Spring 2017 Undergraduate Courses

For FMA course descriptions provided by LSU's General Catalog, please click here.

To see a list of graduate courses, please click here.

FMA COURSES
Number Title Time Days Instructor
FMA 2001-01 INTRO: FILM & MEDIA ARTS 3:00-4:20 MW APPLIN, M
FMA 2001-02 INTRO: FILM & MEDIA ARTS 10:30-11:50 TTH OWUSU-BOATENG, V
FMA 3001-01 DIRECTING MOVIES 3:00-5:50 M PITRE, G
FMA 3011-01 EDITING 6:00-8:50 N TH ZEMEL, D
FMA 3503-01 INTRO JAPANESE CIN 6:00-8:50 T BARTON, K
FMA 4001-01 STREAMING SHAKESPEARE 10:30-11:20 MWF BARRETT, C
FMA 4001-02 ADVANCED FILM PRODUCTION 6:00-8:50 N M PITRE, G
         
HISTORY ELECTIVES
ENGL 2231-01 READING FILM: REMAKING & REVIVING OUR MONSTERS 9:30-10:20 MWF NOHNER, L
ENGL 2231-02 READING FILM: FILM ADAPTATIONS 3:00-4:20 TTH VON CANNON, M
ENGL 3133-01 INTRO TO NON-FICTION FILM AND VIDEO 1:30-2:50 TTH CATANO, J
SPAN 4201-01 SPANISH CINEMA 2:30-5:20 W

MARTINS, L

         
THEORY/PRACTICE ELECTIVES
CMST 3013-01 TOPICS IN FILM GENRES 1:30-2:20 MWF SHAFFER, T
  LAB 6:00-8:50 W SMITH H
CMST 3107 RHET CONTEMP MEDIA 10:30-11:20 MWF BUTCHER, J
CMST 4107-01 COMMUNICATION AS CULTURE 3:00-4:20 TTH SAAS, W
ENGL 2009-01 WRITING SCREENPLAYS 6:00-8:50N MWF KORNHAUSER, M
ENGL 2009-02 WRITING SCREENPLAYS 3:00-5:50 T BUCH, J
ENGL 4009-01 ADVANCED SCREENWRITING WORSKHOP 6:00-8:50N T KORNHAUSER, M

 

The following are course descriptions provided by the faculty teaching FMA courses.

 

 

FMA 2001-01: Intro to FMA, Michael E Applin

The purpose of this course is to help students develop an appreciation for the variety of forms of audio-visual media by understanding the processes by which those forms are created, how they differ and how each accomplishes its own goals. It is also the purpose of this course to encourage students to think about the role of film, television and radio in society.

FMA 2001-02: Intro to FMA, Vida Owusu-Boateng

In this introductory course, students will study various film movements from around the world [hence, the focus is on global cinema], learn basic terminology of film analysis, discuss the social, political, cultural and historical influences of films in the representation of cultures and peoples, and practice writing skills through film analysis and interpretation.  

FMA 3001-01: Directing Movies, Glen Pitre

Students interested in directing either traditional movies or other moving-image media will learn the elements, techniques, and disciplines that go into working with actors and crew to shape a film-viewing experience. Students will develop their skills in on-screen storytelling; manipulating performance, mood, and emotion; logistical, technical, and artistic problem-solving; and managing time, money, and people. Focusing more on nuts and bolts than theory and with emphasis on dramatic, narrative filmmaking, classes will explore in detail a film director’s various tasks, tools, and challenges while work-shopping techniques, tricks, and special problems.  In-class examination of clips from existing movies will offer a platform to discuss what makes a scene play, while extensive in-class directing workshops will offer practice in achieving those results and teach students the on-the-fly problem-solving that is the lifeblood of film directing. 

FMA 3011-01: Art of Editing, Dustin R Zemel

This course functions as an in-depth study of the history, concepts, and skills involved in film and video editing techniques. Additionally, students will receive formal instruction and practice in non-linear editing software as a means to gain a better understanding of concepts such as montage, continuity, and narrative. As a theory-practice course, it is broken up into two sections. The first half of the semester will focus primarily on its form and function across various national, historical and generic contexts. The second half of the semester will be more about hands-on learning where students will use the digital technology available to learn essential principles necessary for an editor to perform their vital role in the filmmaking process.

FMA 3503-1: Intro to Japanese Cinema, Kathryn A Barton

This course offers an introduction to the historical study of Japanese cinema.  We will pay close attention to the languages and styles of films as well as the film-historical and socio-cultural contexts.  An analysis and appreciation of major works and genres such as Jidaigeki (period/samurai films), Anime and J-horror will be explored and directors such as Kurosawa, Ozu and Kitano will be introduced. Through secondary readings, lectures, and discussions students will critically examine how Japanese cinema as an institution both responds to and intervenes in the social, cultural, and political history of Japan. No previous classes in Japanese culture or language are required, and all readings, films and discussions are in English.

 

FMA 4001-01: Streaming Shakespeare, Christine Barrett

What does Shakespeare do in the digital age?  This course explores what digital media do to Shakespeare, and what Shakespeare does to digital media. We’ll look at streaming media as it delivers Shakespeare to screens around the world: how does the Bard get altered when he’s not being downloaded?  How does the experience of streaming alter Shakespeare-watchers’ relationship to narrative structure (Act/scene/line, episodes, or clips)?  Does Shakespeare’s sneaking into YouTube channels, apps, and video games change how we understand the plays?  Do concepts like authorship, spectatorship, and adaptation survive in this landscape?

We’ll look at several key texts (Hamlet, Macbeth, and The Tempest) alongside film and digital instantiations.  I’ll provide info on historical context and reception up to the 21st century (playwrights-spies, why theaters sometimes dripped blood, Queen Elizabeth I’s fungus, secrets about how the Globe Theatre burned to the ground).  But our primary focus is thinking critically and analytically about adaptation and remediation of Shax’s works in the digital age.  Our assignments will cultivate communication skills and analytical skills demanded by employers, while lectures include puppets, swords, wigs, Lady Gaga, special effects, lots of screens, and (occasionally) dancing.  You’ll leave with newly honed skills for formal analysis and a robust critical vocabulary applicable to today’s media culture.

 

FMA 4001-02: Advanced Production in Film, Glen Pitre

[The course objective is] To teach current on-set practices and procedures for narrative filmmaking sufficient to prepare students, within their chosen technical specialty, for entry-level positions on a professional movie crew and for more responsible positions on student films, shorts, and other low-budget productions. Students will each be assigned to one of ten different tracks, each representing a different department on a film crew: Camera, Sound, Art, Wardrobe, Makeup, etc. (Each student will also "understudy" a second, different specialty.) After a few classes devoted to pre-production (i.e., planning and prep), subsequent meetings of the class will each be devoted to shooting a specific scene(s) of a class film with individual students handling their department’s tasks. Some of these will shoot in Coates 151 where the class meets, but many classes will be held at other locations, both on and off campus. (Car pools will be arranged as needed.)