Louisiana State University
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School of Library and Information Science
Cavan McCarthy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor (Retired)
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TEACHING

Note: I retired from LSU on August 8, 2008. The list of courses below was accurate at the time of my retirement.

 
2008 Summer Session
June 9 - July 30
 
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES
LIS 7008

LIS 7008 Information Technologies. Summer session, 2008, June 9 - July 30. Web based course. All work will be submitted electronically. There will be no formal class meetings, and it will not be necessary to be online at specific times. Class notes will be posted by 1:30 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays. Assignments will be due by 1:30 p.m. on Wednesdays. The activities of this course do not clash with the schedule of any other course. Three credits.

This course is a requirement for all students seeking the MLIS degree and is vital because it brings participants up to speed with the technology currently needed by professionals in this field.

This course aims to familiarize students with all aspects of the technology currently used in libraries and information systems, so that they will be able to approach it confidently in the later stages of the course and of their professional careers. 

The course will demonstrate and exemplify the use of Information Technology in modern libraries and information systems, via the use of demonstrations, practical activities and hands-on exercises.

Special attention will be paid to major information systems, notably databases and Internet. 

Students will be expected to be able to discuss the development of Information Technology and its impact on modern society, culture and institutions and exemplify how IT contributes to public service and access to information.

Click here for a recent syllabus for this course

LSU used the Blackboard educational technology system until the end of the Spring 2008 semester. Beginning with the Summer 2008 session, this course and other former Blackboard courses will be presented using Moodle open-source software. The Moodle site, with the definitive syllabus, bibliography, etc. will be inaugurated during the first class, at 1:30 p.m. on June 9.

TEXTBOOK:

Whitehead, Paul and Russell, James H. HTML: your visual blueprint for designing web pages with HTML, CSS, and XHTML. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley; 2005. 305 p. $24.99. ISBN: 076458331X.
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-076458331X,descCd-tableOfContents.html
"Offers professional-level instruction in Web page design in a unique visual format, with most tasks demonstrated on self-contained two-page spreads. Key tasks covered include setting up a Web page, reducing image resolution, creating radio buttons, and adding an embedded sound. High-resolution screen shots accompanied by succinct explanations clearly illustrate each task, while "Apply It" and "Extra" sidebars highlight useful tips". (Publisher).


SOFTWARE

We will be using Microsoft software; you can use either the Microsoft XP or the Microsoft Vista operating systems. Word, PowerPoint, Excel and Access are available in the SLIS Lab; EndNote, Dreamweaver and KompoZer are also available there. If you wish to work on your home computer, it would be useful for you to have Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and Access, which are available as part of the Microsoft Office 2003 or 2007 packages. Office 2007 runs well on Microsoft XP. LSU students can download either version of Microsoft Office free via TigerWare. Most students have now adopted Office 2007, but either version can be used for assignments. TigerWare offers graduate students EndNote and other citation software. A free demo version of Dreamweaver is available from the Dreamweaver site. KompoZer is an open source software, available free of charge.

 
OTHER COURSES
 
 

DIGITAL LIBRARIES

LIS 7410

LIS 7410 Digital Libraries. Spring semester, 2008. Web based course; Jan. 15 - May 6, 2008. All work will be submitted electronically. There will be no formal class meetings, and it will not be necessary to be online at specific times. Class notes will be posted by 5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays. Assignments will also be due by 5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays. The activities of this course do not clash with the schedule of any other course.

Prerequisite: LIS 7008 Information Technologies or permission of the instructor; participants who have not taken LIS 7008 will be expected to have had some experience of web site creation. Three credit course.

Registration procedures (permission of instructor):

If you have completed LIS 7008 or expect to complete it in Fall 2007: register for LIS 7410; the admissions secretary will check your records and will automatically confirm your registration.

If you do not have the LIS 7008 prerequisite: register for LIS 7410; simultaneously send e-mail to Prof. McCarthy at:

confirming that you have had some experience of web site construction. If you have adequate background, your registration will be confirmed.

Course description:

An overview of current digital library programs and activities, both in North America and internationally.

This course will familiarize students with the major techniques and software used in the creation and maintenance of digital libraries.

Participants will obtain hands-on experience in the planning and creation of digital libraries.

This course is an opportunity for students to bring themselves up-to-date in an important and rapidly expanding area.

Click here for a syllabus for this course

Click here for a flyer for this course

The Blackboard site, with the definitive syllabus, bibliography, etc. will be inaugurated during the first class, at 5:30 p.m. on Jan. 15.


TEXTBOOK:

Lesk, Michael. Understanding digital libraries. 2nd ed. San Francisco: Morgan Kaufmann; Boston: Elsevier; 2005. 424 p. (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Multimedia and Information Systems). $49.95. ISBN: 1558609245.
http://books.elsevier.com/us/mk/us/subindex.asp?isbn=1558609245&country=United+States&community=mk
"This fully revised and updated second edition of Understanding Digital Libraries focuses on the challenges faced by both librarians and computer scientists in a field that has been dramatically altered by the growth of the Web. At every turn, the goal is practical: to show you how things you might need to do are already being done, or how they can be done. The first part of the book is devoted to technology and examines issues such as varying media requirements, indexing and classification, networks and distribution, and presentation. The second part of the book is concerned with the human contexts in which digital libraries function. Here you’ll find specific and useful information on usability, preservation, scientific applications, and thorny legal and economic questions" (Publisher).

This book is also available via NetLibrary: http://libezp.lib.lsu.edu/login?url=http://www.netLibrary.com/urlapi.asp?action=summary&v=1&bookid=123435

 
INTERNET INFORMATION RETRIEVAL
LIS 7911 Section #02 (Special topics)

LIS 7911 Section # 02 Internet Information Retrieval (Special topics). Summer Session, 2007, June 11 - Aug. 1. Web based course. All work will be submitted electronically. There will be no formal class meetings, and it will not be necessary to be online at specific times. Class notes will be posted by 5:30 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays. Assignments will also be due by 5:30 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays. The activities of this course do not clash with the schedule of any other course. Three credit course; call # 3008.

Prerequisite: LIS 7008 Information Technologies or permission of the instructor; participants who have not taken LIS 7008 will be expected to have had some experience of databases or information retrieval.

Registration procedures (permission of instructor):

If you have completed LIS 7008 or expect to complete it before taking LIS 7911: register for LIS 7911 Section # 02; the admissions secretary will check your records and will automatically confirm your registration.

If you do not have the LIS 7008 prerequisite: register for LIS 7911 Section # 02; simultaneously send e-mail to Prof. McCarthy at:

confirming that you have had some experience of databases or information retrieval. If you have adequate background, your registration will be confirmed.

Course Description: Problems and solutions in information retrieval in an Internet environment. Search languages, search engines, meta search engines, directories, evaluation of results and other relevant procedures and techniques.

This course aims to familiarize students with both the theoretical and practical aspects of this dynamic field, enabling them to retrieve information efficiently and accurately within an Internet environment, and to evaluate it.

The course will demonstrate and exemplify the use of search languages, directories, search engines, metasearch engines, specialized softwares, and other techniques to optimize retrieval from Internet.

Students will review the development of Internet searching and its relationship with copyright, information policy, and society.

The course will concentrate on retrieval from publicly accessible resources; it will therefore pay significant attention to the evaluation of results, a major problem with Internet.

Click here for a syllabus for this course

Click here for the flyer for this course

Textbook requirements:

Hock, Randolph. The extreme searcher's Internet handbook: a guide for the serious searcher. 2nd ed. Medford, N.J: CyberAge Books; 2007. 344 p. http://books.infotoday.com/books/ExtSeaHan2.shtml
ISBN-10: 0-910965-76-5; ISBN-13: 978-0-910965-76-7

Notess, Greg R. Teaching Web search skills: techniques and strategies of top trainers. Medford, N.J: Information Today, Inc.; 2006. 344 p. http://books.infotoday.com/books/TeachingWebSearchSkills.shtml
ISBN-10: 1-57387-267-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-57387-267-6

 
INTERNATIONAL LIBRARY AND
INFORMATION SYSTEMS

LIS 7911 (Special topics)

LIS 7911, Special Topics. Web-based course. Fall semester, 2006. Mondays, Aug. 28 - Dec. 11, 2006. All work will be submitted electronically via Blackboard. Class notes will be posted by 5:30 p.m. on Mondays. Assignments will also be due by 5:30 p.m. on Mondays. There will be no formal class meetings and it will not be necessary to be online at specific times; the activities of this course do not clash with the schedule of any other course. 3 credits, Call # 6950.

An analysis of modern library and information systems, communication technologies and Internet in a global context and their impact on society, culture, economy, national sovereignty and daily life at an international level. This course introduces students to a wide panorama of library and information services outside the United States.  It enables them to make meaningful comparisons between the development of library and information services in different parts of the world.  Participants will be familiarized with a variety of foreign software, databases, and Internet resources which are not commonly accessed from within the United States.  Participants will have the opportunity to study specific aspects of foreign library and information science in depth.   

COURSE GOALS

Demonstrate and exemplify the role of information and communication systems and Internet within a global society.

Analyze the cultural, social and economic impacts of digital inclusion and information systems outside the United States.

Develop amongst students an awareness of the problems involved in cross-cultural transfer and usage of information.

Demonstrate software relevant to library and information activities, developed outside North America.

Give participants an awareness of the commercial, informational, copyright and social impacts of international library and information systems.

READINGS, ETC.

It will not be necessary to purchase a textbook for this course. Readings will be available online.

Click here for a syllabus for this course

Click here for the flyer for this course

 
BIBLIOGRAPHIC ORGANIZATION AND RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT
LIS 7012

Last taught Summer 2004.

Click here for a recent syllabus for this course

 
Updated October 10, 2008
Prof. McCarthy
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