Manship School of Mass Communication


JOHN M. HAMILTON
Dean, LSU Foundation Hopkins P. Breazeale Professor of Mass Communication

RONALD GARAY
Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies and Administration

RALPH IZARD
Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research

221 Journalism Building
225/578-2336
FAX 225/578-2125

REMAL DASS AND LACHMI DEVI BHATIA MEMORIAL PROFESSOR Anderson

BLUE CROSS/BLUE SHIELD OF LOUISIANA PROFESSOR IN HEALTH COMMUNICATIONS Sylvester

LSU FOUNDATION HOPKINS P. BREAZEALE PROFESSOR Hamilton

DORIS WESTMORELAND DARDEN PROFESSOR Li

HUIE-DELLMON PROFESSOR Daniels

HOWARD AND NANTELLE MITCHINER GITTINGER PROFESSOR OF MASS COMMUNICATION Kurpius

G. LEE GRIFFIN DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR Lindsay

SCRIPPS HOWARD PROFESSOR IN MEDIA AND POLITICS Wu

DOUGLAS L. MANSHIP, SR. PROFESSOR Cunningham

MANSHIP CHAIR IN MASS COMMUNICATION Dickinson

MARY P. POINDEXTER PROFESSOR Perlmutter

BART R. SWANSON PROFESSOR Wu

DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR Ross

PROFESSORS Day, Fletcher, Garay, Hamilton, Izard, Lindsay, Nelson, Windhauser

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS McMullen, Perkins, Perlmutter, Sylvester

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS Anderson, Cunningham, Daniels, d'Hemecourt, Kurpius, Li, Wu

INSTRUCTORS Brown, Snipes

PROFESSIONALS-IN-RESIDENCE Dickinson, Saccopoulos

ADJUNCT FACULTY Michelet, Reilly, Sands, Serebrov, Spence



MISSION OF THE MANSHIP SCHOOL

The mission of the Manship School of Mass Communication is to teach the principles and skills of mass communication to students dedicated to pursuing successful professional careers. This body of knowledge is integrated with a liberal arts education to foster intellectual curiosity, critical thinking, and an appreciation for the pervasive influence that the mass media have within society. To these ends, the school is committed to the fundamental objectives of teaching, research and/or creative activities, and service.



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

The Manship School of Mass Communication is a professional school, enrolling students no earlier than their sophomore year. Admission is by application only. The number of spaces varies from semester to semester, as determined by availability of staff and facilities.

Applications for admission to the School must be submitted directly to the Mass Communication Office, Room 221, Journalism Building. The deadline is 4:00 p.m. on Friday of the first full week of each semester. Students may apply at any time after they have completed 30 hours of course work. Transfer students must be currently enrolled in classes at Louisiana State University before submitting an application to this School.

Applicants presenting the highest qualifications will be accepted into the School each semester of the academic year. Students with a 3.00 grade point average and at least a "B" in MC 2010 will be given priority for admission on a space available basis. Other factors taken into account in the admission process are the need to balance enrollment among the School's areas of concentration, demographic diversity, demonstrated professional potential through work on high school or college media, or other life experiences that suggest a strong likelihood of success as a communication professional. Students who are denied admission may reapply for admission in a subsequent semester; however, each student is limited to two applications.

Transfer Students. Transfer students will be admitted to the Manship School only after completing a minimum of 12 hours of courses on the LSU A&M campus with at least a 3.00 LSU gpa and a 3.00 cumulative gpa. Those students transferring into the university with less than 60 hours will be assigned to the University College until their applications for admission into the School can be processed. They will then be admitted according to the same procedures described above.

The appearance of a mass communication curriculum code on any University document does not constitute admission to the Manship School of Mass Communication.



READMISSION

Students who were not registered at LSU for the preceding regular semester must file a formal application for readmission. Readmission to the Manship School of Mass Communication is not automatic.



STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

Students in the Manship School bear final responsibility for selection of their academic programs and adherence to all published regulations and requirements of the school and the University. Each student must see a counselor for a final degree checkout during the semester prior to the semester in which the degree is to be awarded.

Ignorance of the rule is not grounds for waiving that rule.

Mass communication students are expected to be proficient in the use of English. Proficiency in keyboarding is also required. This proficiency should be acquired before students enroll in MC 2010. All written assignments must be typewritten. Students must provide word processors or typewriters for all of their assignments except those written in scheduled laboratories. Mass communication majors must earn at least a "C" in any mass communication course. For any mass communication course, a "C" or better is required in prerequisite mass communication courses.





MANSHIP SCHOOL OF MASS COMMUNICATION

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE



Curriculum


Degree


Mass Communication


Bachelor of Arts in Mass Communication


AREAS OF CONCENTRATION

The Bachelor of Mass Communication (B.A.M.C.) degree is conferred on students who complete a concentration in one of the following five areas: advertising, electronic media, journalism, political communication, and public relations. All areas are fully accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

The advertising concentration develops skills in marketing, research, media, and creative planning and execution. Graduates typically become involved in account development and management; media analysis, research, and sales; copywriting; advertising design; and sales promotion.

The electronic media concentration prepares students for careers in sales, promotion, program production, and management for the various electronic media industries, including radio, television, cable, and the emerging technologies. Graduates normally aspire to careers in electronic media sales and sales management, promotion, or programming.

The journalism concentration merges courses formerly listed under broadcast journalism and news editorial. The concentration develops skills in researching, interpreting, organizing, and reporting in a factual manner issues of vital importance to a democratic society. Students are cross-trained in the format and structure of journalism for print (newspapers and magazines), broadcasting (radio and television), and in the newly emerging journalism of targeted computer-mediated dissemination. Graduates usually become reporters, editors, and producers.

The political communication concentration develops skills in interpreting and communicating information to mass media practitioners and other individuals involved in the political process. Students normally aspire to careers in public or governmental communication, political reporting, and political campaigns.

The public relations concentration develops skills and prepares future practitioners in planning and executing the building of relationships and coalitions to advance an enterprise. Graduates typically move to positions in media, governmental, investor, community, and employee relations; special events management; issues management; and public relations counseling.



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

General education requirements of the University are included in the curriculum for Mass Communication. For specific information concerning these requirements, see the "General Education Requirements" section of this catalog.



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS OF THE SCHOOL

To qualify for a bachelor's degree in this school, a candidate must satisfy these requirements:

A minimum grade-point average of 2.00 ("A" = 4) on all work taken in the LSU system and on all work taken.

A minimum grade-point average in the major field (Mass Communication) of 2.00 ("A" = 4) on all work taken in the LSU system and on all work taken.

At least a "C" in any mass communication course. (In addition, for any mass communication course, a "C" or better is required in prerequisite mass communication courses.)

A minimum of 128 semester hours of degree credit.

A minimum of 34 semester hours in courses numbered 2000 or above and an additional 30 semester hours in courses numbered 3000 or above.

Degree credit will not be allowed for more than nine semester hours of 1000-level mathematics courses below 1550.

A minimum of 18 semester hours in residence in Mass Communication, including at least nine hours in courses numbered 3000 or above.

A minimum of 30 semester hours in residence in the Manship School. The last year of work (30 semester hours) will be taken in residence in this school on the LSU campus.

A minor in one department other than mass communication. The minor will be defined by the minor department. In departments that have not defined a minor, one will consist of 18 hours of courses, at least six of which must be numbered 3000 or above.

English proficiency--a "C" or better in ENGL 1002. Students who enter the school before they take ENGL 1002 must take the course their first semester in the school.

Foreign language--a level of proficiency in one foreign language as required in the Mass Communication curriculum. Students should take a placement test and register at the appropriate level. Credit, up to a maximum of 14 semester hours, may be earned by placement.

Students who have a native fluency in a language other than English may satisfy the foreign language requirement in one of three ways: (a) by completing the prescribed number of hours in the curriculum for the B.A. or B.S. degree in a language other than English or their native language; (b) by taking a minimum of six hours in courses numbered 3000 or above in their native language; or (c) by taking nine semester hours of English and/or speech above the minimum requirements, as stated in the curriculum for the B.A. or the B.S. degree. (Only three hours may be earned in English 2001, 2002, or 2010 to meet this requirement. Professional and specialized courses in speech may not be counted toward this requirement.)

Students who have a native fluency in a language other than English should consult credit restrictions in that language under the appropriate foreign language department entry in this section of the catalog.



ELECTIVES

Students may choose any degree credit courses offered by the University consistent with their degree requirements. However, no more than 12 semester hours of ROTC or eight hours of kinesiology may be counted for degree credit.



PASS-FAIL OPTION

Students may not elect the pass-fail grading option for courses within their major. Only the internship (3998) and independent study (4999) courses are graded on a pass-fail basis.



TRANSFER OF CREDIT FROM OTHER INSTITUTIONS

In the Manship School, transfer credits accepted by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions shall be valid for degree credit only to the extent to which they satisfy courses in the curriculum of the school. Credit in mass communication courses in which grades of "D" have been earned is not accepted for transfer toward the degree requirements, if the course is taken outside the LSU system. Students enrolled in this school who wish to obtain credits from other colleges or universities (including other campuses of the LSU System) and who plan to use such credits toward degree requirements should obtain prior approval in writing on a specific-course basis from the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies.



CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION CREDIT

A maximum of 32 semester hours of credit in the above categories is acceptable toward meeting degree requirements. Students who wish to have correspondence credits accepted by the Manship School must make their registration in correspondence courses a matter of record in the office of the dean in the school at the time of such registration.

Students registered in the school may enroll in a maximum of 19 semester hours of combined resident and correspondence course work during a regular semester. They may enroll in a maximum of 12 semester hours of combined resident and correspondence work during a summer term. Students may not be enrolled in correspondence course work the semester they intend to graduate. Depending on the correspondence course, a special time limit may be imposed by the dean's office.



MINOR FIELD REQUIREMENTS

Students may apply to declare a minor in Mass Communication after completion of 30 semester hours of coursework and successful completion of MC 2010. Those who have completed 30 semester hours with a least a 3.00 gpa and MC 2010 with at least a grade of "B" will automatically be allowed to minor in Mass Communications. Applicants who do not meet both of these standards will be allowed in the minor on a space available basis, beginning with the highest gpa average and proceeding in descending order until the spaces are filled.




Business Administration

To graduate with a minor in business administration, students must complete ACCT 2001, 2101 or 2021; ECON 2010 and 2020 or 2030/2031; FIN 3715; ISDS 1100; MGT 3200; MKT 3401; and one business administration elective.


Mass Communication

General Minor Students desiring to pursue a general minor in mass communication must complete the following six core courses: MC 2000, 2010, 2020, 3018, 3080, 4090.


Visual Communication for Students in Design

To graduate with a minor in visual communication, students must complete the following 18 hours: MC 2010, 2015, 3065, 3200, 4010, 4270. This minor is open only to students in the College of Design.



CURRICULUM IN MASS COMMUNICATION

TOTAL SEM. HRS. 128

Students majoring in mass communication must complete at least 36 hours in mass communication courses, including 18 hours of core courses--MC 2010, 2015, 2020, 3018, 3080, and 4090--and all of the requirements under one of the areas of concentration listed below: advertising, electronic media, journalism, political communication, or public relations.

*Students choosing French, German, or Spanish as their foreign language will take four to eight hours, depending on placement. Other languages may require as many as ten hours. Some adjustment in elective hours may be necessary.

**MC 2000 is counted as a general education humanities course.

FRESHMAN YEAR
SEM. HRS.
English 1000/1001, 1002 6
Foreign language courses* 8-10
History 1001, 1003 or Geography 1001, 1003 6
Mass Communication 2000** 3
Mathematics 1021 or 1029 3
General education sciences courses (year course in biological or physical sciences) 6
Library and Information Science 1001 1
TOTAL 33-35

SOPHOMORE YEAR
SEM. HRS.
Economics 2010, 2020, or 2030 3-6
General education analytical reasoning course 3
General education biological or physical sciences course 3
History 2055, 2057 6
Mass Communication 2010, 2015, 2020 9
Area of concentration courses 0-3
Social sciences general education course 3
Approved humanities or social sciences course 3
TOTAL 30-36

JUNIOR YEAR
SEM. HRS.
Area of concentration courses 9-12
Mass Communication 3018, 3080 6
Approved electives 6-9
Approved social sciences or humanities courses 9
TOTAL 30-36

SENIOR YEAR
SEM. HRS.
Mass Communication 4090 3
Area of concentration courses 12-15
General education arts course (select from art, music,philosophy, theatre) 3
Approved social sciences or humanities electives 6
Approved electives 6-9
TOTAL 30-36

Areas of Concentration

Advertising (27 hrs.)

Mass communication requirements (12 hrs.): MC 3031, 4034, 4036, 4040; electives (6 hrs.); other requirements (9 hrs.): ACCT 2000 or 2001, MKT 3401, 3421.

Electronic Media (21 hrs.)

Mass communication requirements (12 hrs.): MC 3650, 3700, 4035, 4710; electives (6 hrs.); other requirements (3 hrs.): ACCT 2000 or 2001.


Journalism (21 hrs.)

Mass communication requirements (12 hrs.): MC 3200, 3202, 3210, and one of the following: MC 4010, 4081, 4250, 4260, 4270; electives (6 hrs.); other requirements (3 hrs.): ACCT 2000 or 2001, or one approved statistics course.

Political Communication (24 hrs.)

Mass communication requirements (12 hrs.): MC 3200, 3210, 3500, and 4510 or 4515; electives (6 hrs.); other requirements (6 hrs.): SPCM 4100 or POLI 2051; EXST 2201 or an equivalent approved statistics course or ACCT 2000 or ACCT 2001.


Public Relations (27 hrs.)

Mass communication requirements (12 hrs.): MC 3010, 4001, 4005, and 4034; electives (6 hrs.); other requirements (9 hrs.): ACCT 2000 or 2001, MGT 3200, MKT 3401.


PRACTICAL MEDIA EXPERIENCE

Mass communication students gain considerable practical experience to supplement classroom instruction. In some courses, students work on news and advertising assignments for The Reveille, for the campus radio station, KLSU, and for the campus television station, LSU-TV. Students in advanced reporting courses acquire experience with the Baton Rouge Advocate, and other local media.


PLACEMENT SERVICES

Students in the Manship School may use the services of the University's Career Services Center. These services include counseling, job-seeking skills workshops, job search handbooks, resume service, career days, and on-campus recruiting and interviews.



STUDY ABROAD

Students in the Manship School are encouraged to participate in the study abroad programs administered by the Office of Academic Programs Abroad and the International Student Exchange Program. Students who participate in these programs must receive school evaluation of the courses to be taken. In addition, students must make an appointment with a counselor to ensure that degree credit will be granted upon return to LSU.



NATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE

LSU cooperates with a number of other universities throughout the U.S. in an exchange program. Students may spend one year (usually the junior year) at another university at little or no more cost than they pay at LSU. Additional information can be obtained from the Office of Academic Programs Abroad.




MANSHIP SCHOOL STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION

The Manship School Student Government Association serves as a liaison between the Manship School undergraduate student body and the school's dean. The Association is also the official representative to the LSU Student Government Association.


HONOR SOCIETIES

Students in the Manship School are eligible for membership in several national honorary organizations.

Phi Kappa Phi is one of the most prestigious scholastic honor societies in the United States. Phi Kappa Phi was founded in 1897 and now contains 282 chapters nationwide. The LSU Chapter was founded in 1930 as the 43rd chapter in the nation. The primary objectives of Phi Kappa Phi are to promote the pursuit of excellence in higher education and to recognize outstanding achievement by students and faculty through election to membership and through various awards and fellowships. Phi Kappa Phi is unique because it recognizes superior scholarship in all academic fields, rather than restricting membership to a limited field. Juniors in the top five percent and seniors and graduate students in the top ten percent of their classes may be invited to become members of Phi Kappa Phi. New LSU Phi Kappa Phi

members are initiated and honored in the spring semester each year and wear identifying ribbons on their academic gowns at commencement exercises.

Kappa Tau Alpha is a national honor society designed to encourage and recognize outstanding scholarship. KTA is the only honor society in journalism and mass communication recognized by the Association of College Honor Societies. Membership in the LSU chapter is by invitation only to students with a 3.5 or better gpa within the top ten percent of the junior and senior classes. Exceptional graduate students may also receive invitations.

Omicron Delta Kappa is the national leadership honor society for college students that recognizes and encourages superior scholarship, leadership, and exemplary character. Membership is awarded to undergraduate junior and senior students--and occasionally to students in graduate school--as well as to faculty, staff, and community members. Student membership candidates must rank academically in the upper 35 percent in the school/college and must demonstrate leadership. Membership in ODK is a mark of highest distinction.


THE HONORS PROGRAM

An honors program is available to Manship students. Requirements may be obtained from the Honors College, 205 French House.