News and Profiles

MFA Students

Ph.D. Students

 

 

student Nicholas Alexandre
   

student

Stacey Amo is a 5th year Ph.D. candidate in English with a minor in Women's and Gender Studies. She specializes in 20th and 21st century Anglophone literature, food studies, and gender and sexuality and expects to defend her dissertation, "Dinner is Severed: The Fooding of Narrative in Contemporary Women's Fiction," in the spring of 2016. She will be presenting at SSAWW in November and at MLA in January.

 

 

 

Rei

Rei Asaba

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Benjamin Bergholtz grew up in Orlando, Florida and studied English Literature at the University of Central Florida. He taught U.S. and World History as  well as Civics at the high school level before beginning graduate study last Fall. He is interested in studying the relationship between literature and praxis,  both historically and in the contemporary world.

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 Maggie Callahan

 

 

Christie

Christie Cognevich is a PhD candidate at Louisiana State University currently at work on her dissertation project, Inside Voice: Nineteenth-Century Female Sonneteers and the Emotional Cadence of Silence. She holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree in English from the University of New Orleans. Her article “Ghostly Markings: Aesthetic Criminality, Acts, and Supernatural Identity in Wilde’s ‘The Canterville Ghost’” was recently published in the Supernatural Studies Association Journal’s Summer 2015 special topic issue “Supernatural and the 19th Century.” She received the Roberts Nardo Award for Excellence in Research in the Fall of 2015 and was named LSU Phi Kappa Phi’s Outstanding Terminal Degree Student Award in the Spring of 2015. She was a 2014 NeMLA Summer Research Fellow, a 2013 Everett Helm Visiting Fellow at the Lilly Library at Indiana University, and attended the 2014 DHSI “Understanding the Pre-Digital Book” course on a scholarship to study 19th century archival material at the University of Victoria in Canada.

   

Jeremy

Jeremy Cornelius

   

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Vicki Davis worked as a stage manager, actress, theatre critic, and elementary school teacher before earning an M.A. in English from Tennessee Tech University, where she specialized in mid-Victorian literature, feminist theory, and adaptation theory.

 

 

student

Caleb Doan

 

 

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 Nathan Erro

 

 

Laura

Laura Fallon

   
student Amandine Faucheux
   

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Megan Feifer is a doctoral candidate in English with a minor in Women’s and Gender Studies. She received her M.A. in 2008 from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in English (Modern Studies). Her teaching and research interests include: Afro-Caribbean Diasporas in the U.S. and Postcolonial Literatures and Theories. Recent conference presentations include: “Salvaging the Self: Re-Writing Representations of Southern Blackness in Jesmyn Ward’s Salvage the Bones,” “To Create Dangerously is to Create Fearlessly:” Writing and Risk in Edwidge Danticat’s Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work,” and “Representing the Southern Wild: Cinematic Aesthetic and Benh Zeitlin’s Beasts of the Southern Wild”. She is a co-founder of the up-and-coming Edwidge Danticat Society and actively volunteers with the organization Other Worlds. Current publications include: the Review of The Cambridge History of Postcolonial Literature edited by Ato Quayson.

 

 

 

student Elizabeth Gilliland
   
student Hanna Groniger
   

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Candice N. Hale is pursuing a PhD in English Literature and a minor in Women's and Gender Studies. She graduated from the University of Alabama in 2007 and focused her MA thesis on Nella Larsen's Quicksand, examining racial identity and sexuality. Her primary interests are African American literature and Women's Studies. Her current research focuses on the biracial character and the politics of race, identity, and performance in African American literature and Southern literature. Recent conference papers include "From Slavery to Civil Rights: Looking at Black and White Female Relationships in The Help and Dessa Rose" and "Mother Doesn't Always Know Best:  Mothering Biracial Children in the Contemporary Literature of Heidi Durrow." She is currently teaching a course called "Gender, Race, and Nation" in the Women's and Gender Studies Department.

 

 

student Lindsay Head

 

 

student Charla Hughes
   

 student

 Darren Hutchinson

 

 

 student

 Christine Jeansonne is a New Orleans native and a first year PhD student at Louisiana State University majoring in rhetoric and composition and minoring in Women’s and Gender Studies. She holds a bachelor’s and master’s in English from Louisiana State University. She is currently the pedagogy co-chair of the English Graduate Student Association at LSU.

 

 

student William Jones
   
Eric Eric Kennedy
   

 student

 Brandon Katzir

 

 

Lindsay

Lindsay Katzir

   
Olanike Olanike Lawore
   
Kieron Kieron Lyons
   
student Jack Mallard
   

 student

Isaac S. McDuffie

 

 

 student

 Ryan McGuckin

 

 

 student

 Steven Monk

 

 

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 Rimun Murad's main area of interest is Arab American or Arab immigrant culture and literature in twentieth-century America. He has been teaching college composition since 2007, when he began his Masters program. As a first-year PhD student, he is still enjoying his required coursework, but he is also looking forward to honing in on his area of interest in the near future.

 

 

Josh

Josh Myers

   
Taylor Taylor Orgeron
   

 student

 Mary Pappalardo

 

 

 student

 Martha B. Pitts A graduate of Princeton University, Martha is pursuing a PhD in English literature with a minor in Women's and Gender studies. Her research interests include gender ideology in 19th-century American literature and culture, life narratives, feminist theory, and feminist pedagogy. She has presented papers at the National Women's Studies Association's conference, the Society for the Study of Southern Literature conference, and Tulane University's inaugural Black Women's Health Conference. Martha has had freelance pieces published in Gambit Weekly in New Orleans and the Washington City Paper in DC.  As a blogger for Ms., she writes about  issues related to motherhood, black women, and popular culture. Last summer (2011), Martha was a fellow in the National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute, "The Role of Place in African American Biography." She is also a storyteller and scholar for the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities Prime Time family literacy program.

 

 

Molly

Molly Porter

   
Leah Leah Powell
   
Lauren Lauren Rackley
   

 student

 Cristina Rosell

 

 

 student

 Charley Silvio

 

 

 student

 Amanda Swenson

 

 

student Alejandra Torres
   
student Matthew Tougas
   

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 Eliza Urban graduated from the College of William and Mary in 2013 with a B.A. in English Literature.  During her undergraduate career, she built considerable experience as a director, stage manager, and costume designer for her university's student-run Shakespeare company - experience that proved valuable for her current research.  Her main areas of study are Victorian literature and drama, focusing on adaptation theory and the performative aspects of monstrosity.

 

 

student Kelly Vines
   
student Sarah Webb is currently a Ph.D. student in the Department of English at LSU. Her primary research interests include literacy, multicultural literature, digital media, and black women's studies. She also blogs about colorism. Sarah received an M.F.A. in Writing from California College of the Arts and a B.A. in English from Mississippi State University. Before enrolling at LSU, she managed websites and social media accounts for local TV stations, taught high school English and college writing courses, and worked as a freelance writer and editor. Sarah's creative writing has been published in multiple literary journals and an edited anthology titled Roll: A Collection of Personal Narratives. Her academic publications and presentations include, "Photojournalism and Ideals of Western Superiority in Ben Okri's The Famished Road," published by San Francisco State University.
   
Liz Elizabeth Wells
   

 student

 Anna West is a doctoral student with interests in the areas of youth, writing, performance and public pedagogy. She is the founding director of WordPlay Teen Writing Project in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the former director of Young Chicago Authors, winner of the 2010 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award. She co-founded Louder Than a Bomb, the acclaimed Chicago teen poetry slam festival and subject of an award-winning documentary film of that same name. She holds a B.A. in creative writing from Columbia College Chicago and an M.Ed. in Arts in Education from Harvard Graduate School of Education, where she was the recipient of the 2011 Arts in Education Faculty Recognition-Intellectual Contribution Award. Her article, "Call and responsibility: Critical questions for youth spoken word poetry," co-written with Sue Weinstein, is forthcoming from Harvard Educational Review.