to three years: projects in this class may be submitted to OAC, CCF, CNS, and IIS; Medium Projects -- $500,001 to $1,200,000 total budget with durations up to four years: projects in this class may be submitted to CCF, CNS, and IIS only; and Large Projects -- $1,200,001 to $3,000,000 total budget with durations up to five years: projects in this class may be submitted to CNS only. A more complete description of these project classes can be found in Section II. Program Description of this document.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-587

The intent of this solicitation is to request proposals from organizations willing to serve as service providers (SPs) within the NSF Innovative High-Performance Computing (HPC) program to provide advanced cyberinfrastructure (CI) capabilities and/or services in production operations to support the full range of computational- and data-intensive research across all of science and engineering (S&E). The current solicitation is intended to complement previous NSF investments in advanced computational infrastructure by provisioning resources, broadly defined in this solicitation to include systems and/or services, in two categories: Category I, Capacity Systems: production computational resources maximizing the capacity provided to support the broad range of computation and data analytics needs in S&E research; and Category II, Innovative Prototypes/Testbeds: innovative forward-looking capabilities deploying novel technologies, architectures, usage modes, etc., and exploring new target applications, methods, and paradigms for S&E discoveries. Resources supported through awards from this solicitation will be incorporated into and allocated as part of NSF’s Innovative HPC program. This program complements investments in leadership-class computing and funds a federation of nationally-available HPC resources that are technically diverse and intended to enable discoveries at a computational scale beyond the research of individual or regional academic institutions. NSF anticipates that at least 90% of the provisioned system or services will be available to the S&E community through an open peer-reviewed national allocation process and be supported by community and other support services [such as those currently supported through eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) 2.0 project-managed allocations recommended by the XSEDE Resource Allocation Committee (XRAC), and other activities intended to foster efficient coordination across resources], or an NSF-approved alternative that may emerge. If this is not feasible for the proposed system/services, proposers must clearly explain in detail why this is the case and how they intend to make the proposed system/services available to the national S&E community.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-18-896

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) supports innovative research and development in biomedical informatics and data science. The scope of NLM's interest in these research domains is broad, with emphasis on new methods and approaches to foster data driven discovery in the biomedical and clinical health sciences as well as domain-independent, reusable approaches to discovery, curation, analysis, organization and management of health-related digital objects. Biomedical informatics and data science draw upon many fields, including mathematics, statistics, information science, computer science and engineering, and social/behavioral sciences. Application domains include health care delivery, basic biomedical research, clinical and translational research, precision medicine, public health, biosurveillance, health information management in disasters, and similar areas. NLM defines biomedical informatics as the science of optimal representation, organization, management, integration and presentation of information relevant to human health and biology. NIH defines data science as the interdisciplinary field of inquiry in which quantitative and analytical approaches, processes, and systems are developed and used to extract knowledge and insights from increasingly large and/or complex sets of data.

Agency Documentation

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Defense

Office of Naval Research - N00014-19-S-SN08

This announcement describes a research thrust entitled "Science of Artificial Intelligence – Basic and Applied Research for the Naval Domain" to be launched under Fiscal Year (FY) 19 Long Range Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) for the Navy and Marine Corps Science and Technology, N00014-19-S-B001 (and any amendments), which can be found at https://www.onr.navy.mil/en/work-with-us/funding-opportunities/announcements This Special Notice is not a solicitation. Anyone interested in submitting a white paper or full proposal for any of the research opportunities described below shall follow the submission requirements and procedures set forth in the FY19 Long Range BAA and any supplemental guidance provided in this Special Notice.

NAVAIR - N00421-19-S-0002

The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division (NAWCAD) is interested in receiving white papers for Research and Development Projects which offer potential for advancement and improvement of NAWCAD operations. See attachment, NAWCAD Office-Wide BAA N00421-19-S-0002, for further details.

Agency Documentation

Dept. of the Army -- USAMRAA - W81XWH-19-DMRDP-AIMM

The U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command’s mission is to responsively and responsibly create, develop, deliver, and sustain medical capabilities for the Warfighter. The AIMM initiative was created to accelerate transformational biomedical research for our Armed Forces and Nation. The mission of the AIMM initiative is to encourage, identify, and enable innovative research that leads to cross-cutting solutions to military health threats. The AIMM Research Award is intended to support highly creative and conceptually innovative high-risk research with the potential to accelerate critical discoveries or major advancements that will significantly impact military health and medicine. AIMM initiative funding supports novel research concepts and other efforts that initiate or enhance potential game-changers that may not be supported by other funding mechanisms or core programs.

Air Force Office of Scientific Research - FA9550-19-S-0003

AFOSR plans, coordinates, and executes the Air Force Research Laboratory’s (AFRL) basic research program in response to technical guidance from AFRL and requirements of the Air Force. Additionally, the office fosters, supports, and conducts research within Air Force, university, and industry laboratories; and ensures transition of research results to support U.S. Air Force needs. The focus of AFOSR is on research areas that offer significant and comprehensive benefits to our national war fighting and peacekeeping capabilities. These areas are organized and managed in two scientific Departments: Engineering and Information Science (RTA) and Physical and Biological Sciences (RTB). The research activities managed within each Department are summarized in this section.

Agency Documentation

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Education

National Institutes of Health - RFA-DA-20-006

The purpose of this FOA is to attract data and computational scientists to propose novel ways to integrate data of different types and scales to allow new types of analysis. It is expected that with the development and application of novel computational, bioinformatics, statistical, and analytical approaches, previously inaccessible insights will reveal new aspects of addiction biology.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-310

This Funding Opportunity from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) will use a NIH Small Research Grant (R03) award mechanism to support studies that apply affective, cognitive and behavioral science approaches to research questions relevant to substance use disorders (SUD). With this R03 mechanism, NIDA aims to seed innovative affective, cognitive and behavioral hypotheses, models, and methods in preclinical and clinical SUD research. The B/START R03 is intended for recently-independent investigators with expertise in behavioral science as well as established investigators who are using behavioral science approaches to SUD for the first time. Studies supported by B/START are expected to produce a coherent set of preliminary findings that would inform the design of a more complete study and serve as preliminary data supporting feasibility or scientific rationale in an R01, R21 or similar application.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-522

The NSF Research Traineeship (NRT) program is designed to encourage the development and implementation of bold, new, and potentially transformative models for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) graduate education training. The NRT program seeks proposals that explore ways for graduate students in research-based master’s and doctoral degree programs to develop the skills, knowledge, and competencies needed to pursue a range of STEM careers. The program is dedicated to effective training of STEM graduate students in high priority interdisciplinary or convergent research areas, through the use of a comprehensive traineeship model that is innovative, evidence-based, and aligned with changing workforce and research needs. Proposals are requested in any interdisciplinary or convergent research theme of national priority, with special emphasis on the research areas in NSF's 10 Big Ideas. The NSF research Big Ideas are Harnessing the Data Revolution (HDR), The Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier (FW-HTF), Navigating the New Arctic (NNA), Windows on the Universe: The Era of Multi-Messenger Astrophysics (WoU), The Quantum Leap: Leading the Next Quantum Revolution (QL), and Understanding the Rules of Life: Predicting Phenotype (URoL). The NRT program addresses workforce development, emphasizing broad participation, and institutional capacity building needs in graduate education. Strategic collaborations with the private sector, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), government agencies, national laboratories, field stations, teaching and learning centers, informal science centers, and academic partners are encouraged. NRT especially welcomes proposals that will pair well with the efforts of NSF Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science (INCLUDES) to develop STEM talent from all sectors and groups in our society (https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/nsfincludes/index.jsp). Collaborations are encouraged between NRT proposals and existing NSF INCLUDES projects, provided the collaboration strengthens both projects.

Agency Documentation

Administration for Children and Families - OPRE - HHS-2020-ACF-OPRE-PE-1566

ACF plans to fund Career Pathways Secondary Data Analysis Grants to support secondary analysis of data collected to rigorously evaluate a collection of career pathways programs. Career pathways programs provide post-secondary education and training organized as a series of manageable steps leading to successively higher credentials and employment opportunities in growing occupations. Programs also provide financial, academic, and non-academic support to help primarily low-income, non-traditional students enroll and persist in education. OPRE oversees a robust research portfolio evaluating the implementation and effectiveness of career pathways programs including the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) Evaluation and the rigorous evaluation of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program (more information is available at https://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre/research/project/career-pathways-research-portfolio and www.career-pathways.org). Data from PACE, the HPOG National Implementation Evaluation (NIE), and the HPOG Impact Study will be archived at a data repository and available for secondary analysis in early 2019. OPRE expects the archived data will be available as restricted-use files. These grants would support rigorous, policy-relevant secondary analysis of the core data sets to add to the body of knowledge and gain a deeper understanding of the implementation and effectiveness of career pathways programs. Award funding depends on availability and continued interest of the government.

National Science Foundation - 17-590

The fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) hold much promise as sectors of the economy where we can expect to see continuous vigorous growthin the coming decades. STEM job creation is expected to outpace non-STEM job creation significantly, according to the Commerce Department, reflecting the importance of STEM knowledge to the US economy. The National Science Foundation (NSF) plays a leadership role in development and implementation of efforts to enhance and improve STEM education in the United States. Through the NSF Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE) initiative, the agency continues to make a substantial commitment to the highest caliber undergraduate STEM education through a Foundation-wide framework of investments. The IUSE: EHR program is a core NSF undergraduate STEM education program that seeks to improve the effectiveness of undergraduate STEM education for both majors and non-majors. The program is open to application from all institutions of higher education and associated organizations. NSF places high value on educating students to be leaders and innovators in emerging and rapidly changing STEM fields as well as educating a scientifically literate populace. In pursuit of this goal, IUSE: EHR supports projects that have the potential to improve student learning in STEM through development of new curricular materials and methods of instruction, and development of new assessment tools to measure student learning. In addition to innovative work at the frontier of STEM education, this program also encourages replications of research studies at different types of institutions and with different student bodies to produce deeper knowledge about the effectiveness and transferability of findings. IUSE: EHR also seeks to support projects that have high potential for broader societal impacts, including improved diversity of students and instructors participating in STEM education, professional development for instructors to ensure adoption of new and effective pedagogical techniques that meet the changing needs of students, and projects that promote institutional partnerships for collaborative research and development. IUSE: EHR especially welcomes proposals that will pair well with the efforts of NSF INCLUDES (https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/nsfincludes/index.jsp) to develop STEM talent from all sectors and groups in our society. Collaborations are encouraged between IUSE proposals and existing INCLUDES projects, provided the collaboration strengthens both projects. For all the above objectives, the National Science Foundation invests primarily in evidence-based and evidence-generating approaches to understand and improve STEM learning and learning environments, improve the diversity of STEM students and majors, and prepare STEM majors for the workforce. In addition to contributing to STEM education in the host institution(s), proposals should have the promise of adding more broadly to our understanding of effective teaching and learning practices. The IUSE: EHR program recognizes and respects the variety of discipline-specific challenges and opportunities facing STEM faculty as they strive to incorporate results from educational research into classroom practice and work with education research colleagues and social science scholars to advance our understanding of effective teaching and learning. Toward these ends the program features two tracks: (1) Engaged Student Learning and (2) Institutional and Community Transformation. Two tiers of projects exist within each track: (i) Exploration and Design and (ii) Development and Implementation. Exploration and Design Development and Implementation Engaged Student Learning Up to $300K, for up to 3 years Level 1: Up to $600K, for up to 3 years Level 2: $601K-$2M, for up to 5 years Institutional and Community Transformation Up to $300K, for up to 3 years Up to $3M, for up to 5 years

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 17-585

The Innovations in Graduate Education (IGE) program is designed to encourage the development and implementation of bold, new, and potentially transformative approaches to STEM graduate education training. The program seeks proposals that explore ways forgraduate students in research-based master’s and doctoral degree programs to develop the skills, knowledge, and competencies needed to pursue a range of STEM careers. IGE focuses on projects aimed at piloting, testing, and validating innovative and potentially transformative approaches to graduate education. IGE projects are intendedto generate the knowledge required for their customization, implementation, and broader adoption. The program supports testing of novel models or activities with high potential to enrich and extend the knowledge base on effective graduate education approaches. The program addresses both workforce development, emphasizing broad participation, and institutional capacity building needs in graduate education. Strategic collaborations with the private sector, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), government agencies, national laboratories, field stations, teaching and learning centers, informal science centers, and academic partners are encouraged.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 17-575

NSF's Directorate for Engineering (ENG) and the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) have joined to support the Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) in Engineering and Computer Science program. This program supports active long-term collaborative partnerships between K-12 Science, Technology, Engineering, Computer and Information Science, and Mathematics (STEM) in-service and pre-service teachers, full-time community college faculty, and university faculty and studentsto enhance the scientific disciplinary knowledge and capacity of the STEM teachers and/or community college facultythrough participation inauthentic summer research experiences with engineering and computer science faculty researchers. The research projects and experiences all revolve around a focused research area related to engineering and/or computer science that will provide a common cohort experience to the participating educators. The K-12 STEM teachers and/or full-time community college faculty also translate their research experiences and new scientific knowledge into their classroom activities and curricula. The university team will include faculty, graduate and undergraduate students as well as industrial advisors. Involvement of graduate students in support of academic-year classroom activities is particularly encouraged. Partnerships with inner city, rural or other high needs schools are especially encouraged, as is participation by underrepresented minorities, women, veterans, and persons with disabilities. As part of the long-term partnership arrangements, university undergraduate/graduate students will partner with pre-college/community college faculty in their classrooms during the academic year to support the integration of the RET curricular materials into classroom activities. This announcement features two mechanisms for support of in-service and pre-service K-12 STEM teachers and full-time community college faculty: (1) RET supplements to ongoing ENG and CISE awards and (2) new RET Site awards. RET supplements may be included outside this solicitation in proposals for new or renewedENG and CISEgrants or as supplements to ongoing ENG- and CISE-funded projects. RET in Engineering and Computer Science Sites, through this solicitation, are based on independent proposals from engineering and/or computer and/or information science departments, schools or colleges to initiate and conduct research participation projects for K-12 STEM teachers and/or full-time community college faculty.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 17-573

The Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL) program seeks to advance new approaches to and evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learningopportunities forthe public in informal environments; provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments; and engage the public of all ages in learning STEM in informal environments. The AISL program supports six types of projects: (1) Pilots and Feasibility Studies, (2) Research in Service to Practice, (3) Innovations in Development, (4) Broad Implementation, (5)Literature Reviews, Syntheses, or Meta-Analyses, and (6) Conferences.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 17-527

A well-educated science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce is a significant contributor to maintaining the competitiveness of the U.S. in the global economy. The National Science Foundation (NSF) Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) program addresses the need for a high quality STEM workforce in STEM disciplines supported by the program and for the increased success of low-income academically talented students with demonstrated financial need who are pursuing associate, baccalaureate, or graduate degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) [6], [16]. Recognizing that financial aid alone cannot increase retention and graduation in STEM, the program provides awards to Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) to fund scholarships and to advance the adaptation, implementation, and study of effective evidence-based curricular and co-curricular activities that support recruitment, retention, transfer (if appropriate), student success, academic/career pathways, and graduation in STEM. The S-STEM program encourages collaborations among different types of partners: Partnerships among different types of institutions; collaborations of STEM faculty and institutional, educational, and social science researchers; and partnerships among institutions of higher education and local business and industry, if appropriate. The program seeks: 1) to increase the number of low-income academically talented students with demonstrated financial need obtaining degrees in STEM and entering the workforce or graduate programs in STEM; 2) to improve the education of future scientists, engineers, and technicians, with a focus on academically talented low-income students; and 3) to generate knowledge to advance understanding of how factors or evidence-based curricular and co-curricular activities affect the success, retention, transfer, academic/career pathways, and graduation in STEM of low-income students. The STEM disciplines supported by the S-STEM program include: Biological sciences (except medicine and other clinical fields); Physical sciences (including physics, chemistry, astronomy, and materials science); Mathematical sciences; Computer and information sciences; Geosciences; Engineering; and Technology areas associated with the preceding disciplines (for example, biotechnology, chemical technology, engineering technology, information technology, etc.) The S-STEM program particularly encourages proposals from 2-year institutions, Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs), Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs), tribal colleges, and urban public and rural institutions.

Agency Documentation

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Energy

Office of Science - DE-FOA-0001968

The Office of Science (SC) of the Department of Energy hereby announces its continuing interest in receiving grant applications for support of work in the following program areas: Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Basic Energy Sciences, Biological and Environmental Research, Fusion Energy Sciences, High Energy Physics, and Nuclear Physics. On September 3, 1992, DOE published in the Federal Register the Office of Energy Research Financial Assistance Program (now called the Office of Science Financial Assistance Program), 10 CFR 605, as a Final Rule, which contained a solicitation for this program. Information about submission of applications, eligibility, limitations, evaluation and selection processes and other policies and procedures are specified in 10 CFR 605. This FOA (DE-FOA-0001968) is our annual, broad, open solicitation that covers all of the research areas in the Office of Science and is open throughout the Fiscal Year. This FOA will remain open until September 30, 2019, 11:59 PM Eastern Time, or until it is succeeded by another issuance, whichever occurs first. This annual FOA (DE-FOA-0001968) succeeds FOA DE-FOA-0001820, which was published May 25, 2018.

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Engineering

National Science Foundation - 19-585

The International Research Experiences for Students (IRES) program supports international research and research-related activities for U.S. science and engineering students. The IRES program contributes to development of a diverse, globally-engaged workforce with world-class skills. IRES focuses on active research participation by undergraduate or graduate students in high quality international research, education and professional development experiences in NSF-funded research areas. The overarching, long-term goal of the IRES program is to enhance U.S. leadership in research and education and to strengthen economic competitiveness through training the next generation of research leaders. This solicitation features three mechanisms; proposers are required to select one of the following tracks to submit their proposal. Track I focuses on the development of world-class research skills in international cohort experiences. Track II is dedicated to targeted, intensive learning and training opportunities that leverage international knowledge at the frontiers of research. Track III supports U.S. institutional collaborations to develop, implement and evaluate innovative models for high-impact, large-scale international research and professional development experiences for U.S. graduate students. Student participants supported by IRES funds must be citizens, nationals, or permanent residents of the United States. Students do not apply directly to NSF to participate in IRES activities. Students apply to NSF-funded investigators who receive IRES awards. To identify appropriate IRES projects, students should consult the directory of active IRES awards. All PIs, co-PIs and Senior Personnel on IRES proposals must be from U.S. based institutions. IRES - Track I: IRES Sites (IS) projects engage a group of undergraduate and/or graduate students in active high-quality collaborative research at an international site with mentorship from researchers at a host lab. IRES Sites must be organized around a coherent intellectual theme that may involve a single discipline or multiple disciplines funded by NSF. IRES - Track II: Advanced Studies Institutes (ASI) are intensive short courses with related activities that engage advanced graduate students in active learning and research at the frontiers of knowledge. ASIs typically range in length from ten to twenty-one days and must be held outside the United States. ASIs must have a compelling rationale for their international location and should involve distinguished active researchers in the target field from the U.S. and abroad. ASIs should enable students to develop skills and broaden professional networks, leveraging international participation and complementary resources (expertise, facilities, data, field site, etc.) for mutual benefit. IRES - Track III: New Concepts in International Graduate Experience (IGE) The IGE IRES track invites teams of PIs to propose, implement, evaluate and disseminate innovative large-scale programs (models) for providing high-quality international research and research-related professional development experiences to U.S. graduate students. The PIs should explain how their innovative program (model) could potentially be adaptable beyond the immediate disciplinary fields involved in their proposal. The proposals should be designed from the viewpoint of graduate-level STEM research/training, and globally engaged STEM workforce development. The proposals should be grounded in relevant literature on graduate STEM research/training, education, and graduate level international experiences. U.S. graduate students recruited from a broad, diverse applicant pool should travel to non-U.S. locations for periods of several weeks to a semester for immersive experiences under the mentorship of appropriate collaborators. The proposed international graduate research experience model may focus on research and research-related activities in any NSF-funded area(s). Proposals that utilize, leverage and expand existing global networks and infrastructure are strongly encouraged.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - PD-19-7680

NSF seeks to strengthen the future U.S. Engineering workforce by enabling the participation of all citizens through the support of research in the science of Broadening Participation in Engineering (BPE). The BPE program is a dedicated to supporting the development of a diverse and well-prepared engineering workforce. BPE focuses on enhancing the diversity and inclusion of all underrepresented populations in engineering, including gender identity and expression, race and ethnicity (African Americans/Blacks, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Native Pacific Islanders), disability, LGBTQ+, first generation college and socio-economic status. BPE funds research to Understand and analyze the systemic barriers that prevent underrepresented groups from pursuing and succeeding in engineering, for example, understand the problem of insufficient interest and poorly sustained participation in engineering across underrepresented demographic groups; insignificant preparation and scarce opportunities for members of underrepresented groups to learn meaningful, relevant engineering content. Understand and analyze factors that enhance our ability to increase access to engineering by creating support systems and social networks that raise career awareness about different engineering pathways. Develop innovative methods and projects to significantly impact the recruitment and retention of engineering students from underrepresented groups. Activities must be supported by relevant data and have the capability to produce a model that can be replicated in other contexts. Develop innovative methods and projects to aggressively recruit and retain tenure track faculty from underrepresented groups. Design and transform culture to make diversity, equity, and inclusion a priority in the engineering enterprise. BPE research activities will provide scientific evidence that engineering educators, employers, and policy makers need to make informed decisions to design effective programs that broaden the participation of persons from historically underrepresented groups in the engineering workforce. BPE is interested in funding research that spans K-12 to workforce and offers the greatest return on investment. BPE funded research should produce outcomes that are scalable, sustainable, and applicable to various contexts, settings, and demographics within the engineering enterprise. BPE is particularly interested in research that employs intersectional approaches in recognition that gender, race and ethnicity do not exist in isolation from each other and from other categories of social identity. BPE is equally interested in research activities that align with and provide meaningful connections to the NSF INCLUDES National Network. The overarching goal of NSF INCLUDES is to achieve significant impact at scale in transforming STEM education and workforce development by educating a diverse, STEM-capable workforce that includes talented individuals from all sectors of the Nation's population. Collaborations are encouraged between BPE proposals and existing NSF INCLUDES projects, for example, the NSF INCLUDES Alliances and Coordination Hub, provided these collaborations strengthen both the BPE and NSF INCLUDES projects. Before submitting a proposal to the BPE program, prospective Principal Investigators are strongly encouraged to speak to the program director to obtain guidance as to whether the proposed ideas are aligned with the strategic goals of the BPE program. Proposal Elements All BPE proposals should Be informed by the current theoretical and scientific literature as well as add to the extant knowledge base. Directly address how the work will broaden the participation of one or more underrepresented populations in engineering. Provide appropriate justification to support selection of the targeted group(s), with specific and applicable objectives, and demonstrate applicable knowledge of the relevant literature on underrepresentation. Integrate a mechanism to assess and evaluate how well the project has achieved the stated objectives as part of the project management plan. Provide evidence of clear, measurable outcomes and consideration of how the strategy will advance knowledge beyond localized contexts. Incorporate a dissemination plan that goes beyond publishing research papers and presenting at conferences. PIs should think creatively about who needs to hear about the research for it to have an impact, and develop a strategy to reach that audience. Describe how the outcomes have the potential to enhance diversity and inclusion of underrepresented populations in engineering. The Project Summary must contain a list of 3-5 keywords. Place the keywords on a separate line at the end of the Overview section of the Project Summary.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-506

The Partnerships for Innovation (PFI) Program within the Division of Industrial Innovation and Partnerships (IIP) offers researchers from all disciplines of science and engineering funded by NSF the opportunity to perform translational research and technology development, catalyze partnerships and accelerate the transition of discoveries from the laboratory to the marketplace for societal benefit. PFI has five broad goals, as set forth by the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act of 2017 (“the Act”, S.3084 — 114th Congress; Sec. 602. Translational Research Grants): (1) identifying and supporting NSF-sponsored research and technologies that have the potential for accelerated commercialization; (2) supporting prior or current NSF-sponsored investigators, institutions of higher education, and non-profit organizations that partner with an institution of higher education in undertaking proof-of-concept work, including the development of technology prototypes that are derived from NSF-sponsored research and have potential market value; (3) promoting sustainable partnerships between NSF-funded institutions, industry, and other organizations within academia and the private sector with the purpose of accelerating the transfer of technology; (4) developing multi-disciplinary innovation ecosystems which involve and are responsive to the specific needs of academia and industry; (5) providing professional development, mentoring, and advice in entrepreneurship, project management, and technology and business development to innovators. In addition, PFI responds to the mandate set by Congress in Section 601(c)(3) of the Act (Follow-on Grants), to support prototype or proof-of-concept development work by participants, including I-Corps participants, with innovations that because of the early stage of development are not eligible to participate in a Small Business Innovation Research Program or a Small Business Technology Transfer Program. Finally, PFI seeks to implement the mandate set by Congress in Section 102(c)(a) of the Act (Broader Impacts Review Criterion Update) by enhancing partnerships between academia and industry in the United States, and expanding the participation of women and individuals from underrepresented groups in innovation, technology translation, and entrepreneurship. This solicitation offers two broad tracks for proposals in pursuit of the aforementioned goals: The Technology Translation (PFI-TT) track offers the opportunity to translate prior NSF-funded research results in any field of science or engineering into technological innovations with promising commercial potential and societal impact. PFI-TT supports commercial potential demonstration projects for academic research outputs in any NSF-funded science and engineering discipline. This demonstration is achieved through proof-of-concept, prototyping, technology development and/or scale-up work. Concurrently, students and postdoctoral researchers who participate in PFI-TT projects receive education and leadership training in innovation and entrepreneurship. Successful PFI-TT projects generate technology-driven commercialization outcomes that address societal needs. The Research Partnerships (PFI-RP) track seeks to achieve the same goals as the PFI-TT track by supporting instead complex, multi-faceted technology development projects that are typically beyond the scope of a single researcher or institution and require a multi-organizational, interdisciplinary, synergistic collaboration. A PFI-RP project requires the creation of partnerships between academic researchers and third-party organizations such as industry, non-academic research organizations, federal laboratories, public or non-profit technology transfer organizations or other universities. Such partnerships are needed to conduct applied research on a stand-alone larger project toward commercialization and societal impact. In the absence of such synergistic partnership, the project’s likelihood for success would be minimal. The intended outcomes of both PFI-TT and PFI-RP tracks are: a) the commercialization of new intellectual property derived from NSF-funded research outputs; b) the creation of new or broader collaborations with industry (including increased corporate sponsored research); c) the licensing of NSF-funded research outputs to third party corporations or to start-up companies funded by a PFI team; and d) the training of future innovation and entrepreneurship leaders. WEBINARS: Webinars will be held to answer questions about the solicitation. Registration will be available on the NSF Partnerships for Innovation website (https://www.nsf.gov/PFI). Potential proposers and their partners are encouraged to attend.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - PD-19-072Y

The Engineering Design and Systems Engineering (EDSE) program supports fundamental research into the basic processes and phenomena of engineering design and systems engineering. The program seeks proposals leading to improved understanding about how processes, organizational structure, social interactions, strategic decision making, and other factors impact success in the planning and execution of engineering design and systems engineering projects. It also supports advances pertaining to engineering design and systems engineering in areas that include, but are not limited to, decision making under uncertainty, including preference and demand modeling; problem decomposition and decision delegation; applications of reverse game theory (mechanism design); computer-aided design; design representation; system performance modeling and prediction; design optimization; uncertainty quantification; domain- or concern-specific design methods; and advanced computational techniques for supporting effective human cognition, decision making, and collaboration. Competitive proposals for novel methods will include a plan to evaluate rigorously the effectiveness and performance of the proposed approach. The EDSE program encourages multidisciplinary collaborations of experts in design and systems engineering with experts in other domains. Of particular interest is research on the design of engineering material systems that leverages the unique aspects of a particular material system to realize advanced design methods that are driven by performance metrics and incorporate processing/manufacturing considerations. The EDSE program does not support the development of ad-hoc approaches that lack grounding in theory, nor does it support design activities that do not advance scientific knowledge about engineering design or systems engineering. Prospective investigators are encouraged to discuss research ideas and project scope with the Program Director in advance of proposal preparation and submission.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - PD-18-7643

TheEnvironmental Sustainabilityprogram is part of theEnvironmental Engineering and Sustainabilitycluster, which also includes 1) Environmental Engineering; and 2) Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials. Thegoal of theEnvironmental Sustainabilityprogram is to promote sustainable engineered systems that support human well-being and that are also compatible with sustaining natural (environmental) systems.These systems provide ecological services vital for human survival.Research efforts supported by the program typically consider long time horizons and may incorporate contributions from the social sciences and ethics. The program supports engineering research that seeks to balance society's need to provide ecological protection and maintain stable economic conditions. There are four principal general research areas that are supported: IndustrialEcology: Topics of interest inIndustrial Ecologyinclude advancements in modeling such as life cycle assessment, materials flow analysis, input/output economic models, and novel metrics for measuringsustainable systems.Innovations in industrial ecology are encouraged. Green Engineering: Research is encouraged to advance the sustainability ofmanufacturing processes, green buildings, andinfrastructure.Many programs in the Engineering Directorate supportresearch in environmentally benign manufacturing or chemicalprocesses.The Environmental Sustainability program supportsresearch that would affect more than one chemical or manufacturing processor that takes a systems or holistic approach to green engineering for infrastructure or green buildings.Improvements in distribution and collection systems that will advance smart growth strategies andameliorate effects of growth are research areas that are supported by Environmental Sustainability.Innovations in management of storm water,recycling and reuse of drinking water, and other greenengineering techniques to support sustainability may also be fruitfulareas for research.NOTE: Water treatment proposals are to besubmitted to the CBET Environmental Engineering program (1440), NOT the Environmental Sustainability program (7643). Ecological Engineering:Topics should focus on the engineering aspects ofrestoring ecological function to natural systems.Engineering research in the enhancement of natural capital to foster sustainabledevelopment is encouraged. Earth Systems Engineering: Earth systems engineeringconsiders aspects of large scale engineering research that involve mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions, adaptation to climate change, and other global scaleconcerns. All proposed research should be driven by engineering principles, and be presented explicitly in an environmental sustainability context. Proposals should include involvement in engineering research of at least one graduate student, as well as undergraduates.Incorporation of aspects of social, behavioral, and economic sciences is welcomed. Innovative proposals outside the scope of the four core areas mentioned above may be considered. However, prior to submission, it is recommended that the PI contact the Program Director to avoid the possibility of the proposal being returned without review. For proposals that call for research to be done outside of the United States, an explanation must be presented of the potential benefit of the research for the United States. The duration of unsolicited awards is generally one to three years.The typical award size for the program is around $100,000 per year. Proposals requesting a substantially higher amountthan this, without prior consultation with the Program Director, may be returned without review. INFORMATION COMMON TO MOST CBET PROGRAMS Proposals should address the novelty and/orpotentially transformative natureof the proposed work compared to previous work in the field.Also, it is important to address why the proposed work is important in terms of engineering science, as well as to also project the potential impact on society and/or industry of success in the research.The novelty or potentially transformative nature of the research should be included, as a minimum, in the Project Summary of each proposal. Faculty Early Career Development(CAREER)program proposals are strongly encouraged. Award duration is five years.The submission deadline for Engineering CAREER proposals is in July every year. Please see the CAREER URLherefor more information. Proposals for Conferences, Workshops, and Supplements: PIs are strongly encouraged to discuss their requests with the Program Director before submission of the proposal. Grants forRapid Response Research(RAPID)andEArly-concept Grants for Exploratory Research(EAGER)are also considered when appropriate. Please note that proposals of these types must be discussed with the program director before submission.Further details are available in theProposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide(PAPPG)download found here.Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry (GOALI)proposals that integrate fundamental research with translational results and are consistent with the application areas of interest to each program are also encouraged. Please note that GOALI proposals must be submitted during the annual unsolicited proposal window for each program. More information on GOALI can be foundhere. COMPLIANCE: Proposals which are not compliant with theProposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide (PAPPG)will be returned without review.

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Geosciences

National Science Foundation - 19-594

To address ecological questions that cannot be resolved with short-term observations or experiments, NSF established the Long-Term Ecological Research Program (LTER) in 1980. Two components differentiate LTER research from projects supported by other NSF programs: 1) the research is located at specific sites chosen to represent major ecosystem types or natural biomes, and 2) it emphasizes the study of ecological phenomena over long periods of time based on data collected in five core areas. Long-term studies are critical to achieve an integrated understanding of how components of ecosystems interact as well as to test ecological theory. Ongoing research at LTER sites contributes to the development and testing of fundamental ecological theories and significantly advances understanding of the long-term dynamics of populations, communities and ecosystems. It often integrates multiple disciplines and, through cross-site interactions may examine patterns or processes over broad spatial scales. Recognizing that the value of long-term data extends beyond use at any individual site, NSF requires that data collected by all LTER sites be made publicly accessible. The LTER program has long recognized the importance of humans in ecological systems and is especially interested in how human activities in urban settings interact with natural processes to determine ecological outcomes. Factors that control urban ecosystems are not only environmental, but also social and economic. These factors and their interactions need to be considered to understand urban ecosystems over long time frames and broad spatial scales.

Agency Documentation

Department of Commerce - NOAA-NOS-IOOS-2020-2006167

The U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS®) is a national and regional partnership working to provide ocean, coastal and Great Lakes observations, data, tools, and forecasts to improve safety, enhance the economy, and protect our environment. To increase observational and technical capabilities we need smart investments to innovate sensors, data management, decision support products, and other technical capabilities that will improve our ability to monitor and forecast environmental conditions with greater efficiency. The primary objective of IOOS’ Ocean Technology Transition Project (OTT) is to reduce the Research to Operations transition period for ocean observing, product development, and data management technologies for the ocean, coastal and Great Lakes. The term ‘Technologies’ includes: ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes sensors, Information Technology (data management, data visualization); platform enhancement, and technology modernization efforts. This objective is accomplished by investing in the transition of emerging and promising marine and Great Lakes observing technological capabilities from the mid to latter phases of research into operational status. The National Oceanographic Partnership (NOPP) was established by Congress via Title II, subtitle E, of Public Law 104-201 to promote the national goals of assuring national security, advancing economic development, protecting quality of life, and strengthening science education and communication by improving knowledge of the ocean. There are over twenty agencies participating in the NOPP. They are identified on the NOPP website: www.nopp.org. U.S. IOOS Program, in conjunction with NOPP, is seeking to fund projects, subject to the availability of funds, which advance new or existing technology-based solutions that address long standing and emerging coastal observing, product development, and data management challenges. The projects will be focused on those technologies for which there are demonstrated operators who commit to integrated, long term use of those technologies and open data sharing. A Transition Manager for the project should be identified and a Transition Plan will be a Year One deliverable. Funding will be targeted to technologies that are sufficiently mature for long term operations. This announcement specifically funds activities needed to progress these technologies through the transitional stages between research and full operations such as system integration, testing, validation, and verification. Funding will not be awarded to continue projects previously funded through the Ocean Technology Transition Project. In FY 2020-2022, it is estimated that up to $7.5 million will be available from the U.S. IOOS Program. Multiple awards are anticipated, subject to availability of funds, in amounts up to $400,000 per year for up to three years, with some exceptions for highly ranked proposals. Proposals not funded in the current fiscal period may be considered for funding in the next fiscal period (Fiscal Year 2021) without NOAA repeating the competitive process outlined in this announcement. Investigators are highly encouraged to visit the U.S. IOOS Ocean Technology Transition website for more information about the program: https://ioos.noaa.gov/project/ocean-technology- transition/

National Institutes of Health - RFA-ES-19-011

This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is intended to support novel environmental health research in which an unpredictable event or policy change provides a limited window of opportunity to collect human biological samples or environmental exposure data. The primary motivation of the FOA is to understand the consequences of natural and human-made disasters, emerging environmental public health threats, and policy changes in the U.S. and abroad. A distinguishing feature of an appropriate study is the need for rapid review and funding, substantially shorter than the typical NIH grant review/award cycle, for the research question to be addressed and swiftly implemented.

Agency Documentation

Department of Commerce - NOAA-NMFS-FHQ-2020-2006111

The Saltonstall-Kennedy Act established a fund (known as the S-K fund) used by the Secretary of Commerce to provide grants or cooperative agreements for fisheries research and development projects addressing aspects of U.S. fisheries, including, but not limited to, harvesting, processing, marketing, and associated business infrastructures (see section IV, F; Funding Restrictions). Under this authority, grants and cooperative agreements are made on a competitive basis (subject to availability of funding) to assist in carrying out projects to expand domestic and foreign markets related to U.S. commercial and recreational fisheries. The term “fisheries” encompasses wild capture, marine aquaculture and recreational fishing. The objective of the S-K Research Program is to address the needs of the fisheries and fishing communities in optimizing economic benefits by building and maintaining sustainable fisheries and practices, dealing with the impacts of conservation and management measures, and increasing other opportunities to use existing infrastructure to support keeping working waterfronts viable. U.S. fisheries include any fishery, commercial or recreational, that is, or may be, engaged in by citizens or nationals of the United States or other eligible applicants. Proposals submitted to this competition must address at least one of the following priorities: Promotion, Development, and Marketing; Science or Technology that Promotes Sustainable U.S. Seafood Production and Harvesting. This Federal Funding Opportunity (FFO) includes information on application and criteria for research proposals requesting a maximum of $300,000 in Federal funding for up to a two-year period. Matching funds are not required, nor will they be considered during the evaluation process. Awards are anticipated to start no earlier than September 1, 2020.

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency - HM0476-18-BAA-0001

NGA welcomes all innovative ideas for path-breaking research that may advance the GEOINT mission. The NGA mission is to provide timely, relevant, and accurate geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) in support of national security objectives. GEOINT is the exploitation and analysis of imagery and geospatial information to describe, assess, and visually depict physical features and geographically referenced activities on the Earth. GEOINT consists of imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial information. NGA offers a variety of critical GEOINT products in support of U.S. national security objectives and Federal disaster relief, including aeronautical, geodesy, hydrographic, imagery, geospatial and topographical information. The NGA Academic Research Program (NARP) is focused on innovative, far-reaching basic and applied research in science, technology, engineering and mathematics having the potential to advance the GEOINT mission. The objective of the NARP is to support innovative, high-payoff research that provides the basis for revolutionary progress in areas of science and technology affecting the needs and mission of NGA. This research also supports the National System for Geospatial Intelligence (NSG), which is the combination of technology, systems and organizations that gather, produce, distribute and consume geospatial data and information. This research is aimed at advancing GEOINT capabilities by improving analytical methods, enhancing and expanding systems capabilities, and leveraging resources for common NSG goals. The NARP also seeks to improve education in scientific, mathematics, and engineering skills necessary to advance GEOINT capabilities. It is NGA’s intent to solicit fundamental research under this BAA. Fundamental research means basic and applied research in science and engineering, the results of which ordinarily are published and shared broadly within the scientific community, as distinguished from proprietary research and from Industrial development, design, production, and product utilization, the results of which ordinarily are restricted for proprietary or national security reason. (National Security Decision Directive (NSDD) 189, National Policy on the Transfer of Scientific, Technical, and Engineering Information).NGA seeks proposals from eligible U.S. institutions for path-breaking GEOINT research in areas of potential interest to NGA, the DoD, and the Intelligence Community (IC). ** Whitepapers submitted in response to this BAA will be accepted on a continuous, rolling basis through 11:59p.m. EDT on 31 September 2021. **

National Science Foundation - 17-582

The goal of research funded under the interdisciplinary P2C2 solicitation is to utilize key geological, chemical, atmospheric (gas in ice cores), and biological records of climate system variability to provide insights into the mechanisms and rate of change that characterized Earth's past climate variability, the sensitivity of Earth's climate system to changes in forcing, and the response of key components of the Earth system to these changes. Important scientific objectives of P2C2 are to: 1) provide comprehensive paleoclimate data sets that can serve as model test data sets analogous to instrumental observations; and 2) enable transformative syntheses of paleoclimate data and modeling outcomes to understand the response of the longer-term and higher magnitude variability of the climate system that is observed in the geological and cryospheric records.

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Libraries & Museums

Institute of Museum and Library Services - NLG-LIBRARIES-FY20

The National Leadership Grants for Libraries Program (NLG-L) supports projects that enhancethe quality of library and archival services nationwide by advancing theory and practice.

Agency Documentation

Institute of Museum and Library Services - LB21-FY20

The Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program (LB21) supports developing a diverse workforce of librarians to better meet the changing learning and information needs of the American public by: enhancing the training and professional development of library and archives professionals,developing faculty and library leaders, and recruiting, educating, and retaining the next generation of library and archives professionals.

Agency Documentation

National Archives and Records Administration - ENGAGEMENT-201910

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission seeks projects that encourage public engagement with historical records, including the development of new tools that enable people to engage online. The NHPRC is looking for projects that create models and technologies that other institutions can freely adopt. In general, collaborations between archivists, documentary editors, historians, educators, and/or community-based individuals are more likely to create a competitive proposal. Projects that focus on innovative methods to introduce primary source materials and how to use them in multiple locations also are more likely to create a competitive proposal. Projects might create and develop programs to engage people in the study and use of historical records for institutional, educational or personal reasons. For example, an applicant can: • Enlist volunteer “citizen archivists” in projects to accelerate access to historical records, especially those online. This may include, but is not limited to, efforts to identify, tag, transcribe, annotate, or otherwise enhance digitized historical records. • Develop educational programs for K-12 students, undergraduate classes, or community members that encourage them to engage with historical records already in repositories or that are collected as part of the project. • Collect primary source material from people through public gatherings and sponsor discussions or websites about the results. • Use historical records in artistic endeavors. This could include K-12 students, undergraduate classes, or community members. Examples include projects that encourage researching and writing life stories for performance; using record facsimiles in painting, sculpture, or audiovisual collages; or using text as lyrics for music or as music. • Develop technologies that encourage the sharing of information about historical records. For a comprehensive list of the Commission’s limitations on funding, please see “What we do and do not fund” (http://www.archives.gov/nhprc/apply/eligibility.html). Applications that consist entirely of ineligible activities will not be considered. Award Information A grant normally is for one to three years. The Commission expects to make up to three grants of between $50,000 and $150,000. The total amount allocated for this program is up to $275,000. Grants begin no earlier than July 1, 2020. The Commission requires that grant recipients acknowledge NHPRC grant assistance in all publications and other products that result from its support. Eligibility Information Eligible applicants: • Nonprofit organizations or institutions • Colleges, universities, and other academic institutions • State or local government agencies • Federally-acknowledged or state-recognized Native American tribes or groups Cost Sharing The total costs of a project are shared between the NHPRC and the applicant organization. The Commission provides no more than 50 per cent of total project costs in the Public Engagement with Historical Records category. NHPRC grant recipients are not permitted to use grant funds for indirect costs (as indicated in 2 CFR 2600.101). The applicant’s financial contribution may include both direct and indirect expenses, in-kind contributions, non-Federal third-party contributions, and any income earned directly by the project. Indirect costs must be listed under the applicant’s cost sharing contribution. Other Requirements Applicant organizations must be registered in the System for Award Management (SAM) prior to submitting an application, maintain SAM registration throughout the application and award process, and include a valid DUNS number in their application. Details on SAM registration and requesting a DUNS number can be found at the System for Award Management website at www.sam.gov. Please refer to the User Guides section and the Grants Registrations PDF. A complete application includes the Application for Federal Assistance (Standard Form 424), Assurances -- Non-Construction Programs (Standard Form 424B), a Project Narrative, Summary, Supplementary Materials, and Budget. Applications lacking these items will not be considered. Ineligible applications will not be reviewed.

Agency Documentation

National Archives and Records Administration - PRELIM-202001

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission seeks projects that will significantly improve public discovery and use of major historical records collections. The Commission is especially interested in collections of America’s early legal records, such as the records of colonial, territorial, county, and early statehood and tribal proceedings that document the evolution of the nation’s legal history. All types of historical records are eligible, including documents, photographs, born-digital records, and analog audio and moving images. Projects may: • Digitize historical records collections, or related collections, held by a single institution and make them freely available online • Provide access to born-digital records • Create new freely-available virtual collections drawn from historical records held by multiple institutions • Create new tools and methods for users to access records The NHPRC welcomes collaborative projects, particularly for bringing together related records from multiple institutions. Projects that address significant needs in the field and result in replicable and scalable approaches will be more competitive. We also encourage organizations to actively engage the public in the work of the project. Applicants should also consult Access to Historical Records: Archival Projects program, which has different requirements and award amounts. For a comprehensive list of Commission limitations on funding, please see: "What we do and do not fund" (http://www.archives.gov/nhprc/apply/eligibility.html). Applications that consist entirely of ineligible activities will not be considered. Award Information A grant is for one to three years and for between $100,000 and $350,000. We expect to make up to five grants in this category for a total of up to $1,000,000. Grants begin no earlier than January 1, 2021. The Commission requires that grant recipients acknowledge NHPRC grant assistance in all publications and other products that result from its support. Eligibility Eligible applicants: • Nonprofit organizations or institutions • Colleges, universities, and other academic institutions • State or local government agencies • Federally-acknowledged or state-recognized Native American tribes or groups Cost Sharing The total costs of a project are shared between the NHPRC and the applicant organization. The Commission provides no more than 50 per cent of total project costs in the Access to Historical Records: Major Initiatives category. NHPRC grant recipients are not permitted to use grant funds for indirect costs (as indicated in 2 CFR 2600.101). Cost sharing is required. The applicant's financial contribution may include both direct and indirect expenses, in-kind contributions, non-Federal third-party contributions, and any income earned directly by the project. Indirect costs must be listed under the applicant's cost sharing contribution. Other Requirements Applicant organizations must be registered in the System for Award Management (SAM) prior to submitting an application, maintain SAM registration throughout the application and award process, and include a valid DUNS number in their application. Details on SAM registration and requesting a DUNS number can be found at the System for Award Management website at https://sam.gov. Please refer to the User Guides section and the Grants Registrations PDF. A complete preliminary application includes the Application for Federal Assistance (Standard Form 424), a Project Narrative, and Budget. Applications lacking these items will not be considered. Ineligible applications will not be reviewed.

Agency Documentation

National Archives and Records Administration - EDITIONS-201910

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission seeks proposals to publish documentary editions of historical records. Projects may focus on broad historical movements in U.S. history, such as politics, law (including the social and cultural history of the law), social reform, business, military, the arts, and other aspects of the national experience, or may be centered on the papers of major figures from American history. Whether conceived as a thematic or a biographical edition, the historical value of the records and their expected usefulness to broad audiences must justify the costs of the project. The goal of this program is to provide access to, and editorial context for, the historical documents and records that tell the American story. Applicants should demonstrate familiarity with the best practices recommended by the Association for Documentary Editing or the Modern Language Association Committee on Scholarly Editions. All new projects (those which have never received NHPRC funding) must have definitive plans for publishing and preserving a digital edition which provides online access to a searchable collection of documents. New projects may also prepare print editions (including ebooks and searchable PDFs posted online) as part of their overall publishing plan, but the contents of those volumes must be published in a fully-searchable digital edition within a reasonable period of time following print publication. The NHPRC encourages projects to provide free access to online editions. Projects that do not have definitive plans for digital dissemination and preservation in place at the time of application will not be considered. Grants are awarded for collecting, describing, preserving, compiling, transcribing, annotating, editing, encoding, and publishing documentary source materials online and in print. Eligible documentary edition projects typically focus on original manuscript or typewritten documents, but may also include other formats, such as analog audio and/or born-digital records. Because of the focus on documentary sources, grants do not support preparation of critical editions of published works unless such works are just a small portion of the larger project. For a comprehensive list of the Commission's limitations on funding, please see What We Do and Do Not Fund. Applications that consist entirely of ineligible activities will not be considered. Ongoing projects: Applicants from ongoing projects must demonstrate that they have successfully achieved the performance objectives associated with previous NHPRC awards; provide updated, current information, including a description of the new activities; describe the content and historical significance of the specific materials to be edited during the proposed grant period; show progress towards completing the edition; and justify costs in a new budget. Award Information A grant is for one or two years and for up to $200,000 per year. The Commission expects to make up to 25 grants in this category for a total of up to $3,000,000. Grants begin no earlier than January 1, 2020. The Commission requires that grant recipients acknowledge NHPRC grant assistance in all publications, publicity, and other products that result from its support. Eligibility U.S. nonprofit organizations or institutions U.S. colleges, universities, and other academic institutions State or local government agencies Federally-acknowledged or state-recognized Native American tribes or groups Cost Sharing The total costs of a project are shared between the NHPRC and the applicant organization. The Commission provides no more than 50 per cent of total project costs in the Publishing Historical Records in Documentary Editions category. NHPRC grant recipients are not permitted to use grant funds for indirect costs (as indicated in 2 CFR 2600.101). Cost sharing is required. The applicant’s financial contribution may include both direct and indirect expenses, in-kind contributions, non-Federal third-party contributions, and any income earned directly by the project. Indirect costs must be listed under the applicant’s cost sharing contribution. Other Requirements Applicant organizations must be registered in the System for Award Management (SAM) prior to submitting an application, maintain SAM registration throughout the application and award process, and include a valid DUNS number in their application. Details on SAM registration and requesting a DUNS number can be found at the System for Award Management website at https://sam.gov. Please refer to the User Guides section and the Grants Registrations PDF. A complete application includes the Application for Federal Assistance (Standard Form 424), Assurances -- Non-Construction Programs (Standard Form 424B), a Project Narrative, Summary, Supplementary Materials, and Budget. Applications lacking these items will not be considered. Ineligible applications will not be reviewed.

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Mathematics & Physical Sciences

National Science Foundation - PD-19-9102

Economic development and human progress have led to a proliferation of manufactured chemicals and materials made from limited resources found in nature(i.e., minerals and metals,petroleum-based productsand natural gas). Long-term sustainability requires consideration of the availability of specific natural resources, energy, and water usage. NSF continues to support efforts that seek to improve the efficiency with which natural resources are used to meet human needs for products and services. Sustainability research encompasses the design, manufacture and use of efficient, effective, safe and more environmentally-benign products and processes; stimulates innovation across all sectors to design and discover new chemicals and materials, production processes, and product stewardship practices; and, increases performance and value while meeting the goals of protectingand enhancing human health and the environment. This program seeks to support basic research through core disciplinary programs aimed at improving the sustainability of resources for future generations while maintaining or improving current products in order to offer technologically-advanced, economically competitive, environmentally-benign and useful materials to a global society. In order to address these challenges, the program aims to identify opportunities for innovation in a wide range of contributing disciplines as well as integrative activities. This program encourages the development of new experimental and theoretical/modeling approaches that will aid in both reductionist and whole-systems approaches. This program welcomes proposals in any area of research supported through the participating divisions that address the topics outlined below. The selected topics are of particular interest to core disciplinary programs in the participating divisions and do not include all funding opportunities and priorities in the area or sustainability at NSF. Proposals are submitted to the relevant core Programs indicated below in the participating Divisions, and all questions regarding proposals should be addressed by the cognizant Program Officers to which submission is contemplated.Proposals should be submitted with the "CAS:" prefix in the title. The Division of Chemistry (CHE/MPS) welcomes proposals to its Disciplinary Research Programs, including Chemical Catalysis (CAT), Chemical Measurement and Imaging (CMI), Chemical Structure, Dynamics and Mechanisms-A (CSDM-A), Chemical Structure Dynamics and Mechanisms-B (CSDM-B), Chemical Synthesis (SYN), Chemical Theory, Models and Computational Methods (CTMC), Chemistry of Life Processes (CLP), Environmental Chemical Sciences (ECS), and Macromolecular, Supramolecular and Nanochemistry (MSN).All proposals must be onchemical aspects of sustainability. The design, preparation and reactivity studies associated with new catalysts and catalytic processes that employ earth-abundant and benign elements and raw materials; advanced catalytic methods for the reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia and water splitting are also invited; Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaison with Industry (GOALI) proposals, where such advances are connected directly to industrial considerations, are also encouraged. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of the two-way communication between the environment and living systems as well as between organisms situated in changing environments; design and test methods that could confer resilience and/or could foster adaptability of living systems subject to changing environments. Innovative measurement and imaging approaches that can improve the efficiency of manufacturing processes, including advances in separation science targeting reduced energy consumption or generation of less waste. Fundamental studies related to sustainable energy such as chromophores based on earth abundant elements, advanced electrolytes for battery, water splitting, and carbon dioxide conversions. Understanding the environmental chemical degradation of contaminants, including emerging contaminants. Transformative approaches to efficient and inexpensive synthesis of polymers or nanostructures using renewable feedstocks or earth abundant elements; and innovative research that enhances the understanding of efficient use and recycling of polymers and critical elements or the conversion of energy from renewable sources. The development of new synthetic methods using earth-abundant and inexpensive chemicals, fundamental studies that improve our understanding of rare earth elements; the conversion of non-petroleum-based resources into useful building blocks; and new environmentally-friendly chemical syntheses that improve on current practice by requiring less energy, fresh water, reagents, and/or organic solvents. Other CHE programs also welcome proposals on this general topic, as long as the proposals fit the scope of the program. All questions regarding proposals toCHE should be addressed to the cognizant Program Officers for the Program to which submission is contemplated (seeCHE Program webpages, https://www.nsf.gov/funding/programs.jsp?org=CHE). The Division of Materials Research (DMR/MPS) welcomes proposals to its Topical Materials Research Programs, including Biomaterials (BMAT), Ceramics (CER), Condensed Matter and Materials Theory (CMMT), Condensed Matter Physics (CMP), Electronic and Photonic Materials (EPM), Metals and Metallic Nanostructures (MMN), Polymers (POL), and Solid State and Materials Chemistry (SSMC). All proposals must be on materials aspects of sustainability and focused on fundamental materials-research approaches. CER, CMMT, EPM, MMN, and SSMC will consider proposals on all materials aspects of sustainability. BMAT encourages proposals that take advantage of synthetic biology or other innovative and sustainable approaches (e.g., renewable, recyclable, environmentally benign). CMP encourages proposals on replacing rare-earth elements in magnetic materials with more abundant and accessible elements; also proposals exploring materials alternatives to oxides for nuclear reactor fuel, aiming at improved stability and properties (e.g., thermal conductivity) and decreased environmental impact. POL welcomes proposals that address plastics waste accumulation through innovative materials approaches and environmentally benign polymeric materials having properties exceeding those of current commercial plastics. All proposals must be submitted through one of the active solicitations of the DMR Topical Materials Research Programs (currently NSF 17-580, 18-500, and 19-515) and must follow the deadlines, instructions, and limitations of these solicitations. Proposals that are not in accordance with these guidelines or that fall outside the scope of DMR and its Topical Materials Research Programs will be returned without review. All questions regarding proposals to DMR should be addressed to the cognizant Program Officers for the Program to which submission is contemplated (see DMR Program webpages, https://www.nsf.gov/funding/programs.jsp?org=DMR). The Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport Systems Division (CBET/ENG) has several core programs that review proposals on research topics related to sustainability, including Molecular Separations (MolS),Biosensing, Environmental Sustainability (EnvS), Biological and Environmental Interactions of Nanoscale Materials (BioNano), Combustion and Fire Systems (CFS), and Particulate and Multiphase Processes (PMP). Within these programs, as noted, the following topics are of particular interest: Understanding the fundamental combustion properties of sustainable aviation fuels under engine relevant conditions. (CFS) Fundamental studies leading to effective methods of processing multiphase fluid systems that minimize waste, avoid contamination, enhance purity, or lead to novel materials that benefit efficient energy utilization. (PMP) The development of innovative separation mechanisms, mass separating agents, or engineering processes that aim to substantially reduce energy and/or material consumption in the chemical process industries. (MolS) Fundamental mechanistic investigations for the development, sustainable production and use of nanomaterials, nanoparticles, nanodevices and nanosystems. (BioNano) Biosensing systems with inherent capabilities of artificial intelligence, machine learning, and decision making for applications in real time monitoring of environmental and living systems and in evaluating environmentally benign chemicals and materials. (Biosensing) Industrial Ecology: Topics of interest in Industrial Ecology include advancements in modeling such as life cycle assessment, materials flow analysis, input/output economic models, and novel metrics for measuring sustainable systems. Innovations in industrial ecology are encouraged. (EnvS) Green Engineering: Research is encouraged to advance the sustainability of manufacturing processes, green buildings, and infrastructure. Improvements in distribution and collection systems that will advance smart growth strategies and ameliorate effects of growth are supported. Innovations in management of storm water, recycling and reuse of drinking water, and other green engineering techniques to support sustainability may also be fruitful areas for research. (EnvS) Ecological Engineering: Topics should focus on the engineering aspects of restoring ecological function to natural systems. Engineering research in the enhancement of natural capital to foster sustainable development is encouraged. (EnvS) Earth Systems Engineering: Earth systems engineering considers aspects of large scale engineering research that involve mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions, adaptation to climate change, and other global scale concerns. (EnvS) All questions regarding proposals toCBET should be addressed to the cognizant Program Officers for the participating Program to which submission is contemplated (seeCBET Program webpages, https://www.nsf.gov/funding/programs.jsp?org=CBET). For the Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation (CMMI/ENG), proposals addressing sustainable materials processing are welcome. Of interest are manufacturing processes with reduced use of toxic components, such as solvents, carbon emissions, and pollutants; processes under ambient conditions, as opposed to extreme temperatures, pressures or other harsh conditions; and increased conservation of natural resources, such as water, raw material, and energy. Proposals to CMMI must be submitted to the Advanced Manufacturing (AM) Program and align with the scope of the program. All questions regarding proposals toCMMI should be addressed to the cognizant Program Officers for the participating Program to which submission is contemplated (seeCMMI Program webpages, https://www.nsf.gov/funding/programs.jsp?org=CMMI). The Division of Earth Sciences (EAR/GEO) welcomes fundamental and transformational geosciences projects addressing the distribution of Critical Minerals and Materials in the Earth. The following programs in the division support research on this topic: Petrology and Geochemistry (CH), Geobiology and Low-Temperature Geochemistry (GG), and Frontier Research in Earth Sciences (FRES). Topics of particular interest include fundamental studies of the geochemistry of Critical Earth Minerals and Materials (CMM), such as: Identifying new sources of critical minerals on the Earth’s surface; Constraining their pathways in the natural environment involving concentration by Earth and geobiological processes; and Developing methods for sustainable exploration of these CMMs. Studies can be based on laboratory, field, or modeling efforts, and should have a strong emphasis on training the next generation of geoscientists and educating the public on the importance of CMM. Proposals must be submitted through one of the active solicitations of the three programs and must follow the deadlines and guidelines of these solicitations. All questions regarding proposals toEAR should be addressed to the cognizant Program Officers for the participating Program to which submission is contemplated (seeEAR Program webpages, https://www.nsf.gov/funding/programs.jsp?org=EAR).

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-578

The Physics Frontiers Centers (PFC) program supports university-based centers and institutes where the collective efforts of a larger group of individuals can enable transformational advances in the most promising research areas. The program is designed to foster major breakthroughs at the intellectual frontiers of physics by providing needed resources such as combinations of talents, skills, disciplines, and/or specialized infrastructure, not usually available to individual investigators or small groups, in an environment in which the collective efforts of the larger group can be shown to be seminal to promoting significant progress in the science and the education of students.Activities supported through the program are in all sub-fields of physics within the purview of the Division of Physics: atomic, molecular, optical, plasma, elementary particle, nuclear, particle astro-, gravitational, and biological physics. Interdisciplinary projects at the interface between these physics areas and other disciplines and physics sub-fields may also be considered, although the bulk of the effort must fall within one of those areas within the purview of the Division of Physics. The successful PFC activity will demonstrate: (1) the potential for a profound advance in physics; (2) creative, substantive activities aimed at enhancing education, diversity, and public outreach; (3) potential for broader impacts, e.g., impacts on other field(s) and benefits to society; (4) a synergy or value-added rationale that justifies a center- or institute-like approach.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-577

This solicitation applies to nine CHE Disciplinary Chemistry Research Programs: Chemical Catalysis (CAT); Chemical Measurement and Imaging (CMI); Chemical Structure, Dynamics and Mechanisms-A (CSDM-A); Chemical Structure Dynamics and Mechanisms-B (CSDM-B); Chemical Synthesis (SYN); Chemical Theory, Models and Computational Methods (CTMC); Chemistry of Life Processes (CLP); Environmental Chemical Sciences (ECS); and Macromolecular, Supramolecular and Nanochemistry (MSN). All proposals submitted to these nine CHE Disciplinary Research Programs (other than the following exceptions) must be submitted through this solicitation, otherwise they will be returned without review. Exceptions: Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) proposals should be submitted through the CAREER solicitation (https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=503214) by the CAREER deadline date specified. Facilitating Research at Primarily Undergraduate Institutions: Research in Undergraduate Institutions (RUI) and Research Opportunity Awards (ROA) proposals should be submitted through the RUI/ROA solicitation (https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5518) during the window for the appropriateCHE Disciplinary Research Program. In addition to the requirements of the RUI program, proposals should follow the guidance in this solicitation. Proposals for Early-concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGER), Grants for Rapid Response Research (RAPID), Research Advanced by Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering (RAISE), and conferences can be submitted anytime after consultation with the cognizant NSF Program Officer. Supplemental funding requeststo existing grantscan be submitted anytime after consultation with the cognizant NSF Program Officer.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 18-575

The Astronomy and Astrophysics Research Grants (AAG) Program is an inclusive and flexible funding opportunity to support research in the astronomical sciences. The Program provides individual investigator and collaborative research grants for observational, theoretical, laboratory, and archival data studies in astronomy and astrophysics. The Program also considers proposals for projects and tools that enable or enhance astronomical research. Proposals may span multiple disciplines and/or areas of study and may utilize multiple techniques.

Agency Documentation

[ Ag | A&H | Bio | BizTech | CISE | Def | Ed | Energy | Eng | Geo | Lib | MPS | SS | Other ]

Social Sciences

Russell Sage Foundation

The Russell Sage Foundation is an operating foundation dedicated to programs of social science research.

Core Programs:
Behavioral Economics = BE | Future of Work = FOW | Race, Ethnicity and Immigration = REI | Social, Political and Economic Inequality = SPEI

Special Initiatives:
Computational Social Science = CSS | Decision Making and Human Behavior in Context = DM | Immigration & Immigrant Integration = III | Social, Economic and Political Effects of the ACA = ACA
SPEI / BE / REI / DM / III / ACA (LOI deadline: May 23, 2019*; Proposal: August 15, 2019*)
FOW / BE / DM / CSS / III (LOI deadline: August 21, 2019; Proposal: November 21, 2019*)
SPEI / FOW / BE / DM (LOI deadline: November 26, 2019*; Proposal : March 12, 2020*)
* ALL applications (LOIs & Proposals) are due by 2pm ET/11am PT

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - PD-11-8031

Organizations -- private and public, established and entrepreneurial, designed and emergent, formal and informal, profit and nonprofit -- are critical to the well-being of nations and their citizens. They are of crucial importance for producing goods and services, creating value, providing jobs, and achieving social goals. The Science of Organizations (SoO) program funds basic research that yields a scientific evidence base for improving the design and emergence, development and deployment, and management and ultimate effectiveness of organizations of all kinds. SoO funds research that advances our fundamental understanding of how organizations develop, form and operate. Successful SoO research proposals use scientific methods to develop and refine theories, to empirically test theories and frameworks, and to develop new measures and methods. Funded research is aimed at yielding generalizable insights that are of value to the business practitioner, policy-maker and research communities. SoO welcomes any and all rigorous, scientific approaches that illuminate aspects of organizations as systems of coordination, management and governance. In considering whether a particular project might be a candidate for consideration by SoO, please note: Intellectual perspectives may involve (but are not limited to) organizational theory, behavior, sociology or economics, business policy and strategy, communication sciences, entrepreneurship, human resource management, information sciences, managerial and organizational cognition, operations management, public administration, social or industrial psychology, and technology and innovation management. Phenomena studied may include (but are not limited to) structures, routines, effectiveness, competitiveness, innovation, dynamics, change and evolution.Levels of analysis may include (but are not limited to) organizational, cross-organizational collaborations or relationships, and institutional and can address individuals, groups or teams.Research methods may be qualitative and quantitative and may include (but are not limited to) archival analyses, surveys, simulation studies, experiments, comparative case studies, and network analyses. Consistent with NSF merit review criteria, each SoO proposal should discuss both the intellectual merit and the potential broader impacts of the proposed research. SoO values basic research that has the potential to provide broader societal benefits. However, the majority of space in any proposal will need to be dedicated to the explication of theory, methods, and specific contribution to the evidence base about organizational effectiveness. Projects that aim to implement and subsequently evaluate particular organizational training, effectiveness or change programs, rather than to advance fundamental, generalizable knowledge, are not appropriate for SoO. Researchers who seek to conduct SoO-appropriate research in an industrial site and/or via an industry-university collaboration are invited to also look at the Grant Opportunities for Academic Liaisons with Industry (GOALI) program web site.

Agency Documentation

[ Ag | A&H | Bio | BizTech | CISE | Def | Ed | Energy | Eng | Geo | Lib | MPS | SS | Other ]

Other/Interdisciplinary

National Science Foundation - 19-598

The confluence of transistor scaling, increases in the number of architecture designs per process generation, the slowing of clock frequency growth, and recent success in research exploiting thread-level parallelism (TLP) and data-level parallelism (DLP) all point to an increasing opportunity for innovative microarchitecture techniques and methodologies in delivering performance growth in the future. The NSF/Intel Partnership on Foundational Microarchitecture Research will support transformative microarchitecture research targeting improvements in instructions per cycle (IPC). This solicitation seeks microarchitecture technique innovations beyond simplistic, incremental scaling of existing microarchitectural structures. Specifically, FoMR seeks to advance research that has the following characteristics: (1) high IPC techniques ranging from microarchitecture to code generation; (2) “microarchitecture turbo” techniques that marshal chip resources and system memory bandwidth to accelerate sequential or single-threaded programs; and (3) techniques to support efficient compiler code generation. Advances in these areas promise to provide significant performance improvements that continue the trends characterized by Moore’s Law.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-596

Plasma Physics is a study of matter and physical systems whose intrinsic properties are governed by collective interactions of large ensembles of free charged particles. 99.9% of the visible Universe is thought to consist of plasmas. The underlying physics of the collective behavior in plasmas has applications to space physics and astrophysics, materials science, applied mathematics, fusion science, accelerator science, and many branches of engineering. The National Science Foundation (NSF), with participation of the Directorates for Engineering, Geosciences, and Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and the Department of Energy, Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences are continuing the joint Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering begun in FY1997 and renewed several times since. As stated in the original solicitation (NSF 97-39), which is superseded by the present solicitation, the goal of the Partnership is to enhance basic plasma science research and education in this broad, multidisciplinary field by coordinating efforts and combining resources of the two agencies. The current solicitation also encourages submission of proposals to perform basic plasma experiments at NSF and/or DOE supported user facilities, including facilities located at DOE national laboratories, designed to serve the needs of the broader plasma science and engineering community.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-348

Through this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), the National Cancer Institute (NCI) announces its interest in supporting meritorious research projects in three distinct domains related to cancer communication: 1) the utility and application of new cancer communication surveillance approaches; 2) the development and testing of rapid cancer communication interventions using innovative methods and designs; and 3) the development and testing of multilevel cancer communication models emphasizing bidirectional influence between levels. For such projects, applicants should apply communication science approaches to the investigation of behavioral targets and health outcomes related to cancer prevention and control. Applications should utilize one or more innovative communication research methodologies.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-345

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) announces the availability of support for collaborative research by multi-disciplinary teams which is of high priority to NIDA and leads to synergistic outcomes based on the synthesis of multiple research approaches. The NIDA Program Projects funding opportunity will support research in which the funding of three or more highly meritorious projects as a group enriches both the component projects and the overall program to offer significant scientific advantages over supporting the same projects as individual research grants (i.e., synergy). For the duration of the award, each Program must consist of a minimum of three research projects focused on issues critical to advance the mission and goals of NIDA.

Agency Documentation

Institute of Museum and Library Services - NLG-M-FY20

The goals of National Leadership Grants (NLG) for Museums are to support projects that address critical needs of the museum field and that have the potential to advance practice in the profession so that museums can strengthen services for the American public.

Agency Documentation

Institute of Museum and Library Services - IGSM-FY20

Inspire! Grants for Small Museums is a special initiative of the Museums for America Program. It is designed to help small museums implement projects that address priorities identified in their strategic plans. IMLS invites applications that focus on providing rich learning experiences for individuals of all ages, backgrounds, and circumstances; supporting partnerships aimed at assessing and addressing the needs of their communities; strengthening the role of museums as trusted stewards of the collections in their care; and/or expanding access to collections and associated resources.

Agency Documentation

Institute of Museum and Library Services - MFA-FY20

The goal of the Museums for America (MFA) grant program is to support projects that strengthen the ability of an individual museum to serve its public.

Agency Documentation

The goal of this FOA is to support short courses geared to behavioral and social scientists who have existing expertise in aging research and can make research contributions in Alzheimers disease and Alzheimer's disease-related dementias (AD/ADRD) with additional knowledge about the diseaseand related research resources. Fields of behavioral and social science research relevant for this FOA are health economics, labor economics, health services research, healthcare policy, public policy, demography, sociology, social epidemiology, psychology, and social neuroscience. Priority areas of focus include, but are not limited to, the following: dementia care; dementia caregiver research; cognitive and dementia epidemiology; behavioral and social pathways of AD/ADRD; role of social, contextual, environmental, and institutional factors in AD/ADRD; early psychological changes preceding AD/ADRD onset; prevention of AD/ADRD; disparities in AD/ADRD or dementia-related outcomes; and research resources and methods for studying the determinants and impact of AD/ADRD.

Agency Documentation

National Institute of Food and Agriculture - USDA-NIFA-SCRI-006810

The purpose of the SCRI program is to address the critical needs of the specialty crop industry by awarding grants to support research and extension that address key challenges of national, regional, and multi-state importance in sustaining all components of food and agriculture, including conventional and organic food production systems. Projects must address at least one of five focus areas:Research in plant breeding, genetics, genomics, and other methods to improve crop characteristicsEfforts to identify and address threats from pests and diseases, including threats to specialty crop pollinatorsEfforts to improve production efficiency, handling and processing, productivity, and profitability over the long term (including specialty crop policy and marketing)New innovations and technology, including improved mechanization and technologies that delay or inhibit ripeningMethods to prevent, detect, monitor, control, and respond to potential food safety hazards in the production efficiency,handling and processing of specialty crops.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-595

The Antarctic Sciences Section (ANT) of the Office of Polar Programs (OPP) supports cutting-edge research that (1) expands fundamental knowledge of the Antarctic and the natural laboratory it represents across a range of disciplines, (2) improves understanding of interactions between the Antarctic and Southern Ocean region and Earth system, and (3) utilizes the unique characteristics of the Antarctic continent as an observing platform. The U.S. Antarctic Program (USAP) supports scientific research in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean with logistics provided by OPP’s Antarctic Infrastructure and Logistics Section (AIL). Antarctic fieldwork is supported only for research that must be performed, or is best performed, in Antarctica. ANT encourages research, using existing samples, data, and models, that does not require fieldwork. ANT also encourages research that crosses and combines, disciplinary perspectives and approaches.

Agency Documentation

Environmental Protection Agency - EPA-HQ-OPP-2019-004

The Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) is solicitingapplications from eligible parties for an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)cooperative agreement to provide financial assistance to an eligibleorganization for a pesticide safety program, including training and education,aimed at reducing exposure to pesticides for agricultural workers, theirfamilies and the agricultural community. The grantee will conduct a nationalprogram to educate farmworkers about how to reduce risks from pesticides. Aspart of this program, the grantee will also train pesticide safety educatorswho will work with farmworker service organizations, growers and other membersof the agricultural community in key rural, agricultural areas with highpesticide use and large numbers of farmworkers to conduct interactive pesticidesafety programs for agricultural workers and their families. The grantee mayutilize existing EPA approved worker and children protection pesticide safetytraining and education materials, may develop new and/or improved materials andcollaborate with other EPA grantees to address pesticide safety issues forfarmworkers and farmworker children. All training materials should be targetedat the low literacy, predominately non-English speaking agricultural workerpopulation. EPA expects to provide an estimated $500,000 annually, depending onthe Agency’s budget, for a total of up to $2,500,000 for five years (2020through 2025).

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - RFA-AG-20-035

This FOA will use the NIH Resource-Related Research Project (R24) mechanism to facilitate the development of research networks to advance research on the basic biology of aging in health disparities. The infrastructure-building aspect of this FOA will be to establish collaborations for subsequent research on the biology of aging underlying health disparities. The intention is to provide a platform for discovery and pilot projects to establish feasibility of novel approaches to be used by these collaborations. For this FOA, the key human population feature of health disparities is accelerated aging.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-591

This program seeks to accelerate fundamental, broad-based research on wireless-specific machine learning (ML) techniques, towards a new wireless system and architecture design, which can dynamically access shared spectrum, efficiently operate with limited radio and network resources, and scale to address the diverse and stringent quality-of-service requirements of future wireless applications. In parallel, this program also targets research on reliable distributed ML by addressing the challenge of computation over wireless edge networks to enable ML for wireless and future applications. Model-based approaches for designing the wireless network stack have proven quite efficient in delivering the networks in wide use today; research enabled by this program is expected to identify realistic problems that can be best solved by ML and to address fundamental questions about expected improvements from using ML over model-based methods. Proposals may address one or more Research Vectors (RVs): ML for Wireless Networks; ML for Spectrum Management; and Distributed ML over Wireless Edge Networks. It is anticipated that 10 to 15 awards will be made, with an award size of $300,000-$1,500,000, for periods of up to 3 years. The budget should be commensurate with the complexity of the proposed research. Projects will be funded across this range.

Agency Documentation

Impact: The FY19 PH/TBIRP PSAAD IIFRA is intended to support research focused on: (1) the development or adaptation of prevention efforts to reduce the occurrence of sexual assault and/or harassment and/or (2) understanding the diagnosis, assessment, and screening of adjustment disorders as a consequence of sexual assault and/or stressors that precipitate adjustment disorders. The application must clearly demonstrate the project’s potential immediate and long-range outcome(s) with the potential to yield highly impactful data that are of clear scientific merit and could lead to critical discoveries and/or major advancements and not be limited to a clinical setting such as a behavioral health clinic. The rationale for a research idea may be derived from population-based studies, a clinician’s first-hand knowledge of patients, or anecdotal data. Applications must include relevant data that support the rationale for the proposed study. The data may be unpublished or from published literature.

Department of Commerce - NOAA-NOS-OCM-2020-2006074

The purpose of this notice is to solicit grant proposals for the National Estuarine Research Reserve System’s Margaret A. Davidson Graduate Fellowship (Davidson Fellowship) from master’s and doctoral students actively enrolled in a graduate program at an accredited university. The National Estuarine Research Reserve System is a program of the Office for Coastal Management which has an interest in balancing the needs of the natural environment and coastal economies and is responsible for implementing the Coastal Zone Management Act. The goals of the Davidson Fellowship are to build the next generation of leaders in estuarine science and coastal management by affording qualified graduate students the opportunity to conduct collaborative science within the National Estuarine Research Reserve System; partake in professional development opportunities; and receive mentoring to support professional growth. All Davidson Fellowship projects must be conducted in a research reserve and should be designed to contribute to one of the reserve’s priority management areas, and thus enhance the scientific understanding of the natural or social science aspects of the research subject matter. One fellow will be selected for each of the 29 reserves for a two-year duration. Mentoring and professional development activities will be provided to build knowledge and skills needed to successfully contribute to the workforce responsible for the coast. These opportunities are also designed to create a strong network among the fellows during their tenure and into the early portion of their careers. Typically, awards will be made to the fellow's graduate institution through the use of a cooperative agreement. Funds are expected to be available on a competitive basis to qualified graduate students. To be eligible, applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of U.S. states or territories, and admitted to or enrolled full-time in a master's or doctoral program at a U.S. accredited university. Minority students are encouraged to apply. Additional information about the fellowship may be found at: https://coast.noaa.gov/nerrs/research/davidson-fellowship.html

National Science Foundation - 19-588

The Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research is designed to fulfill the mandate of the National Science Foundation (NSF) to promote scientific progress nationwide. Through this program, NSF establishes partnerships with government, higher education, and industry that are designed to effect sustainable improvements in a jurisdiction's research infrastructure, Research and Development (R&D) capacity, and hence, its R&D competitiveness. Eligibility to participate in the EPSCoR Workshop Opportunities program is described according to the Outreach Eligibility Map (see eligibility map). EPSCoR welcomes proposals for workshops from institutions within EPSCoR-eligible jurisdictions. These workshops will focus on innovative ways to address multi-jurisdictional efforts on themes of regional to national importance with relevance to EPSCoR's goals and NSF's mission.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-586

NSF seeks proposals to establish an adaptive and responsive research network that supports investigations of the Earth’s Critical Zone. This network will consist of two components that will work together to advance knowledge, education, and outreach in this convergent science:1) Thematic Clusters of fixed or temporary locations will conduct basic research on significant, overarching scientific questions concerning the structure, function, and processes of the Critical Zone. These U.S.-based Clusters could include existing observatories engaged in collecting environmental data, other monitoring locations that have been in operation for extended periods of time, and new sites that will support the scientific goals of the Cluster;2) A Coordinating Hub that will oversee the compatibility and archiving of the data resulting from the Thematic Clusters, coordinate outreach and community-building activities, support the use of network facilities by outside researchers, and plan for infrastructure needs of the network. This solicitation invites proposals for either of the two components: 1) Thematic Clusteror 2) Coordinating Hub. The Thematic Clusters will carry out interdisciplinary research on scientific questions and manage part of the network infrastructure; the Coordinating Hub will serve as the national center for the network. The infrastructure of thenetwork will be accessible to other research teams pursuing research in the Critical Zone.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - PD-19-095Y

With the NSF Convergence Accelerator, NSF's goals are: (i) to pilot a new NSF capability to accelerate use-inspired convergence research in areas of national importance, and (ii) to initiate convergence team-building capacity around exploratory, potentially high-risk proposals in specific convergence topics (tracks). The NSF Convergence Accelerator supports use-inspired, goal-oriented, basic research, encouraging rapid advances through partnerships that include multiple stakeholders (e.g., industry, academic, not-for-profits, government entities, and others). The NSF Convergence Accelerator brings teams together in a cohort that are all focused on a common research goal of national importance, but which may be pursuing many different approaches. As a funder of research and education across all fields of science and engineering and with relationships with universities and funding agencies around the world, NSF is uniquely positioned to pilot this approach to accelerate discovery and innovation. Teams supported by the NSF Convergence Accelerator will focus on grand challenges that require a convergence approach. The teams are multidisciplinary and leverage partnerships; tracks within the NSF Convergence Accelerator relate to a grand challenge problem and have a high probability of resulting in deliverables that will benefit society within a fixed term. The NSF Convergence Accelerator is modeled on acceleration and innovation activities from the most forward-looking companies and universities. Specific funding opportunities will be announced through Dear Colleague Letters, program announcements, and/or solicitations. For more information see the NSF Convergence Accelerator website: https://www.nsf.gov/od/oia/convergence-accelerator/index.jsp

Agency Documentation

Air Force Office of Scientific Research - FOA-AFRL-AFOSR-2019-0004

The Department of Defense (DOD) plans to award fiscal year 2019 (FY19) appropriations for a future funding opportunity announcement for the Defense Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (DEPSCoR) program. Approximately $3.6 million in total funding will be made available for this program to fund approximately six (6) awards up to $600,000 (total cost) each. Each award will be funded up to $200,000 (total cost) per year for three (3) years in the form of a grant. Subjected to funding availability. The program objectives for DEPSCoR are described in the program statue (Pub. L. 115–91, div. A, title II, §219[e][3], Dec. 12, 2017, 131 Stat. 1331). The website https://discover.dtic.mil/products-services/ is a non-comprehensive repository of government-funded scientific, technical, and engineering information for the Department. Researchers new to DoD (Applicant) are encouraged to visit the site as a starting point for identifying past and present DoD-funded researchers.

National Institute of Standards and Technology - 2019-NIST-MSE-01

NIST is soliciting applications for financial assistance for Fiscal Year 2019 (FY19) within the following NIST grant programs: the Associate Director for Innovation and Industry Services (ADIIS); the Associate Director for Laboratory Programs (ADLP); the Communications Technology Laboratory (CTL); the Engineering Laboratory (EL); Fire Research (FR); the Information Technology Laboratory (ITL); the International and Academic Affairs Office (IAAO); the Material Measurement Laboratory (MML); the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR); the Physical Measurement Laboratory (PML); the Special Programs Office (SPO); and the Standards Coordination Office (SCO). Detailed Program Descriptions, Funding Availability, and Evaluation Criteria for each respective subtopic can be found in the full announcement. This funding opportunity will result in the award of grants or cooperative agreements. A grant or cooperative agreement is not the correct funding vehicle if the principal purpose is to provide products or services for the direct benefit or use of the federal government.

DARPA - Biological Technologies Office - HR001119S0048

This announcement seeks revolutionary research ideas for topics not being addressed by ongoing BTO programs or other published solicitations.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-576

The Centers for Chemical Innovation (CCI) Program supportsresearch centersfocused on major, long-term fundamental chemical researchchallenges.CCIs that addressthese challenges will produce transformative research, lead to innovation, and attract broad scientific and public interest. CCIs are agile structures that can respond rapidly to emerging opportunities through enhanced collaborations. CCIs integrate research, innovation, education, broadening participation, andinformal science communication. The CCI Program is a two-phase program. Both phases are described in this solicitation. Phase I CCIs receive significant resources to develop the science, management and broader impacts of a major research center before requesting Phase II funding. Satisfactory progress in Phase I is required for Phase II applications; Phase I proposals funded in FY 2020 will seek Phase II funding in FY 2023. The FY 2020 Phase I CCI competition is open to projects in all fields supported by the Division of Chemistry, and must have scientific focus and the potential for transformative impact in chemistry.NSF Chemistry particularly encourages fundamental chemistry projects related to one or more of NSF's 10 Big Ideas. The FY 2020 Phase II CCI competition is open to projects funded as Phase I awards in FY 2017 and the renewal of the Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-253

This initiative will support projects that focus solely on development of technologies with the potential to enable acquisition of basic biomedical knowledge. Projects should be justified in terms of technical innovation, and utility for future biomedical impact. The products of this research will be functioning prototype instruments, methods, synthetic approaches, biological products, etc., characterized adequately to be ready for first application to the type of biomedical research questions that provide the rationale for their development, but application of the proposed technology to specific biomedical questions is considered beyond the scope of the program, should not be included, and would not be funded. Proof of principle for the technology will have already been shown, but there will still be significant fundamental technical challenges. Applications should include preliminary data. Projects that have significant remaining risk but are supported by early feasibility studies might be appropriate for a three year R01 proposal with reduced budget to better manage risk and investment. Projects that are well supported by feasibility studies and propose to develop fully functional prototypes might require higher budgets and a four year duration (five years for early stage investigators). Projects that primarily focus on optimization, hardening, or obvious extrapolations of established technology might be less competitive.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-19-254

This initiative will support exploratory research leading to the development of innovative technologies for biomedical research. The program will recognize and reward high risk approaches with potential for significant impact. Projects should entail a high degree of risk or novelty, which will be offset by a correspondingly high potential impact. However, the possible impact is likely to be far off. Application of the proposed technology to specific biomedical questions is considered beyond the scope of the program, should not be included, and would not be funded. The goal of this FOA is to support proof of concept studies for feasibility and exploratory technology development. Feasibility must not have already been established in the literature or with preliminary data. Published data can be used to establish the current state of the art but cannot forecast or predict project outcomes. Preliminary data for any purpose might appear to forecast the likelihood of success. Therefore, no unpublished data is allowed. While unpublished data are not permitted, references and data from widely available preprints that have a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) are acceptable.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-572

In today’s increasingly networked, distributed, and asynchronous world, cybersecurity involves hardware, software, networks, data, people, and integration with the physical world. Society’s overwhelming reliance on this complex cyberspace, however, has exposed its fragility and vulnerabilities that defy existing cyber-defense measures; corporations, agencies, national infrastructure and individuals continue to suffer cyber-attacks. Achieving a truly secure cyberspace requires addressing both challenging scientific and engineering problems involving many components of a system, and vulnerabilities that stem from human behaviors and choices. Examining the fundamentals of security and privacy as a multidisciplinary subject can lead to fundamentally new ways to design, build and operate cyber systems, protect existing infrastructure, and motivate and educate individuals about cybersecurity. The Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC) program welcomes proposals that address cybersecurity and privacy, and draw on expertise in one or more of these areas: computing, communication and information sciences; engineering; economics; education; mathematics; statistics; and social and behavioral sciences. Proposals that advance the field of cybersecurity and privacy within a single discipline or interdisciplinary efforts that span multiple disciplines are both encouraged. Please see SaTC program solicitation for more details. Through this solicitation—under the SaTC umbrella—NSF specifically seeks ambitious and potentially transformative center-scale projects in the area of security and privacy that (1) catalyze far-reaching research explorations motivated by deep scientific questions or hard problems and/or by compelling applications and novel technologies that promise significant scientific and/or societal benefits, and (2) stimulate significant research and education outcomes that, through effective knowledge transfer mechanisms, promise scientific, economic and/or other societal benefits. The goal of the SaTC Frontiers program is to advance the frontiers of cybersecurity and privacy, and the areas listed in the SaTC program solicitation are meant to be illustrative but not exhaustive. The SaTC Frontiers program will support proposals from $5,000,000 to $10,000,000 in total budget, with durations of up to five years.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-563

Understanding how behavior emerges from the dynamic patterns of electrical and chemical activity of brain circuits is universally recognized as one of the great, unsolved mysteries of science. Advances in recent decades have elucidated how individual elements of the nervous system and brain relate to specific behaviors and cognitive processes. However, there remains much to discover to attain a comprehensive understanding of how the healthy brain functions, specifically, the general principles underlying how cognition and behavior relate to the brain’s structural organization and dynamic activities, how the brain interacts with its environment, and how brains maintain their functionality over time. Achieving an understanding of brain structure and function that spans levels of organization, spatial and temporal scales, and the diversity of species requires an international,transdisciplinary collaborative effort to not only integrate discipline-specific ideas andapproaches but also extend them to stimulate new discoveries, and innovativeconcepts, theories, and methodologies. The objective of this phase of the NeuroNex Program is the establishment of distributed, international research networks that build on existing globalinvestments in neurotechnologiesto address overarching questions in neuroscience. The creation of such global research networks of excellence will foster international cooperation by seeding close interactions between a wide array of organizations across the world, as well as creating links and articulating alliances between multiple recently launched international brain projects. The potential transformative advances in neuroscience stemming from this activity will have profound scientific and societal impacts. The goal of this solicitation is to support collaborative networks (approximately 15 to 20 investigators in each network) comprised of international teams of disciplinarily diverse experimentalists, theorists, and research resource (including technology and cyberinfrastructure) developersworking on a common foundational question in neuroscience. It is anticipated that these internationalnetworks will enable experimentation, analysis, and discovery in neuroscience at scales much larger than currently possible. This interdisciplinary, internationalprogram is one element of NSF’s broader effort directed at Understanding the Brain, a multi-year activity that includes NSF’s participation in the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative (http://www.nsf.gov/brain/) and the phased approach to develop a research infrastructure for neuroscience as outlined in the Dear Colleague Letter NSF16-047. The need for a program that helps neuroscientists collect, standardize, manage, and analyze the large amounts of data that result from research attempting to understand how the brain functions has been recognized by stakeholders in the scientific community and by the U.S. Congress in the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act (AICA) of 2017. The NSF and international partner agenciesenvision a connected portfolio of transformative, integrative projects that leverage existing globalinvestments in neurotechnologiesand create synergistic links across domestic and international investigators and communities, yielding novel ways of tackling the challenges of understanding the brain in action and in context.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 19-528

The CNH2 Program supports research projects that advance basic scientific understanding of integrated socio-environmental systems and the complex interactions (dynamics, processes, and feedbacks) within and among the environmental (biological, physical and chemical) and human ("socio") (economic, social, political, or behavioral) components of such a system. The program seeks proposals that emphasize the truly integrated nature of a socio-environmental system versus two discrete systems (a natural one and a human one) that are coupled.CNH2 projects must explore a connected and integrated socio-environmental system that includes explicit analysis of the processes and dynamics between the environmental and human components of the system. PIs are encouraged to develop proposals that push conceptual boundaries and build new theoretical framings of the understanding of socio-environmental systems.Additionally, we encourage the exploration of multi-scalar dynamics, processes and feedbacks between and within the socio-environmental system.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - NSF 18-526

The primary driver for RII Track-4 investments is the desire to increase the competitiveness of EPSCoR-eligible institutions by catalyzing and strengthening the research programs of their talented non-tenured faculty. Over the long term, RII Track-4 investments are expected to result in sustained improvements in the individual research competitiveness of its awardees, and to stimulate broader improvements to the research capacity of the awardees’ institutions and jurisdictions. Proposals must demonstrate in a compelling way that each of these goals will be met.

RII Track-4 awards will provide support for Principal Investigators (PIs) to spend extended periods of time at premier research facilities within the United States and its territories (the “host site”). Up to six total months of salary support will be provided to the PI, corresponding to the time spent on her/his fellowship visit(s). In addition, each award will provide support for the PI to travel to the host site, including both transportation and living expenses for the duration of the fellowship visit. Up to six total months of salary support and travel expenses may also be requested for one additional trainee-level researcher – typically a graduate student or postdoctoral member of the PI’s group – to work with the PI to complete the planned activities at the host site. A small amount of additional support will be allowed to cover other travel and direct costs that are specifically associated with the fellowship project (e.g., purchasing supplies, shipping equipment, publication costs, etc.).

The most direct benefit of the RII Track-4 fellowship is expected to be to the PI’s individual research career trajectory. However, consistent with its programmatic focus on jurisdictional research capacity, NSF EPSCoR expects successful fellowships to also yield secondary benefits to the PI’s home institution and jurisdiction. At minimum, improving a PI’s individual research capacity will implicitly raise her/his institution’s overall capacity. However, it is expected that successful fellowships will include more proactive efforts to leverage the fellowship experience to achieve increased institutional or jurisdictional benefits. PIs are encouraged to present creative approaches for achieving this desired outcome within the overall constraints of the RII Track-4 fellowship mechanism.

Agency Documentation

Centers for Disease Control - NCIPC - CDC-RFA-CE19-1905

Violence is a major public health problem. Over 64,000 people died violently in the U.S. in 2016. These violent deaths included 44,965 suicides and 19,911 homicides. Violent deaths have been estimated to cost nearly $214 billion in medical care and lost productivity. Violence is preventable. Interventions, strategies, and policies are increasingly available that stop violence before it happens. Preventing violence is a critical public health goal because violence inflicts a substantial toll on individuals, families, and communities throughout the US. In order to prevent violence, we must first know the facts about violent deaths. This NOFO builds on previous and current work within the Division of Violence Prevention (DVP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to conduct surveillance of violence and to prevent violence. In 2002, CDC began implementing the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS, OMB No. 0920-0607). NVDRS is a state-based surveillance system that uses CDC guidelines and a CDC web-based data entry system to link data from Death Certificate (DC), Coroner/Medical Examiner (CME) reports including toxicology, and Law Enforcement (LE) reports to assist each participating state, territory, or district in designing and implementing tailored prevention and intervention efforts (See http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/nvdrs/index.html). As a state-based system, successful applicants collect and analyze data for their target area while CDC provides guidance to ensure the data are collected in a standardized manner and supplies access to a web-based data entry system. All successful applicants share their de-identified data with CDC. CDC combines successful applicant data into a multi-state database that informs national stakeholders. NVDRS summary data from 2003 to 2015 are available at: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/nvdrs.html.

National Institutes of Health - PAR-18-929

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages research project grant (R01) applications to leverage large-scale, real-world data from electronic health records (EHRs) from a variety of systems (e.g., the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services administrative claims, as well as public or private health care systems and networks) to understand risk, onset, course, and impact of treatments and services for mental and neurological disorders and to identify promising new mental health and neurological disorders research. There is particular interest in leveraging EHRs and administrative data to 1) understand and improve the treatment of post traumatic psychopathology, including posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and risk for suicide; and 2) characterize post-trauma multi-symptom recovery trajectory patterns of TBI, that may include post traumatic stress disorder, depression, cognitive impairment, pain, substance abuse disorder and risk for suicide. NIMH also invites innovative approaches to use EHR and administrative data to understand risk, onset, course, and impact of treatments and services for mental disorders more broadly.

Agency Documentation

Institute of Museum and Library Services - NLG-LIBRARIES-FY19

National Leadership Grants for Libraries (NLG-L) support projects that enhance the quality of library and archives services nationwide by advancing theory and practice.

Agency Documentation

National Institutes of Health - PAR-18-727

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to promote research on food specific molecular signatures and biomarkers of dietary consumption and to promote collaborative interactions among NIH and USDA supported nutrition researchers.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 18-532

Cultivating Cultures for Ethical STEM (CCE STEM)funds research projects that identify (1) factors that are effective in the formation of ethical STEM researchers and (2) approaches to developing those factors in all the fields of science and engineering that NSF supports. CCE STEM solicits proposals for research that explores the following: ‘What constitutesresponsible conduct for research (RCR), and which cultural and institutional contexts promote ethical STEM research and practice and why?' Factors one might consider include: honor codes, professional ethics codes and licensing requirements, an ethic of service and/or service learning, life-long learning requirements, curriculaor memberships in organizations (e.g.Engineers without Borders)that stress responsible conduct for research, institutions that serve under-represented groups, institutions where academic and research integrity are cultivated at multiple levels, institutions thatcultivate ethics across the curriculum, or programs that promote group work, or do not grade. Do certain labs have a ‘culture of academic integrity'? What practices contribute to the establishment and maintenance of ethical cultures and how can these practices be transferred, extended to, and integrated into other research and learning settings? Successful proposalstypicallyhavea comparative dimension, either between or within institutional settings that differ along these or among other factors, and they specify plans for developing interventions that promote the effectiveness of identified factors. CCE STEM research projects will use basic research to produce knowledge about what constitutes or promotes responsible or irresponsible conduct of research, and how to best instill studentswith this knowledge. In some cases, projects will include the development of interventions to ensure responsible research conduct. Proposals for awards from minority-serving institutions (e.g. Tribal Colleges and Universities, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Alaska Native or Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions), women's colleges, and institutions primarily serving persons with disabilities are strongly encouraged. Proposals including international collaborations are encouraged when those efforts enhance the merit of the proposed work by incorporating unique resources, expertise, facilities or sites of international partners. The U.S. team's international counterparts generally should have support or obtain funding through other sources.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 18-513

The Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) Program serves to increase access to multi-user scientific and engineering instrumentation for research and research training in our Nation's institutions of higher education and not-for-profit scientific/engineering research organizations. An MRI award supports the acquisition or development of a multi-user research instrument that is, in general, too costly and/or not appropriate for support through other NSF programs. MRI provides support to acquire critical research instrumentation without which advances in fundamental science and engineering research may not otherwise occur. MRI also provides support to develop next-generation research instruments that open new opportunities to advance the frontiers in science and engineering research. Additionally, an MRI award is expected to enhance research training of students who will become the next generation of instrument users, designers and builders. An MRI proposal may request up to $4 million for either acquisition or development of a research instrument. Beginning with the FY 2018 competition, each performing organization may submit in revised “Tracks” as defined below, with no more than two submissions in Track 1 and no more than one submission in Track 2. Track 1: Track 1 MRI proposals are those that request funds from NSF greater than or equal to $100,0001 and less than $1,000,000. Track 2: Track 2 MRI proposals are those that request funds from NSF greater than or equal to $1,000,000 up to and including $4,000,000. Consistent with the America COMPETES Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-69), cost sharing of precisely 30% of the total project cost is required for Ph.D.-granting institutions of higher education and for non-degree-granting organizations. Non-Ph.D.-granting institutions of higher education are exempt from the cost-sharing requirement and cannot include it. National Science Board policy prohibits voluntary committed cost sharing. Please see the solicitation text for organizational definitions used by the MRI program. The MRI Program especially seeks broad representation of PIs in its award portfolio, including women, underrepresented minorities and persons with disabilities. Since demographic diversity may be greater among early-career researchers the MRI program also encourages proposals with early-career PIs and proposals that benefit early-career researchers.

Agency Documentation

National Science Foundation - 18-510

The goal of the RCN program is to advance a field or create new directions in research or education by supporting groups of investigators to communicate and coordinate their research, training, and educational activities across disciplinary, organizational, geographic, and international boundaries. The RCN-UBE program originated as a unique RCN track to “catalyze positive changes in biology undergraduate education” (NSF 08-035) and is now supported by the collaborative efforts of the Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO) and the Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR). It has been responsive to the national movement to revolutionize undergraduate learning and teaching in the biological sciences as described in the “Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education” report. The RCN-UBE program seeks to improve undergraduate biology in different areas by leveraging the power of a collaborative network. The theme or focus of an RCN-UBE proposal can be on any topic likely to advance the goal of enhancing undergraduate biology education. Collectively, the program has contributed to developing and disseminating educational research resources and modules, to forging of new collaborations, and to sharing of best practices and ideas for scalability and sustainability of activities. These efforts have involved a large cadre of faculty, students, and other stakeholders. Proposed networking activities directed to the RCN-UBE program should focus on a theme to give coherence to the collaboration. In accord with other RCNs, the RCN-UBE provides opportunities to foster new collaborations (including international partnerships), to address interdisciplinary topics, to explore innovative ideas for implementing novel networking strategies, to explore collaborative technologies, and to develop community standards. RCN-UBE awards do not support existing networks or the activities of established collaborations. RCN awards do not support primary research. Note: Because it addresses undergraduate biology education, the RCN-UBE track is offered in alignment with the NSF-wide undergraduate STEM education initiative, Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE). More information about IUSE can be found in the Program Description section of this solicitation. Depending on the scope and nature of the project, investigators should consider applying to IUSE or RCN-UBE.

Agency Documentation

This file was generated on September 17, 2019 at 6:00 PM.