Basic Sciences


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COLLEGE OF
Basic Sciences

HAROLD SILVERMAN
Dean

KENNETH M. BROWN
Associate Dean

MARTHA A. CEDOTAL
Assistant to the Dean

MARY BETH ELFERT
Counselor

ASHLEY JUNEK
Counselor

 

338 Choppin Hall
225/388-4200
FAX 225/388-8826

The College of Basic Sciences offers preparation for careers in biochemistry, all areas of the biological sciences, chemistry, computer science, geology and geophysics, micro-biology, and physics and astronomy. Students are also provided with strong academic backgrounds for professional study in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and many other careers that require in-depth study of science.

The departments within the college, the various curricula, and the degrees that may be earned are shown in the following chart. These curricula provide broad general education as well as knowledge of the structure of science. Students in the college may also choose curricula that provide premedical preparation, including curricula in biochemistry, biological sciences, chemistry with a life sciences concentration, computer science with a life sciences concentration, microbiology, and physics.

The programs of the college are accredited by all the recognized national organizations concerned with such functions. Classroom and laboratory study may be supplemented by contact with active research programs.

The Department of Computer Science offers work leading to the bachelor's and doctoral degrees in computer science and is a participating department in the University's graduate program leading to the Master of Science in Systems Science degree. The other departments of the college offer work leading to the bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees.

For specific information concerning undergraduate degree programs, refer to the curricula offered by the departments on the following pages. Detailed information about graduate degree programs may be obtained from the Graduate Bulletin.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

University College students who contemplate entering this college should give special attention to the mathematics and science courses they select and should consult a representative of the department they plan to enter prior to completing their initial registration.

University College students will be admitted to the college when they:

have earned 24 or more semester hours of credit in courses numbered 1000 or above;
have maintained a grade-point average of at least 2.00;
have passed all courses in mathematics and science with grades of "C" or better or received special approval of the dean of the college;
have passed ENGL 1002 or the equivalent with a grade of "C" or better;
are eligible for MATH 1550.

Transfer students from other divisions of the University or from other accredited colleges or universities will be permitted to enter the college when they: (1) present, by means of an official transcript, evidence that they have met the same requirements as students entering from University College; and (2) receive approval of the dean of the college.

Students who, after initial enrollment in this college, wish to obtain credits from colleges or universities other than LSU and who plan to offer such credits toward their degree requirements must obtain prior approval from the dean on a specific-course basis.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

Students in this college bear final responsibility for selection of their academic programs and adherence to all published regulations and requirements of the college and the University. Each student must see his or her counselor in the college office for a final degree checkout during the semester prior to the semester in which the degree is to be awarded.

CORRESPONDENCE, EXTENSION, AND INTERSESSION CREDIT

Correspondence and extension credit may be accepted toward meeting degree requirements only with approval of the dean of the college and may not exceed a total of 12 hours. Students in the College of Basic Sciences may not register for more than three semester hours of credit during Intersession without approval of the dean.

Students in residence may take courses by correspondence only in exceptional cases (e.g., conflicts between single sections of required courses) and with specific approval of the dean of the college.

Students may not be enrolled in correspondence course work the semester they intend to graduate.

 

COLLEGE OF BASIC SCIENCES - UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES

Departments

Curricula

Degrees

Biological Sciences

Biochemistry; Biological Sciences; Microbiology

Bachelor

of

Science

Chemistry

Chemistry

Computer Science

Computer Science

Geology & Geophysics

Geology

Bachelor of Science

in

Geology

Physics & Astronomy

Physics

Bachelor of Science

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS OF THE COLLEGE

The college offers the bachelor's degree in several curricula designed to give students a thorough education in a particular scientific discipline. In addition, a core of material representing a broad exposure to the human cultural heritage is an integral part of the curricula in the college. That core consists of the following course work.

English - Nine semester hours including the second freshman composition course (ENGL 1002 or the equivalent) and six hours chosen from English courses on the general education humanities list or Honors 2002, 2004, 3001, 3003. Degree credit will not be allowed for ENGL 1000/1001 or 1004.

Mathematics - A minimum of five semester hours of calculus (Mathematics 1550). Some curricula require additional credits in mathematics. Degree credit will not be allowed for mathematics courses numbered below 1550.

Foreign Language - Students may satisfy the college foreign language requirement by passing 8 to 10 semester hours in a single foreign language. Ordinarily, courses numbered 1001 and 1002, or 1101 and 1102, or 1001 and 2051 are chosen. For example, students choosing Latin will take LATN 1001 and 2051 (10 semester hours), but students choosing French will take FREN 1001 and 1002 (eight semester hours) and the additional two semester hours will be added to free electives.

International students whose native language is not English and who did not attend an English-speaking high school may satisfy the foreign language requirement as follows:

As shown above (in a language other than the student's native language); or
By passing nine hours in his or her native language in courses that may be taken for credit by native speakers of the language; or
By passing nine hours in other humanities or social sciences courses pre-approved by the dean. At least three hours must be at the 2000 level or above. These nine hours must be taken at LSU. Courses specifically for international students (such as COMD 1051 and SOCL 1005) may not be used.

Sciences - Seventeen hours including two semesters of study in the biological sciences, a course in computer science (programming), and a year-course in a physical science. Either the biological or physical sciences must include laboratory credits. Courses selected to meet this requirement must be chosen from courses offered by departments in the College of Basic Sciences.

Social Sciences and Humanities - Fifteen semester hours in most curricula of the college. These hours are in addition to the English and foreign language requirements described above. Twelve hours of the required social sciences/humanities courses must be chosen from the list of general education courses in the following way: three hours in the arts, three hours in the humanities, and six hours in the social sciences.

Following is a listing of the more important academic policies of the college offered to guide students toward degrees.

All students must complete a program of study established by the department concerned and approved by the faculty and the dean of the college.
No curriculum in the college requires less than 128 semester hours; some curricula require more. Students in all degree programs of the college must earn at least 24 of the last 30 semester hours offered toward their degrees as registrants in the College of Basic Sciences at LSU. The University requires that all candidates for the bachelor's degree must fulfill a minimum residence requirement of two semesters (or four summer terms) and must earn at least 25 percent of the total number of hours required for the degree at this University (all System campuses).
Students in all degree programs of the college must earn in residence on the LSU campus (Baton Rouge) at least 18 of the hours offered toward their degrees in courses offered by departments in the College of Basic Sciences. In all degree programs, at least nine of these 18 hours must be in courses numbered above 3000 and offered by the department administering the major program. Students majoring in the Biological Sciences Department must have nine semester hours in courses numbered above 3000 in their major. Research courses cannot be used in the residence requirement of nine hours numbered above 3000. Courses used to satisfy these residence requirements must be passed with a grade of "C" or better.
Correspondence courses and courses in which credit was earned through credit examination may not be used to satisfy the college residence requirement. A maximum of 3 semester hours in research courses may be used in the 18-hour residence requirement.
The following courses must be passed with a grade of "C" or better: (1) all required science, computer science, and mathematics courses; (2) all restricted, option, and advanced sciences electives; and (3) English 1002, 1003, or 1005. If a student makes a "D" or "F" in a course requiring a "C," the course must be taken and not dropped the next semester the student is in residence and the course is offered.
Nonparticipation courses in kinesiology may be taken for elective credit. A maximum of three semester hours will be allowed in kinesiology participation (activity) courses. Twelve semester hours of ROTC may be allowed for degree credit, with no more than six of the twelve semester hours in courses numbered below 3000. However, the sum of basic (1000-2000 level) ROTC course credits and kinesiology activity course credits allowed toward the degree may not exceed six semester hours.
Students are expected to make reasonable and satisfactory progress in a degree program. Consequently, sequential scheduling of courses in the major field is necessary, and required courses in English and mathematics must be scheduled each semester until they are satisfactorily passed. If necessary, a required course may be dropped once, but normally, not a second time.
Application for the bachelor's degree must be made in writing and approved by the dean of the college during the semester prior to the semester in which the degree is to be awarded.

MINOR FIELD REQUIREMENTS (OPTIONAL)

A student in the College of Basic Sciences may earn a minor in a second field under the following conditions:

The minor must include at least 15 semester hours of course work, of which at least six semester hours must be taken on this campus and at least three of the six hours must be at the 3000 or 4000 level.
Each course used in the minor must be passed with a grade of "C" or better.
Courses used for the minor may not be taken on a pass/fail basis.
All minors must be approved by the dean.

The department offering the minor may impose additional requirements; the specific requirements of the department must be stated in the catalog.

Students in other colleges who wish to obtain a minor in one of the departments of the College of Basic Sciences must meet the same requirements listed above.

COLLEGE PROBATION

A student in the College of Basic Sciences who fails to earn a 2.00 semester average in a regular semester or a summer term will be placed on college probation. Similarly, a student who is admitted to the college with deficiencies may be placed on college probation. At the discretion of the dean, a student who is on college probation and who does not earn a 2.00 or better semester average in the following semester may be declared ineligible to continue in the college. A student on college probation who does earn a 2.00 or better semester grade point average, who remediates course deficiencies, and who makes satisfactory progress in the degree program will be removed from college probation.

PREMEDICAL AND PREDENTAL COUNSELING

Counselors are available to help students with applications to medical and dental schools. This application process begins one and one-half years prior to professional school entry. Students are strongly advised to attend one of the premedical/predental information meetings concerning the professional school application process in the fall of the junior year.

Students with a 3.00 gpa who have been enrolled as full-time students for at least one year at LSU-Baton Rouge prior to making application to medical or dental school are eligible to use the LSU Premedical/Predental Committee. The deadline for using the LSU Premedical/Predental Committee is June 15. Information about using the committee may be obtained in the Deanís office, 338 Choppin Hall, or by attending the Premedical/Predental Information meeting held in the fall semester.

HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE TEACHERS

For a student interested in becoming a high school teacher, it is possible to be certified to teach in a science field by first obtaining a bachelor's degree in that field and then completing a master's degree in the College of Education. The master's degree program begins in June and requires 15 months of intensive graduate course work and classroom experience. There is a second method for a person with a bachelor's degree in science to become certified as a high school science teacheróthe alternative certification program. The alternative certification program requires at least 30 semester hours of credit (including 12 semester hours of student teaching) beyond the B.S. degree and does not lead to an additional degree. A third method is for a student to enroll in the secondary education curriculum in the College of Education with a concentration in a science area. For more information, contact the Office of Student Services in the College of Education, 236 Peabody Hall, 225/388-2331, or e-mail edinfo@asterix.ednet.lsu.edu.

ENROLLMENT IN TWO DEGREE PROGRAMS

With the dean's approval, a student may be enrolled in two degree programs concurrently. A student can enroll as a dual registrant using one of the following procedures:

Dual Enrollment Within the College of Basic SciencesóBy completing residence and academic requirements for two degree programs, a student may earn one bachelor of science degree with two majors. By completing residence and academic requirements, and earning 30 hours over the degree requiring the fewer number of hours, a student will earn two separate bachelor's degrees.
Dual enrollment in the College of Basic Sciences and a Second Academic CollegeóBy completing residence and academic requirements for two degree programs and earning 30 hours more than the degree requiring the fewer number of hours, a student can earn two bachelor's degrees. The student must be accepted for admission to both colleges and must adhere to the regulations of both colleges. In addition, the student must declare a home college where registration will be initiated and permanent files maintained. It is the student's responsibility, however, to maintain contact with the second college to ensure that satisfactory progress is being made toward that degree.

PASS-FAIL OPTION

Students in the College of Basic Sciences may register for courses in the college on a pass-fail basis under the following conditions:

Only students with a 2.50 average or better may participate.
Only free elective courses may be taken on a pass-fail basis. Required courses, restricted electives, and courses germane to the major and the career for which the student is preparing may not be taken on a pass-fail basis. Registration for a course on a pass-fail basis will not be permitted until the required work in the same area has been satisfactorily completed. A student may not take courses offered by the Honors College on a pass-fail basis.
Eligible students may take one course per semester up to a total of 12 hours toward the degree on a pass-fail basis.
A student must have permission (by signatures on a petition form) from the dean of this college, the instructor of the course, and the student's department chair.
Pass-fail registration must be completed before the final day for adding courses.

Students from other colleges who wish to register for courses in this college on a pass-fail basis will present a petition form to the dean of the college. If the petition is approved, the student will then present the form to the instructor concerned for the appropriate action.

Courses offered by the College of Basic Sciences that are required in a student's curriculum or are normally considered important in preparation for the student's career will not be approved on a pass-fail basis.

PHI BETA KAPPA

Seniors and juniors with grade-point averages of at least 3.50 and 3.90, respectively, are considered for membership in Phi Beta Kappa, the oldest scholastic honor society in the United States. Excellence in a variety of intellectual disciplines, rather than proficiency in a single field of study, is the major criterion for election.

The academic record should include satisfactory completion of the general education requirement, including two courses in English or American literature (preferably two of the following: ENGL 3020, 3022, 3070 or 3072), or literature in a foreign language (if not the major field); six-hour sequences in both a life science and a physical science, with an additional two hours of related laboratory work in one of these fields; upper division courses (3000 level or above) in at least two different humanities or social sciences outside the major; and electives that show a commitment to a liberal education.

Sophomores and juniors with high grade-point averages should consult with Phi Beta Kappa officers or college counselors for more specific information.

PHI KAPPA PHI

Phi Kappa Phi, a national scholastic honor society founded in 1897, now contains 282 chapters nationwide. It is one of the most prestigious scholastic honor societies in the U.S. The LSU chapter was founded in 1930 as the 43rd chapter in the nation. At the present time, the national office is located on this campus in the French House.

The primary objectives of Phi Kappa Phi are to promote the pursuit of excellence in higher education and to recognize outstanding achievement by students and faculty through election to membership and through various awards and fellowships. Phi Kappa Phi is unique because it recognizes superior scholarship in all academic fields, rather than restricting membership to a limited field. Juniors in the top five percent and seniors and graduate students in the top ten percent of their classes may be invited to become members of Phi Kappa Phi. New LSU Phi Kappa Phi members are initiated and honored in the spring semester each year and wear identifying ribbons on their academic gowns at commencement exercises.

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM

Please see the section "Career Services" in the "Student - University Services" section of this catalog.

DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
INTERIM CHAIR - Bricker, Moreland Family Professor of Basic Sciences
OFFICE - 508 Life Sciences Building
TELEPHONE - 225/388-2601
FAX - 225/388-2597

BOYD PROFESSORS - Blackwell, Pryor
BOYD PROFESSOR EMERITA - Tucker
ALUMNI PROFESSOR EMERITUS - Socolofsky
PROFESSORS EMERITI - Fischer, Lee, Meier, Srinivasan, Woodring, Younathan
MARY LOU APPLEWHITE PROFESSOR - Moroney
GEORGE C. KENT ENDOWED PROFESSORS - Caprio, Fleeger, Lynn
MORELAND FAMILY PROFESSOR OF BASIC SCIENCES - Bricker
PROFESSORS - Blackwell, Braymer, Bricker, Brown, Caprio, Chang, Chapman, Dietz, Fleeger, Foltz, Hafner, Hales, Homberger, Laine, J. M. Larkin, Lynn, Moore, Moroney, Platt, Pryor, Siebeling, Siebenaller, Silverman, Stickle, Weidner, Williamson
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS - Achberger, Bartlett, Battista, Biel, Bruch, Carman, Denslow, DiMario, Gayda, Longstreth, Morden, Orlowski, Shih, Urbatsch
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS - Ding, Gleason, Grove, Hellberg, Jarosik, J. C. Larkin, LiCata, Noor, Pettis, Rainey, Ramcharan, Rogers, Stephens, Thomas, Waldrop, Wischusen
INSTRUCTORS - Farrar, Hawkins, Jolissaint, Meiers, Pomarico, Schussler, Tamplin, Thompson, Ward-Rainey
ADJUNCT FACULTY - Adams, Carlton, Dagg, Fitzsimons, Gilbertson, Harris, Henk, Kousoulas, LaRock, Lyon, Mendelssohn, Moser, Murai, Mynatt, Pollock, Prowell, Remsen, Sheldon, Smith, Williams, Wilson, Winston, York

The Department of Biological Sciences offers a comprehensive background in biology for teacher preparation, graduate studies, and for professional programs in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and veterinary medicine. This year, for the first time, the department offers a new bachelor of science degree in biological sciences. The department also offers bachelor of science degrees in biochemistry and microbiology. All three degrees require a core of departmental courses that include BIOL 1201, 1202, 1208, 1209, 2051, 2153, and either 4087 or 4093 and 4094. In addition, all students are required to take 20 hours of electives from courses numbered 3000 and above in biological sciences that include two courses with laboratories and at least one course form three of four departmental groupings (described below). Student seeking the bachelor of science degree in biological sciences may fulfill the requirement for 20 hours of electives with courses from all areas of the department while students seeking the other degrees take courses specific to those degrees. Student may earn more than one degree in the department but biological science courses numbered 3000 and above (excluding the core biochemistry courses) may only be applied to one degree. Majors in the department are ineligible for departmental minors.

CURRICULUM IN BIOCHEMISTRY

TOTAL SEM. HRS. - 129

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 1201, 1208, 1202, 1209

8

Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212

8

English 1002

3

Mathematics 1550, 1552

10

General education arts course

332

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 2390

1

Biological Sciences 2051, 2153

8

Chemistry 2001, 2002, 2261, 2262, 2364

12

Physics 2001, 2002, 2108, 2109

8

General education social sciences course

3

 

32

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 4001, 4093, 4094

9

Approved biochemistry elective

3

Computer Science 1248 or 1250 or 2262

3

Foreign language courses

8-10

Six hrs. chosen from 2000-level and above general education English/humanities courses or Honors 2002, 2004, 3001, 3003

6

Approved electives

3-1

 

32

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 4385, 4450

6

Approved biochemistry electives

9

General education social sciences course

3

Social science/humanities courses

6

Approved electives

9

 

33

 

Approved biochemistry electives must come from the following list, must include at least one laboratory course, and must include at least one course form each group:

Group 1: BIOL 4595, 4596; CHEM 4552, 4561, 4562, 4563, 4564.
Group 2: BIOL 3060, 3090, 3156, 4110, 4121, 4132, 4157, 4158, 4160, 4177, 4246, 4400.
Group 3: Ecology and Evolution course or Organismal Diversity course (list of acceptable course or courses can be obtained from the Department of Biological Sciences). BIOL 3999 can also be taken as a biochemistry elective but does not count as a laboratory course.

CURRICULUM IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

TOTAL SEM. HRS. - 128

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological sciences 1201, 1208, 1202, 1209

8

Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212

8

English 1002

3

Mathematics 1550

5

General education arts course

3

Approved electives

5

 

32

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 2051, 2153

8

Chemistry 2261, 2262, 2364

8

Six hrs. chosen from 2000-level and above general education English/humanities courses or Honors 2002, 2004, 3001, 3003

6

Foreign language courses

8-10

Approved electives

2-0

 

32

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM HRS.

Biological Sciences 4087 or 4093 and 4094

4-6

Approved biological sciences electives

6-9

Physics 2001, 2002, 2108, 2109

8

Computer science programming course

3

General education social sciences courses

6

Approved electives

5-0

 

32

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Approved biological sciences electives

11-14

Social sciences/humanities courses

6

Approved electives

15-12

 

32

 

Approved biological sciences electives (20 hrs. required) are BIOL courses numbered 3000 and higher and must include two courses with laboratories (excluding independent research BIOL 3901, 3950, 3951, 3998, 3999). Further, biological sciences electives must include at least one course from three of the following areas: 1) molecular and cellular biology; 2) physiology, anatomy, and development; 3) ecology and evolution; and 4) organismal diversity. A listing of courses for each area may be obtained from the Department of Biological Sciences.

Area of Concentration

> Marine Biology (18-19 hrs.)

Students may obtain an area of concentration in Marine Biology by meeting the requirements of the biological sciences degree, incorporating the following courses into their program of study.

Required courses (18-19 hrs.) OCS 1005; BIOL 4052 or 4090; and 12 hrs. chosen from BIOL 3040, 3041, 4020, 4145, 4149, 4154, 4155, 4156, 4253, 4254, 4262, 4263, 4308, 4600, and 4653.

CURRICULUM IN MICROBIOLOGY

TOTAL SEM HRS. - 128

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 1201, 1208, 1202, 1209

8

Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212

8

English 1002

3

Mathematics 1550

5

General education arts course

3

Approved electives

5

 

32

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 2051, 2153

8

Chemistry 2261, 2262

6

Computer science programming course

3

Six hrs. chosen from 2000-level and above general education English/humanities courses or Honors 2002, 2004, 3001, 3003

6

Foreign language courses

8-10

Approved electives

2-0

 

33

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Chemistry 2001, 2364

4

Physics 2001, 2002, 2108, 2109

8

Biological Sciences 4110

3

Approved microbiology electives (BIOL 4121 and 4246 are suggested for premedical and predental students)

7

General education social sciences courses

6

Approved electives

3

 

31

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Chemistry 2002

2

Biological Sciences 4125 or 4054

3-4

Biological Sciences 4087 or 4093 and 4094

4-6

Approved microbiology electives (BIOL 4122, or 4190 are suggested for premedical and predental students)

3-4

Social sciences/humanities course

6

Approved electives

14-10

 

32

 

Approved microbiology electives must be taken from the following list and must include at least two laboratory courses: BIOL 3115, 3998 (does not count as a laboratory course), 4090, 4111, 4121, 4122, 4132, 4147, 4162, 4163, 4190, 4200, 4246, 4256, 4261, 4385.

An undergraduate minor in microbiology is available. Required courses are BIOL 2051 and 11 additional semester hours of microbiology (excluding BIOL 3800 and 3998) at the 3000 level or above, of which at least three hours must be at the 4000 level (total of 15 hours).

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY
CHAIR - Hales, Professor
OFFICE - 232 Choppin Hall
TELEPHONE - 225/388-3361
FAX - 225/388-3458

BOYD PROFESSOR - Pryor
BOYD PROFESSOR EMERITUS - McGlynn
PROFESSOR EMERITUS - Fischer
ALUMNI PROFESSORS - Cartledge, Daly
PATRICK F. TAYLOR CHAIR IN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE - Dellinger
PHILIP W. AND FOYMAE KELSO WEST PROFESSOR - Stanley
PHILIP WEST CHAIR IN AIR QUALITY, ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY - Warner
PROFESSORS - Butler, Cartledge, Daly, Dellinger, Gale, Hales, Jelinski, Kestner, Maverick, Poliakoff, Pryor, Russo, Stanley, Warner, Wharton
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS - Crowe, Hall, Hammer, Hopkins, McCarley, McLaughlin, Soper, Watkins
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS - Limbach, Spivak, Strongin, Thomas
INSTRUCTORS - Allen, Graves, Hogan, Kolniak, Lyon, Nauman, Reese
ADJUNCT FACULTY - Barkley, Bricker, Cramer, Hormes, Laine, Licata, Means, Negulescu, Overton, Radosz, Scott, Stockbauer

Through two concentrations offered by this department, students obtain a thorough working knowledge of the fundamentals of the various branches of chemistry, supplemented by study in physics, mathematics, and other sciences. Both concentrations are further enriched by the requirement of a broad basic background in the social sciences and humanities. The department offers special lecture and laboratory courses (or special sections of courses) for its majors.

The chemistry concentration prepares students for a professional career or for graduate study in chemistry. Students who complete this concentration are certified as chemists by the American Chemical Society at the time of their graduation. The chemistry and a second discipline concentration allows students to develop their interests and abilities in another discipline outside chemistry. Students may choose second disciplines such as computer science, biological sciences, geology, engineering, business administration, ecology, history, foreign languages, oceanography and coastal sciences, political science, and sociology.

An undergraduate minor in chemistry is available. Requirements are a minimum of 20 semester hours of chemistry, including at least two laboratory courses and at least three semester hours at the 3000 or 4000 level, but excluding Chemistry 3900.

CURRICULUM IN CHEMISTRY

TOTAL SEM. HRS. - 136

With the dean's approval, Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212 may be substituted for Chemistry 1421, 1422, 1431; and Chemistry 2261 and 2262 may be substituted for Chemistry 2461 and 2462.

*Does not have to be a sequence; at least three hours must be from the general education list, but Biological Sciences 1011 may not be used.

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Chemistry 1201 or 1421; 1422; 1431

8

English 1002

3

Mathematics 1550, 1552

10

Foreign language courses

8-10

Approved electives

5-3

 

34

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Chemistry 2001, 2003, 2461, 2462, 2463

12

Computer science programming course

3

Physics 2101, 2102, 2108, 2109

8

General education arts course

3

Area of concentration courses

6-3

Approved electives

3-6

 

35

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Chemistry 3491, 3492, 3493

9

Six hrs. chosen from English courses on the general education humanities list or Honors 2002, 2004, 3001, 3003

6

Biological sciences courses*

6-8

General education social sciences courses

6

Area of concentration courses

6

Approved electives

2-0

 

35

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Chemistry 4552, 4553, 4570

7

Chemistry 3900

2

General education humanities course

3

Social sciences/humanities elective

3

Area of concentration courses

12

Approved electives

5

 

32

 

Area of Concentration

> Chemistry (21-22 hrs.)

Recommended for preparation as a chemical professional or for entrance to graduate study in chemistry. Students completing this concentration will receive American Chemical Society certification.

Sophomore Year - MATH 2065 or 2085 or 2090 (3-4 sem. hrs.).

Junior Year - CHEM 4581 or PHYS 2221 (3 sem. hrs.); MATH 2057 or an advanced physics course numbered above 2111 (3 sem. hrs.).

Senior Year - CHEM 4564 and 6 sem. hrs. of approved chemistry electives representing two areas of chemistry selected from CHEM 3900, 4160, 4551, 4561, 4562, 4571, 4594, 4595, 4596, 4597, and BIOL 4093; and 3 semester hours of physics chosen from PHYS 2221, 2231, 4132, 4135, 4141, and 4142.

> Chemistry and a Second Discipline (24 hrs.)

An approved concentration consists of at least 24 sem. hrs. of electives in one area outside of the Department of Chemistry. Any area may be chosen, with approval of the department advisor and the dean, provided that education in depth is planned through the concentration. The approved concentration form must be submitted no later than the sophomore year.

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE
CHAIR - Iyengar, Professor
OFFICE - 298 Coates Hall
TELEPHONE - 225/388-1495
FAX - 225/388-1465

CRAY RESEARCH CHAIRED PROFESSOR OF COMPUTATIONAL METHODS - Vashishta
LSU FOUNDATION MURPHY J. FOSTER PROFESSOR - P. Chen
PROFESSORS - Carver, P. Chen, Iyengar, Jones, Kalia, Kraft, Tyler, Vashishta
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS - J. Chen, Kundu, Nakano, Sun
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR - Seidan
INSTRUCTORS - Brener, Cuellar, Dacus, Douglas, Edgeworth, Guillott, Gwee, Hoffman, Pinnepali, Traxler

The undergraduate computer science curriculum is structured around basic courses in computer science and mathematics. Students are expected to schedule, via a 15-hour restricted elective group, enough courses in a second area to provide them with a basic understanding of the principles of that area.

The curriculum prepares students for graduate studies or for careers in computer science. A broad background in the humanities and the social sciences is required. The curriculum also provides the student with electives to pursue other interests.

The computer science curriculum includes 15 semester hours of restricted electives that constitute a second area of study. Any second area may be chosen, with consent of the department and the college dean, provided that an in-depth study is planned. Courses in the second area are to form a coherent sequence; all courses must be taken from a single department, and where possible, students should take courses required of a major in that department. Ordinarily, there should be at least two courses numbered 3000 or above in the second area, and computer science courses cannot be included. If ISDS is chosen as the second area, the student must take IE 3302 or ISDS 4000 or MATH 4055, rather than ISDS 2000 and 2001.

Computer science students will not receive degree credit for the following courses: CSC 4602; ELRC 4006; EXST 2000, 2095, 2201, 3001, 4001; PSYC 2011, 4111; ISDS 3001, 3002; and SOCL 2201. Computer science students may not receive credit for both IE 3302 and ISDS 2000, or for both IE 4510 and ISDS 2001.

An undergraduate minor in computer science is available. Required courses are CSC 1250 or 1253, 1251 or 1254, 2252, 2259, 3102, 2262 or 2280; and 4101 or 4103 (total of 21-22 hours).

CURRICULUM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

TOTAL SEM. HRS. - 133

Restricted electives must consist of 15 semester hours in an approved second area. Any second area may be chosen, with the consent of the department and the college dean, provided that an in-depth education is planned. The approved area form must be submitted no later than the sophomore year.

The computer science senior elective (three semester hours) must be an approved, senior-level computer science course.

*Three hours must be from the general education natural sciences.

**Students who have completed the prerequisites may substitute ME 4533.

***Students who have completed the prerequisites may substitute MATH 4055 or ISDS 4000.

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Computer Science 1100, 1250, 1251

9

English 1002

3

Mathematics 1550, 1552

10

Biological or physical sciences sequence*

6

General education arts course

3

General education speech course

3

 

34

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Computer Science 2252, 2259, 2280, 2290

13

Six hrs. chosen from English courses on the general education humanities list or Honors 2002, 2004, 3001, 3003

6

Mathematics 2090

4

General education biological or physical sciences sequence with lab

8

General education social sciences course

3

 

34

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Computer Science 2262,** 4101

6

Computer science electives 2000-level or above

3

Computer Science 3102

3

Foreign language courses

8-10

Industrial Engineering 3302***

3

General education social sciences course

3

Approved elective

5-3

Restricted elective

3

 

34

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Computer science 4103, 4330, and computer science senior elective

9

Restricted electives

12

Social sciences/humanities course

3

Approved electives

7

 

31

 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS
CHAIR - Ellwood, Professor
OFFICE - E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex
TELEPHONE - 225/388-3353
FAX - 225/388-2302

FRANK AND PATRICIA HARRISON ALUMNI PROFESSOR - Hanor
CAMPANILE CHARITIES PROFESSOR - Hazel
CHARLES T. McCORD, JR., CHAIR IN PETROLEUM GEOLOGY - Bouma
ADOLPHE GUEYMARD PROFESSOR - Dokka
PROFESSORS EMERITI - Andersen, Hart, Kupfer, Moore, Van den Bold
PROFESSORS - Aharon, Baksi, Bouma, Byerly, Chan, Dokka, Ellwood, Ferrell, Hanor, Hazel, Henry, Nunn, Roche, Sen Gupta
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS - Anderson, Dutrow, Lorenzo, Wrenn
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS - Bart, Horton
ADJUNCT FACULTY - Coleman, Hamilton, Nummedal, Roberts, Schiebout

The geology curriculum prepares undergraduates for graduate study in geology and geophysics and related fields and for a wide range of professional careers, including teaching, research, resource exploration and development, and environmental management and remediation. The curriculum has two areas of concentration: geology and environmental geology.

All geology students follow the same basic curriculum during the first five semesters of study. Students during this time receive a firm foundation in mineralogy, petrology, structural geology, and sedimentology, as well as basic courses in biology, computer science, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. Emphasis is on fundamental geologic processes operating on and within the earth. Laboratory and field studies are integrated into the curriculum at all levels and include a six-week field geology course at the Department's permanent field camp in the Colorado Front Range.

The curriculum is designed to leave much of the final three semesters of study relatively unstructured so that students, with the guidance and approval of the department can develop a program of advanced course work most appropriate to their career objectives. Students selecting the geology area of concentration take, in addition to the first five semester group of courses, paleontology, a basic course in either geophysics, geochemistry or tectonics, and six hours of geology electives. Students selecting the environmental geology area of concentration take physical hydrogeology, nine hours of approved environmental geology electives, and nine hours of approved electives in chemistry, mathematics, and other disciplines relevant to environmental problems. Both areas of concentration are designed to provide students with a sound foundation in basic geology and to prepare them for entry into a graduate program or directly into a professional career.

Graduate and undergraduate majors in geology must pay a $35 field service fee each semester. Students not majoring in geology who schedule courses requiring field trip fees will be assessed a pro rata part of the amount above as determined by the department chair. Part-time students enrolled in seminar courses only and students registered for thesis or dissertation only are exempt from the fee. Additional information concerning fees for field geology courses is available from the Geology Field Camp Director, Department of Geology and Geophysics.

An undergraduate minor in geology is available (17-19 hrs.). Required courses are GEOL 1001, 1003, 1601, 1602; plus one of the following concentrations:

Geochemistry/Petrology: GEOL 2081, 2082, plus one course chosen from 4081, 4082, and 4083. (Suggested for, but not limited to chemistry or environmental sciences majors.)
Sedimentology/Paleontology: GEOL 3011, 3032, and 4012 or 4031. (Suggested for life sciences or environmental sciences majors.)
Geophysics/Structural Geology: GEOL 2071, plus two courses chosen from 4064, 4066, 4067, 4071, and 4098. (Suggested for physics majors.)

Honors courses offered are Geology 1002 and 1004.

CURRICULUM IN GEOLOGY

TOTAL SEM. HRS. - 128

* See area requirements.

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212

8

English 1002

3

Geology 1001, 1003, 1601, 1602

8

Mathematics 1550, 1552

10

General education arts course

3

 

32

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 1201

3

Computer science course*

3

Six hrs. chosen from English courses on the general education humanities list or Honors 2002, 2004, 3001, 3003

6

Geology 2071, 2081, 2082

10

General education humanities course

3

General education social sciences courses

6

 

31

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Geology 3032, 3041

6

Physics 2101, 2102, 2108, 2109

8

Biological Sciences 1502

3

Foreign language courses

8-10

Area of concentration courses

4-3

Approved electives

3-2

 

32

 

SUMMER

(FOLLOWING JUNIOR YEAR)

SEM. HRS.

Geology 3666

6

 

6

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Area of concentration courses

9-18

Approved electives

18-9

 

27

 

Areas of Concentration

> Geology

Required Courses (16 hrs.): Computer Science programming course;* GEOL 3011; nine hours of 4000-level geology electives, of which at least one course must be chosen from GEOL 4064, 4066, 4067, 4071, 4081, 4082, 4083, 4085, 4098.

> Environmental Geology

Required Courses (24 hrs.): CSC 1253 or 2262;* GEOL 4182; approved environmental geology electives (9 hrs.); approved area electives (9 hrs.).

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY
CHAIR - Metcalf, Professor
OFFICE - 202 Nicholson Hall
TELEPHONE - 225/388-2261
FAX - 225/388-5855

BOYD PROFESSOR - O'Connell
PROFESSOR EMERITUS - Hussey
DEMARCUS D. SMITH ALUMNI PROFESSOR - Zganjar
CRAY RESEARCH CHAIRED PROFESSOR OF COMPUTATIONAL METHODS - Vashishta
PROFESSORS - Adams, Browne, Chan, Cherry, Draayer, Drilling, Frank, Goodrich, Guzik, Hamilton, Haymaker, Imlay, Kalia, Kirk, D. Kirwan, Kurtz, Landolt, McNeil, Metcalf, O'Connell, Rau, Stockbauer, Svoboda, Tohline, Vashishta, Wefel, Williams, Zganjar
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS - Clayton, DiTusa, W. Johnson, Matthews, Sajo, Schafer
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS - Giaime, C. Johnson, Kim, Stacy
INSTRUCTORS - Giammanco, Gregg, G. Kirwan, Slovak
ADJUNCT FACULTY - Coles, Grauer, Hall, Hidalgo-Salvatierra, Johnson, Lee, Lowndes, Moewes, Poliakoff, Rizzi, Scott, Sprunger

An undergraduate minor in physics is available. Required courses are PHYS 1201, 1202, 1208, 1209, (or PHYS 2101, 2102, 2108, 2109); PHYS 2221; and at least three courses in physics above 2200 (excluding PHYS 2401, 2995, 4399, and 4991) of which at least three hours must be at the 4000 level, and/or astronomy above 4000 (excluding ASTR 4997), for a total of 20-22 hours.

Undergraduate students majoring in science or engineering in any institute, school, or college on this campus may choose to minor in nuclear science. The following conditions must be met:

At least 15 credit hours in nuclear science courses, 12 of which must be taken on this campus from the following: NS 2051, 3411, 4101, 4141, 4331, 4527, 4566, 4570, 4991, 4992, AND 4995.
An undergraduate grade point average of 2.00 for the minor field.
No courses taken on a pass/fail basis may be applied toward the minor.

The Department of Physics and Astronomy offers dual masterís degrees for medical physics studies. For additional information, see the section, "Graduate School and Professional Programs" in this catalog.

CURRICULUM IN PHYSICS

TOTAL SEM. HRS. - 130

Students planning to enter graduate school are encouraged to select a modern foreign language.

*Does not have to be a sequence; at least three hours must be from the general education list, but BIOL 1011 may not be used.

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

English 1002

3

Mathematics 1550, 1552

10

Physics 1201, 1202, 1208, 1209

10

General education arts course

3

Area of concentration courses

6

 

32

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Six hrs. chosen from English courses on the general education humanities list or Honors 2002, 2004, 3001, 3003

6

Mathematics 2057

3

Physics 2203, 2207, 2221

7

Biological sciences courses*

6

Computer science programming course

3

General education humanities course

3

Area of concentration courses

4

 

32

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Foreign language courses

8-10

Physics 2231, 2411, 4098, 4132

12

Area of concentration courses

6

General education social sciences courses

6

Approved electives

2-0

 

34

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Area of concentration courses

12

Physics 4125

3

Social sciences/humanities course

3

Approved electives

14

 

32

 

Areas of Concentration

> Physics

Required Courses (28 hrs.) - CHEM 1201, 1202; MATH 2090; PHYS 4123, 4141, 4142, 4399, and two physics electives (4000 level or above)ówith permission, a 4000-level mathematics course may be substituted for one.

> Astronomy

Required Courses (28 hrs.) - ASTR 1101, 1102, 4221, 4222, 4261; MATH 2090; PHYS 4123, 4135, 4141.

> Physics and a Second Discipline

Required Courses (28 hrs.) - MATH 2090; at least 24 sem. hrs. from an approved discipline outside of the Department of Physics and Astronomy; any second area may be chosen with consent of the dean and department adviser. The approved area form must be submitted no later than the sophomore year.

> Physics/Secondary Education Area

Freshman Year (33 hrs.) - Astronomy 1101, 1102, 1108, 1109; Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212; English 1002; Mathematics 1550; General education arts course; area of concentration courses (6).

Sophomore Year (35 hrs.) - Biological Sciences 1201, 1208, 1502, 1509 or 1402; English 3020, 3022, 2025, 2027, 3070, 2148, Honors 2002, 3001, 3003 (select two courses); Mathematics 1552, 2057; Physics 1201, 1202, 1208, 1209; General education humanities course.

Junior Year (32 hrs.) - Computer science programming course (3); foreign language courses (8-10); General education social sciences courses (6); area of concentration course (3); Physics 2203, 2207, 2221, 2401; approved elective (2-0).

Senior Year (30 hrs.) - General education social sciences/humanities course (3); area of concentration courses (9); Physics 2231, 2411, 4098; approved electives (9). It is recommended that 18 hours in the area of concentration be chosen to allow certification for teaching in a second area besides physics. Some suggested second areas are: mathematics - MATH 2040, 2065, 2085, 4005; chemistry - CHEM 2001, 2002, 2261, 2262, 2364, BIOL 4087; life sciences - BIOL 2046, 2051, 2055, 2153, 3040, 3041, 3060, 3090, 4253; earth sciences - GEOL 1001, 1003, 1601, 1602, 2020, 2066, 2071, 2081, 3011, 3032; environmental sciences - ENVS 4010, 4261, 4500, NS 4101, 4141, BIOL 4155; general science - ENVS 2144, 4010, GEOL 1001, 1003, 1601, 1602.

 

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