Agriculture


Agriculture
Arts & Sciences
Basic Sciences
Business Administration
Design
Education
Engineering
Honors College
Mass Communication
Music & Dramatic Arts

COLLEGE OF
Agriculture

KENNETH L. KOONCE
Dean

DAVID C. BLOUIN
Associate Dean

JAMES W. TROTT
Associate Dean

JACQUELINE MALLET
Assistant Dean

ARLETTE RODRIGUE
Assistant to the Dean

GERI B. STALEY
Coordinator, Grants and Contracts

CHARLOTTE ROBERTSON
Coordinator, Student Services

PAULA BEECHER
Recruitment Coordinator

124 Agricultural Administration Building
225/388-2362
FAX 225/388-2526

The College of Agriculture was established at LSU in 1908; however, its roots go back to the first graduation class which had as one of its five graduates—a planter. The mission of today's College of Agriculture is one rooted in business, science, and technology. The application of knowledge to meeting the world's food and fiber needs remains the common thread that binds the college's past to its future.

The college's land-grant mission dates to 1862 and consists of three emphases: learning, discovery, and active engagement with the community of which we are a part. The discovery and engagement components of the college's mission are often conducted in con-cert with the LSU Agricultural Center. Many faculty hold joint appointments with the Louisiana Agricultural Experimental Station or the Louisiana Cooperative Extension Service—the research and education units of the LSU Agricultural Center. The interlinking of learning, discovery and engagement are hallmarks of the land-grant system and are likewise the cornerstones of the College of Agriculture's strategic agenda for the future.

The College of Agriculture is home to more that 40 majors and areas of concentration supported by 14 academic departments and schools. All of the programs provide an interdisciplinary educational experience that reflect the latest in science and technology and are built on the six focus areas that are core to the college's strategic agenda.

VISION

To be a leading college of agriculture, taking undergraduate and graduate students to highest levels of intellectual and personal development in the milieu of a competitive research, service, and teaching land-grant university.

MISSION

To provide programs of excellence to educate undergraduate and graduate students of agriculture, environmental sciences, renewable natural resource sciences, human resource sciences, quantitative sciences, and family and consumer sciences; to support and encourage research, public service, and other scholarly pursuits; to further the purposes of the land- grant college system for the benefit of the citizens of Louisiana, the nation, and the global community.

Strategic Agenda

To achieve our mission, the College of Agriculture has developed a strategic agenda focused on six interdisciplinary areas. These areas encompass broad fields of work and are by their content, interdisciplinary and cross many administrative lines both with the college and in other administrative units. In particular, these areas coincide with and closely follow the research and development agenda of the LSU Agricultural Center.

Environmental quality and renewable resource management
Bioscience and technology in agriculture
Processes and products for added value
Agribusiness, consumer science, and global competitiveness
Food quality, nutrition, and health
Human resource development

COORDINATION WITH THE LSU AGRICULTURAL CENTER

The College of Agriculture, in cooperation with the LSU Agricultural Center, offers students unique and unparalleled educational opportunities. The Louisiana Agricultural Experimental Station maintains research programs in Baton Rouge and at branch stations throughout Louisiana. The Louisiana Cooperative Extension Service disseminates knowledge throughout Louisiana through its network of specialists in Baton Rouge and county agents and home economists in every parish. A compressed video system that links all areas of the state greatly facilitates the delivery of educational programming.

Close cooperation between the college and the Agricultural Center provides an instructional program of exceptional quality, combining knowledge and the latest in technology and application. Because many faculty members in the college also hold appointments in the Agricultural Center, students are exposed to the latest in cutting- edge research in the classroom and how that knowledge is disseminated to the field through the extension service.

The College of Agriculture and the Agricultural Center are actively involved in disseminating new knowledge and methods throughout the world. Internationally experienced faculty and staff bring their insights and experiences into the classroom to further enhance the learning experience. An active international program provides opportunities for students to gain valuable international experience that can assist them in future employment or study. The college and the Agricultural Center are currently active in Central and South America, Southeast Asia, West Africa, and countries of the former Soviet Union.

FACILITIES

Facilities for instructional purposes include more than 4,500 acres of farm and timber land and buildings for the care and study of crops, livestock and poultry, and wildlife and forests.

Computer facilities, laboratories, and related research facilities are used for teaching purposes. Land and facilities at branch research stations throughout Louisiana also play a part in the teaching program, particularly at the graduate level. The state's land and water resources; plant, animal, and aquatic life, and its communities and people serve as instructional aids through a constantly changing complex of hundreds of research projects throughout the state that are coordinated with the teaching program. Similarly, research, teaching, and extension activities in foreign countries make those experiences part of the facilities and knowledge available for classroom instruction on campus.

Livestock include purebred herds of Angus, Brahman, and Hereford cattle that are involved in teaching and research studies. Artificial insemination and embryo transfer are used to incorporate current genetics from leading herds in Louisiana and throughout the U.S. Other herds of beef cattle near the campus include breeds and crosses representative of the Southern beef cattle industry. Brahman-British cow herds are bred to either British or heavy muscled terminal sire breads such as Charolais or Belgian Blue bulls to produce a broad range of cattle types for research and teaching purposes. The dairy herd is composed of the Holstein breed. Breeds of sheep include Gulf Coast (Louisiana) Native, Suffolk, and tropically adapted breeds including the Saint Croix and Kathadin breeds. The swine herd is comprised of purebred Yorkshires and a crossbred herd of Yorkshire-Landrace sows that are bread to heavy muscled Hampshire, Duroc, or commercial breeding company hybrid line boars to produce market hogs that are representative of the swine industry. A number of Quarter Horses and grade mares are maintained for research and instruction. The Dairy Improvement Center cooperates with Genex in the operation of a commercial artificial breeding program. Commercial strains of poultry are used in instruction and research.

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE- UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES

Departments/Schools

Curricula

Degrees

Department of Agricultural Economics & Agribusiness

Agricultural Business

Bachelor

of

Science

Department of Agronomy

Environmental Management Systems

Plant & Soil Systems

Department of Animal Science

Animal, Dairy, & Poultry Sciences

Department of Biological & Agricultural Engineering

(See College of Engineering)

Department of Dairy Science

Animal, Dairy, & Poultry Sciences

Department of Entomology

(See "Graduate School- Professional Programs" section.)

Department of Experimental Statistics

(See "Graduate School- Professional Programs" section.)

Department of Food Science

Nutrition, Food, and Culinary Sciences

Department of Horticulture

Plant & Soil Systems

Department of Plant Pathology & Crop Physiology

(See "Graduate School - Professional Programs" section.)

Department of Poultry Science

Animal, Dairy, & Poultry Sciences

School of Human Ecology

Dietetics

Family, Child, & Consumer Sciences

Textiles, Apparel, & Merchandising

School of Vocational Education

Vocational Education

School of Forestry, Wildlife, & Fisheries

Forestry (Forest Management)

Bachelor of Science in Forestry

Wildlife & Fisheries

Bachelor of Science

 

Preveterinary Medicine*

*Preveterinary medicine is not a degree-granting curriculum

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Within the framework of University regulations, students may be admitted to the college according to the following policies:

Any student who has been regularly admitted by Louisiana State University with a declared major in Agriculture will be admitted directly into the College of Agriculture.
Students admitted from University College or any other division of the University must have completed a minimum of 24 semester hours with a 2.00 average on all work taken and have earned a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 1002 and MATH 1020/1021.
Transfer students from accredited colleges and universities who have met the general entrance requirements of the University and who have pursued college courses equivalent to those required of University College students or those in the LCPAC curriculum, may be admitted to the College on the same basis as students entering from other divisions of the University. Transfer credits acceptable for admission purposes shall be valid for degree credit in the College only to the extent to which they represent courses acceptable in the curricula of the College. Transfer students applying for credit in any department or school within the College may be required to take a comprehensive examination before credit is allowed.
On recommendation of the appropriate department head and the dean of the College, probationary admission may be granted in special cases.

SCHOLASTIC REQUIREMENTS

In addition to University requirements, the College of Agriculture has these additional scholastic requirements:

Students who fail to earn a 2.00 average in each of two consecutive semesters (or one semester and a summer term) and whose LSU or overall grade-point average is below a 2.00, will be declared ineligible to continue in the College of Agriculture for one regular semester.
Seniors who have completed the first semester of the senior year, are degree candidates, and are under scholastic suspension from the University, may be placed on probation for one additional semester at the discretion of the dean of the College of Agriculture.

LOUISIANA CONSORTIUM OF PUBLIC AGRICULTURAL COLLEGES

Louisiana State University is a member of the Louisiana Consortium of Public Agricultural Colleges (LCPAC). The consortium has developed a 60-hour, two-year core curriculum to facilitate the transfer of agricultural students among Louisiana public colleges and universities. The articulation policy for the LSU College of Agriculture is shown below.

READMISSION TO THE COLLEGE

Students who have completed terms of scholastic suspension from the University may apply for readmission through the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. They may be readmitted only with the approval of the head of the appropriate department/school and the dean of the College of Agriculture. Readmission is not guaranteed.

LSU COURSE EQUIVALENCIES FOR THE LCPAC CORE

CORE COURSE

HOURS OF CREDIT

LSU COURSE EQUIVALENT

Agriculture (Animal)

3

Animal Science 1011 or Dairy Science 1048 or Poultry Science 1049

Agriculture (Plant)

3

Horticulture 2050 or Agronomy 1051 or 2051

Agriculture (Electives)

2

Any 1000- or 2000-level agricultural course

Art

3

See general education requirements in this catalog.

Biological Sciences

8

Biological Sciences 1201, 1208, 1402, 1502, 1509

Chemistry

8

Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212

Communication

3

Speech Communication 2060

Computer Science

3

Experimental Statistics 2000

Economics

3

Economics 2030

English Composition

6

English 1000/1001, 1002*

English Literature

3

English 3020 or 3022 or 2025 or 2027 or 3070 or 2148

History

3

History 1001 or 1003 or 2001 or 2002 or 2011 or 2012 or 2021 or 2022 or 2055 or 2057

Humanities Electives

3

See general education requirements in this catalog.

Mathematics

6

Mathematics 1020/1021;* 1022 or 1431

Social Sciences Electives

3

See general education requirements in this catalog.

TOTAL HOURS

60

 

* A grade of "C" or higher is required in ENGL 1002 and MATH 1020/1021 to receive an agricultural degree from LSU.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS OF THE COLLEGE

The baccalaureate degree is conferred on students who fulfill the following requirements:

Students must complete their curricula with at least a 2.00 grade-point average on all work taken not resulting in grades of "P," "W," or "I." Students must have a 2.00 average on work taken at this University, as well as a 2.00 average on the entire college record.
The last 30 semester hours of the degree program must be taken in residence in the College of Agriculture. Courses taken through correspondence study in the last 30 hours will not be considered residence credit without prior approval of the department head concerned and the dean of the college.

MINOR FIELD REQUIREMENTS (OPTIONAL)

Students in the College of Agriculture are not required to pursue a minor. They may choose to do so by following the guidelines outlined below.

A minor is the student's field of secondary academic emphasis. A minor consists of a minimum of 18 hours of related course work designed to provide breadth and depth in a student's undergraduate program.
At least nine hours must be taken at the 3000 and/or 4000 level on this campus.
A minimum gpa of 2.00 is required in the minor field on all work taken in the LSU System and on all work taken.
Minors inside the College of Agriculture must be initiated by the department or school administering the majority of the courses constituting the minor. When submitting a minor for approval, the department or school should specify whether their students may elect that minor. All minors must be approved by the college committee on courses and curricula.

The degree program of a student outside the College of Business Administration may not consist of more than 27 hours of degree credit earned in courses offered by the College of Business Administration.

< Agricultural Business

To graduate with a minor in agricultural business, students in the College of Agriculture must complete:

AGEC 1003; 3413; AGEC 3203 or 3213; AGEC 4403; and EXST 2201.
at least six credit hours of approved electives chosen from AGEC 2003, 3003, 3303, 3803, 4213, 4413, 4433, 4443, 4503, 4603; ACCT 2000, 2001, 2021, 2101; ECON 2030, 2035, 4120, 4440, 4520, 4540, 4550, 4720; FIN 3200, 3201, 3351, 3440, 3636, 3715; MGT 3200, 3320, 3500, 4420, 4523, 4620; MKT 3401, 3427, 3431, 3441, 4423; and MATH 1431. Students interested in pursuing the M.S. in agricultural economics should elect MATH 1431 and ECON 4720.

The minor in agricultural business is not available to students majoring in agricultural business or food and resource economics.

< Agriculture for Students in Mass Communication

To graduate with a minor in agriculture, students must complete 18 hours. A minimum of nine hours must be at the 3000 and 4000 level:

AGEC 2003, HUEC 1010, AGRO 1051, HUEC 3061.
Six hours from any course (3000/4000 level) within the College of Agriculture.

This minor is open only to mass communication students.

< Agronomy

To graduate with a minor in agronomy, students in this college complete 18 hours consisting of AGRO 2051, 3000, and two courses chosen from AGRO 3011, 3012, 3013; and nine additional hours chosen from AGRO 3040, 4005, 4052, 4055, 4056, 4058, 4064, 4078, 4080, 4086, 4087, 4091, 4092.

< Animal, Dairy, and Poultry Sciences

To graduate with a minor in animal, dairy, and poultry sciences (18 hrs.), students must complete a minimum of 18 hours of course work in animal, dairy, or poultry sciences with at least nine hours at the 4000 level and maintain a 2.00 average on all work taken. Students majoring in animal, dairy, and poultry sciences may not also minor in this curriculum.

< Applied Statistics

To graduate with a minor in applied statistics, students must complete a minimum of 18 hours of course work consisting of:

Two courses selected from EXST 2000, 2095, 2201; and
EXST 3001, 4001, and 4002.

< Aquaculture

To graduate with a minor in aquaculture (18-19 hrs.), students must complete designated courses in the following categories: fisheries—a minimum of 11 hrs. from FISH 2001, 4021, 4022, 4039; plant taxonomy and ecology—select one from FISH 4020, OCS 4308, BIOL 4052; animal taxonomy—FISH 4145.

< Business Administration

To graduate with a minor in business administration (24-25 hrs.), students in the College of Agriculture must complete ISDS 2000 or EXST 2201; ACCT 2000 or 2001, 2101; ECON 2030, 2035; FIN 3715; MGT 3200; and MKT 3401. (Students interested in pursuing the M.B.A. degree should elect ACCT 2001 and MATH 1431 and 1435. This minor is open to College of Agriculture students only.)

< Entomology

To graduate with a minor in entomology, students must complete a minimum of 18 hours of course work in entomology with at least nine hours at or above the 3000 level. Specific requirements include ENTM 2001 and 4005 and eleven hours from the following: ENTM 2050, 4001, 4006, 4011, 4012, 4015, 4016, 4018, 4099, 4100, and 4199.

< Fisheries

To graduate with a minor in fisheries (20-21 hrs.), students must complete the following courses: fisheries—complete FISH 4021, 4040, 4023, and 4039; plant taxonomy and ecology— select one from FISH 4020, OCS 4308, BIOL 4052; animal taxonomy—FISH 4145.

< Fish and Wildlife Conservation

To graduate with a minor in fish and wildlife conservation (19-23 hrs.), students must complete: fisheries and wildlife— complete both FISH 2001 and WILD 2031; any two from FISH 4021, 4022, 4039, 4040, WILD 4011, 4013, 4035, 4050; environmental studies—ENVS 1000 and any one from ENVS 2144, 4010, 4149; plant and animal biology—any one selected from BIOL 2046, 4041, 4141, 4142, 4146; FISH/WILD 4020; FISH 4145; FOR 3061.

< Forestry

To graduate with a minor in forestry (18 hrs.), students must complete the following: forest biology—FOR 1001, 2001, 3061; silviculture—FOR 3001; forestry electives—select six hours from FOR 4021, 4030, 4032, 4033, 4034, 4035, 4039, 4040, 4064; ENTM/ PLHL 4018. If students have the necessary prerequisites, the following may be taken: FOR 3002, 3004, 4036, 4038.

< Horticulture

To graduate with a minor in horticulture, students in the College of Agriculture must complete HORT 2050, 2061, 2076, and at least three of the following courses: HORT 3000, 3010, 4021, 4051, 4071, 4083, 4085, 4086, 4087, and/or 4096. The minor in horticulture is not available to students majoring in plant and soil systems.

< Nutrition, Food, and Culinary Sciences

To graduate with a minor in nutrition, food, and culinary sciences, students must complete 21-25 hours: (1) HUEC 2010; (2) HUEC/FDSC 2014; (3) HUEC/FDSC 3015; (4) FDSC 4076; (5) FDSC 4162; (6) two additional courses from ANSC 3033, 3053, 4094; DARY 2075, 2085, 4020, 4040, 4081; FDSC 4005, 4050, 4060, 4070, 4095, 4162; HORT 4051, 4096; HUEC 2012, 2018, 3012, 3016, 3019, 3020, 4010, 4011, 4014, 4023; PLSC 4032.

Students must declare the minor area with the academic counselor in the College of Agriculture for the minor to appear on the student's official transcript. Upon completion of the minor area, the student must have a minimum gpa of 2.00 in the minor field on all work taken in the LSU System and on all work taken. This minor is not available to students majoring in nutrition, food, and culinary sciences.

< Rural Sociology

To graduate with a minor in rural sociology, students in the College of Agriculture must complete (1) SOCL 1001 or 2001; (2) SOCL 2351; (3) two of the following: SOCL 4351, 4551, 4701, or 4711; and (4) at least six additional elective hours in sociology. Students interested in pursuing a graduate degree in rural sociology are encouraged to elect SOCL 2211 and 3101.

< Textiles, Apparel, & Merchandising

To graduate with a minor in textiles, apparel, and merchandising, students in the College of Agriculture must complete 11 hours consisting of HUEC 2040, 2041, 2032, 2045; and 9 additional hours chosen from HUEC 3030, 3032, 3041, 3034, 4030 or 4041, 4042. Students must comply with all prerequisites and must achieve a minimum grade of "C" in every course taken in the minor field. This minor is not available to students majoring in textiles, apparel, and merchandising.

< Vocational Education

To graduate with a minor in vocational education, students in the College of Agriculture must complete 18 sem. hrs.: VED 2001, 3200, 4301; 6 hrs. from VED 4504, 4025, 4704, 4705; HEED 4004; EXED 4011; INED 3055, 3062; 3 sem. hrs. chosen from any course offered by the School of Vocational Education.

< Wildlife

To graduate with a minor in wildlife, students must complete the following: (1) Wildlife required courses—9 sem. hrs: WILD 2031, 4045 and 4046, 4050; (2) Wildlife elective—one course selected from the following: WILD 4011, 4013, 4035; (3) Plant Taxonomy—one course selected from the following: FOR 2001, WILD 4020, BIOL 4041, 4055; (4) Animal Taxonomy—one course selected from the following: WILD 3018, BIOL 4141, 4142, 4145, 4146.

This minor is not available to students majoring in the wildlife area of concentration in the wildlife and fisheries curriculum.

CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION CREDIT

Up to one-fourth of the number of hours required for the baccalaureate degree may be taken through the Division of Continuing Education, either through correspondence study or as extension credit or both. Before scheduling such work, however, students should obtain approval from the dean.

ENROLLMENT IN TWO DEGREE PROGRAMS

With the dean's approval, a student may be enrolled in two degree programs concurrently. A student can enroll as a dual registrant using one of the following procedures:

Dual Enrollment within the College of Agriculture—By completing residence and academic requirements for two degree programs, a student may earn one bachelor of science degree with two majors. By completing residence and academic requirements, and earning 30 hours over the degree requiring the fewer number of hours, a students will earn two separate bachelor's degrees.
Dual Enrollment in the College of Agriculture and a Second Academic College—By completing residence and academic requirements for two degree programs and earning 30 hours more than the degree requiring the fewer number of hours, a student can earn two bachelor's degrees. The student must be accepted for admission to both colleges and must adhere to the regulations of both colleges. In addition, the student must declare a home college where registration will be initiated and permanent files maintained. It is the student's responsibility, however, to maintain contact with the second college to ensure that satisfactory progress is being made toward that degree.

PHI KAPPA PHI

Phi Kappa Phi, a national scholastic honor society founded in 1897, now contains 282 chapters nationwide. It is one of the most prestigious scholastic honor societies in the U.S. The LSU chapter was founded in 1930 as the 43rd chapter in the nation. At the present time, the national office is located on this campus in the French House.

The primary objectives of Phi Kappa Phi are to promote the pursuit of excellence in higher education and to recognize outstanding achievement by students and faculty through election to membership and through various awards and fellowships. Phi Kappa Phi is unique because it recognizes superior scholarship in all academic fields, rather than restricting membership to a limited field. Juniors in the top five percent and seniors and graduate students in the top ten percent of their classes may be invited to become members of Phi Kappa Phi. New LSU Phi Kappa Phi members are initiated and honored in the spring semester each year and wear identifying ribbons on their academic gowns at commencement exercises.

GRADUATE PROGRAMS

Through the Graduate School, the College offers master's and doctoral degrees in the fields of agricultural economics, agronomy, animal science, dairy science, entomology, food science, forestry, horticulture, plant pathology, and vocational education. A doctoral degree in wildlife and fisheries science is also offered. In addition, master's degrees are offered in applied statistics, fisheries, human ecology, poultry science, and wildlife. For further details, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

AGRICULTURAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION

The Agricultural Student Association (ASA) consists of all students in the College of Agriculture or any student in University College with a declared major in agriculture. The ASA brings the various student organizations in the College together for cooperative events and serves in an advisory role to the dean of the College. The ASA is governed by the Agricultural Student Council (ASC) which consists of representatives from each student organization in the College and officers who are elected annually.

 

DEPARTMENTS, SCHOOLS, AND CURRICULA

The dean, directors of schools, heads of departments, and members of the faculty of the College will consult with students on their choices of curricula. Requests for substitutions for required courses in all curricula in the College must have approval of the dean, upon recommendation of the head of the department or school. A maximum of six semester hours of basic ROTC and eight semester hours of advanced ROTC may be allowed for elective credit in any curriculum.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AND AGRIBUSINESS
HEAD - Paxton, Professor
OFFICE - 101 Agricultural Administration Building
TELEPHONE - 225/388-3282
FAX - 225/388-2716

WARNER L. BRUNER PROFESSOR- Vandeveer
MARTIN D. WOODIN ENDOWED PROFESSOR OF AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS- Schupp
PROFESSORS EMERITI- Corty, Fielder, Harper, Hudson, Law, Traylor, Wiegmann, Woodin
PROFESSORS- Guedry, Paxton, Schupp, Vandeveer, Zapata
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS- Dellenbarger, Gauthier, Henning, Hinson, Hughes, Kazmierczak, P. Kennedy, Salassi
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS- Bechtel, Gillespie
INSTRUCTOR- Niu
ADJUNCT FACULTY- Hill, G. Kennedy

CURRICULUM:

Agricultural Business

The agricultural business curriculum offered by the Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness provides training for a wide variety of careers in the agribusiness industry. The program integrates the disciplines of business and agricultural business, economics, quantitative methods, and agricultural sciences. Course offerings include courses in agribusiness management, marketing, credit and finance, agricultural production economics, natural resource economics, agricultural policy and law, price analysis, statistics, quantitative methods, and computer applications.

The curriculum in agricultural business emphasizes use of management, marketing, finance, law, and other business principles in the solution of problems in the agribusiness industry. This curriculum provides students with excellent preparation for careers in farm management, agricultural law, commodity trading, sales, marketing, real estate, inter-national trade, insurance, agricultural processing, management, communications, public relations, finance, and appraisal.

Students majoring in curricula offered through other departments in the College of Agriculture may minor in agricultural business. See the listing of the College of Agriculture minors for details.

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS

TOTAL SEM. HRS.- 134

General Education Course Requirements- Arts, humanities, and social sciences— select from approved general education courses listed in a separate section of this catalog.

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Agricultural Economics 1003

3

Biological Sciences 1001, 1002

6

Chemistry 1001, 1002

6

English 1000/1001, 1002

6

Mathematics 1020/1021, 1431

6

College of Agriculture elective

3

Electives or ROTC

3

 

33

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Agricultural Economics 2003

3

Agronomy 2051

4

Economics 2030, 2035

6

English 2002

3

Experimental Statistics 2201

4

Speech Communication 2060, 2061

6

General education humanities course

3

Elective or ROTC

3

 

32

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Accounting 2001; and 2021 or 2101

6

Agricultural Economics 3003, 3203,3213, 3413, 3503 or3603, or 4503

15

Finance 3200 or 3201

3

Management 3200

3

Marketing 3401

3

College of Agriculture elective

3

General education arts course

3

 

36

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Agricultural Economics 4273, 4403, 4413, 4433, 4603

15

General education humanities course

3

General education social sciences course

3

Area of concentration courses/approved AGEC electives

6

Area of concentration courses/electives

6

 

33

Areas of Concentration

> Agribusiness Finance

Required Courses (12 hrs.)—AGEC 3303 and 4443; and six hours to be selected from one of the following areas: (1) Real Estate—FIN 3351, 3352, 3353, 3355 or (2) Investment—FIN 3440, 3632, 3636, 3715, 3717, 3826.

> Agribusiness Management

Required Courses (12 hrs.)—six hours to be selected from a list of AGEC courses and six hours to be selected from a list of INED and MGT courses; both lists are available in the Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness.

> International Marketing

Required Courses (12 hrs.)—AGEC 3603 and MKT 4443; and six hours to be selected from a list of courses in AGEC, MGT, or foreign languages available in the Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRONOMY
HEAD- Martin, Professor
OFFICE- 104 Sturgis Hall
TELEPHONE- 225/388-2110
FAX- 225/388-1403

PROFESSORS EMERITI- Caffey, Dunigan, Tipton
PROFESSORS- Board, Breitenbeck, Harrison, Harville, Hudnall, Kang, Martin, Ricaud, Selim
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS- Bell, Kennedy, Kovar, Myers, Oard, Venuto, Walthall
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR- Gaston
INSTRUCTORS- Cross, Lindsey
ADJUNCT FACULTY- Delaune, Lindau, Patrick
CURRICULUM COORDINATOR- Breitenbeck, Professor

OFFICE- 314 Sturgis Hall
TELEPHONE- 225/388-2110

CURRICULA:

Plant & Soil Systems (Agronomic Crops Area; Soil Science Area)
Environmental Management Systems

PLANT AND SOIL SYSTEMS

Consolidation of curricula in agronomy and horticulture resulted in the curriculum in plant and soil systems. All students in this curriculum take core courses which provide a basic knowledge required for specialization in one of five areas: agronomic crops; horticultural science; ornamental, olericulture, and pomology; soil science; and turfgrass management. Each area is further individualized by the addition of approved and free electives. Students interested in pursuing a minor in agronomy or horticulture may take suggested courses for the minor as part of approved and free electives. (See the section on College of Agriculture minors for details.)

The Department of Agronomy offers areas of concentration in agronomic crops and soil science, preparing students for professional careers in government, industry, or graduate study in areas related to crops, soils, and/or water.

In addition to the curriculum outlined for a plant and soil systems major, students selecting the agronomic crops area of concentration take courses in agronomy, biological sciences, economics, entomology, experimental statistics, genetics, geology, physics, and plant health, as well as several hours of approved electives.

In the soil science concentration students also take courses in agronomy, biological sciences, genetics, chemistry, geology, and physics, as well as 14 hours of approved electives.

Students can take advantage of the opportunity to work with one of the agronomy faculty in his/her research area. This may be in the form of a special problems course or a student-worker job.

CURRICULUM IN PLANT AND SOIL SYSTEMS

TOTAL SEM. HRS.- 132

* The number of credit hours in each group in the sophomore, junior, and senior years depends on the area of concentration. The total for each year must equal that specified in the curriculum

** For Agronomy department areas of concentration.

*** For Horticulture department areas of concentration

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 1201, 1208

4

Biological Sciences 1402

4

Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212

8

English 1000/1001, 1002

6

Mathematics 1020/1021 and 1022

6

General education arts course

3

General education social sciences course

3

 

34

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Agronomy 2051

4

Chemistry 2060 or 2261

3

Agricultural Economics 2003 or Economics 2030

3

Speech Communication 2060

3

General education humanities course

6

Area of concentration courses*

12-13

Approved electives*

3-2

 

34

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences/Plant Health 3060

4

English 2002 or 3002

3

Agronomy 3010 or 3090** or Horticulture 3000 or 3010***

3

Area of concentration courses*

12

Approved electives*

9

Electives or ROTC

3

 

34

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Agronomy 4052

4

Plant Health 4000

3

Area of concentration courses*

6-8

Approved electives*

14-12

Electives or ROTC

3

 

30

 

Areas of Concentration

> Agronomic Crops (30-31.)

Agronomy 1001; Agronomy 3000; Agronomy 3011, 3012, 3013 (select 2); Agronomy 4080; Biological Sciences 1011 or 2051 or 2083 or 4087; Biological Sciences 2153; Entomology 2050; Experimental Statistics 2201 or 4001; Plant Health 4070.

** A list of approved electives available in the Department of Agronomy.

> Soil Science (31-32 hrs.)

Agronomy 4055, 4056, 4058; Biological Sciences 1011 or 2051; Chemistry 2001, 2002; Experimental Statistics 2201 or 4001; Geology 1001, 1601; Physics 2001, 2108.

** A list of approved electives is available from the Department of Agronomy.

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
CURRICULUM COORDINATOR- Breitenbeck, Professor
OFFICE- 311 Sturgis Hall
TELEPHONE- 225/388-1347

The curriculum in environmental management systems is designed for students interested in manipulating the environment for more efficient management of land and soils, water, and air quality.

As earth's population increases, demand will escalate for clean food and water and proper land use. These activities, in combination with heightened energy requirements, will increase stress on our natural resources. Concurrently, increased public awareness of environmental pollution will spur the development of safe and effective waste management and pollution control. Students who complete this curriculum will be prepared to meet these challenges. Through proper selection of the approved electives, students can specialize in one of three areas of environmental management systems—land and soils, water, or air.

Students have the opportunity to study the effects of human activity on earth's ecosystems. A key component of this curriculum is the environmental impact on animal and plant life of toxic residues, surface and ground water contamination, and pollutants. Technology and policy designed to regulate and manage environmental problems are also studied.

CURRICULUM IN ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

TOTAL SEM. HRS.- 130

Approved Electives- A list of approved electives is available from the Department of Agronomy. Students may select no more than six hrs. of approved electives below the 3000 level.

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 1201, 1208 and 1402 or 1502,1509

8

Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212

8

English 1000/1001, 1002

6

Environmental Management Systems 1011

3

Mathematics 1020/1021, 1022

6

General education arts course

3

 

34

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Agronomy 2051

4

Agricultural Economics 2003 or Economics 2030

3

Chemistry 2060 or 2261*

3

Experimental Statistics 2000 or ISDS 1100 or CSC 1250

3

Mathematics 1431 or 1550

3-5

Physics 2001

3

Political Science 2051 or Sociology 2001

3

Speech Communication 2060

3

Area of concentration courses

6

Electives or ROTC

2-0

 

33

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

English 3002 or 3101

3

Environmental Management Systems 3040, 3050

7

Management 3200

3

General education humanities courses

6

Area of concentration courses

14

 

33

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Environmental Studies 4477 or Environmental Management Systems 4030

3

Experimental Statistics 2201 or Sociology 2201

4

Marketing 3401 or Mass Communications 3000 or Agricultural Economics 3213

3

Area of concentration courses

10

Electives or ROTC

10

 

30

 

Areas of Concentration

> Environmental Science

Required Courses (30 hrs.)—CHEM 2001, 2002, 2262; BIOL 2051; AGRO 4055; select one: OCS 4040 or 4165; select one AGRO 4056, BIOL 3115 or 4110 or 4090; and nine (9) hrs. of approved electives from a list at the department or college.

> Policy Analysis

Required Courses (30 hrs.)—ACCT 3233 and 4236; AGRO 4078; ENVS 4101; select one: FIN 3201 or AGEC 3803; select one: ECON 4320 or AGEC 3503; select one: ENVS 4149 or OCS 4465; and ten (10) hrs. of approved electives from a list at the department or college.

> Research Conservation

Required Courses (30 hrs.)—AGEC 3503; AGRO 3040, 4052, and 4078; GEOG 4045 or 4047; ENVS 4101; and select one: OCS 4560 or 4465 or 4166; and ten (10) hrs. of approved electives from a list at the department or college.

DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL SCIENCE
HEAD- Humes, Professor
OFFICE- 105 Francioni Hall
TELEPHONE- 225/388-3241
FAX- 225/388-3279
E-MAIL- phumes@agctr.lsu.edu 

BOYD PROFESSOR- Godke
PROFESSORS- Bidner, Fernandez, Franke, Godke, Humes, McMillin, Southern, Thompson, White
INSTRUCTOR- Denniston
ADJUNCT FACULTY- Chapman, Del Vecchio, Depew, Dresser, Dumas, Leibo, Miller, Page, Pope, Sanson

CURRICULUM:

Animal, Dairy, and Poultry Sciences (Animal Science Area, Science and Technology Area, "Three-Plus-One Program")

The Department of Animal Science offers programs in animal science (animal, dairy, and poultry sciences curriculum). Animal science involves all aspects of animal production including genetics, nutrition, physiology, animal evaluation, animal health, livestock marketing and farm management. Meat science includes meat processing, quality control, packaging, marketing, and distribution of meat products to the consumer.

ANIMAL, DAIRY, AND POULTRY SCIENCES

The curriculum in animal, dairy, and poultry sciences consolidates the programs in the Departments of Animal Science, Dairy Science, and Poultry Science. Students take basic courses during the first two years and follow a selected area of concentration during the junior and senior years. Within each area of concentration, students select approved and free electives. Students interested in choosing an approved minor can take the suggested courses for the minor as part of approved and free electives. See the listing of College of Agriculture minors for details.

Prior to entering the program, students are encouraged to consult a counselor for guidance in scheduling courses. Those students interested in entering the School of Veterinary Medicine must take BIOL 1201 and 1208, 1502 and 1509, 2051, 2083; CHEM 2261, 2262, 2364 or CHEM 2060, MATH 1020/1021 and 1022; PHYS 2001 and 2002; and SPCM 2010 or 2060 to meet admission requirements.

Graduates of the animal, dairy, and poultry sciences curriculum find career opportunities in a variety of production enterprises and animal-related agribusinesses, such as commercial livestock, dairy, and poultry enterprises; feed, pharmaceutical, and supply companies; commodity processing and food product industries; and various state and federal agencies including the cooperative extension service. Students selecting the science-directed electives are prepared to enter graduate school.

CURRICULUM IN ANIMAL, DAIRY, AND POULTRY SCIENCES

TOTAL SEM. HRS.- 134

*The number of credit hours in each group in the junior and senior years depends on the area of concentration. The total for each year must equal that specified in the curriculum.

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Animal Science 1011, or Dairy Science 1048, or Poultry Science 1049

3

Biological Sciences 1001, 1002, 1005, or Biological Sciences 1201, 1208,1502, 1509

8

Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212

8

English 1000/1001, 1002

6

Mathematics 1020/1021; 1022 or 1431

6

General education arts course

3

 

34

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Agriculture 2072 or Biological Sciences 2153

3-4

Biological Sciences 2051

4

Chemistry 2060 or 2261

3

Economics 2030

3

Experimental Statistics 2201

4

Speech Communication 2060

3

General education humanities courses

6

General education social sciences course

3

Area of concentration courses

3

 

32-33

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Area of concentration courses*

10-18

Approved electives*

6-15

Electives or ROTC*

3-18

 

34

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Area of concentration courses*

5-17

Approved electives*

6-15

Electives or ROTC*

5-16

 

33-34

Areas of Concentration

> Animal Science

Required Courses (34 hrs.)—ANSC 2133, 3033, 3053, 4009, 4092, EXST 2000, VETS 2000. Select ANSC 4018, 4045, and DARY 3010 and any two from ANSC 4001, 4081, 4084, 4086, 4088; or select ANSC 4094, FDSC 4000, 4040, 4162, and either FDSC 4005 or 4050.

Approved Electives (20 hrs.)—Select any 2000-level or higher courses from an approved list available from the Department of Animal Science.

> Science and Technology

Required courses (32 hrs.)—Select at least 16 hrs. from courses in ANSC, DARY, or PLSC, and remaining hours from BIOL 3000-4999, CHEM 2000-4999, PHYS 2000-4999, or NS 4000-4999.

Approved Electives (21 hrs.)—Select 21 hrs. from the approved electives list available from the Departments of Animal, Dairy, or Poultry Science.

> Three-Plus-One

Required Courses (38 hrs.)—completion of first year of LSU School of Veterinary Medicine curriculum with a gpa of at least 2.00.

Approved Electives (21 hrs.)—Select from the list of approved electives available in the Departments of Animal, Dairy, or Poultry Science.

Students entering the School of Veterinary Medicine after completion of the first three years of the animal, dairy, and poultry sciences curriculum (102 hours) may receive the B.S. degree following successful completion of the first year of the professional curriculum in veterinary medicine. (See the School of Veterinary Medicine Bulletin for details of the first year of the professional curriculum.)

Students pursuing this program will be required to establish residence in the College of Agriculture for 30 semester hours prior to entering the School of Veterinary Medicine. They also must make application for the degree through the dean's office in the College of Agriculture no later than 15 days after classes begin in the semester in which the degree is to be awarded.

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
HEAD- Verma, H. Rouse Caffey Endowed Professor
OFFICE- 149 E. B. Doran Building
TELEPHONE- 225/388-3153
FAX- 225/388-3492

H. ROUSE CAFFEY ENDOWED PROFESSOR- Verma
PROFESSORS EMERITI- Braud, Cockran, Lawson, Mayeux, Sistler
PROFESSORS- Bengtson, Brown, Stipe, Velupillai, Verma, Wright
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS- Edling, Mailander
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS- Drapcho, Lima, Walker
ADJUNCT FACULTY- Forbes, Fouss, Kornecki, Parish, Robbins

CURRICULUM:

Biological Engineering 
(See the "College of Engineering" section of this catalog.)

DEPARTMENT OF DAIRY SCIENCE
HEAD- Jenny, Professor
OFFICE- 111 Dairy Science Building
TELEPHONE- 225/388-4411
FAX- 225/388-4008

PROFESSORS EMERITI- Frye, Gholson, Roussel, Rusoff
PROFESSORS- Adkinson, Baham, Chandler, Gough, Jenny
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS- Achacoso, McGregor
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR- Williams
INSTRUCTORS- Baron, Boeneke
ADJUNCT FACULTY- Bordson, Degelos, Ingawa, Nickerson, Snider

CURRICULUM:

Animal, Dairy, and Poultry Sciences (Dairy Production Area, Dairy Foods Technology Area, Science and Technology Area, "Three-Plus-One Program")

The Department of Dairy Science, in cooperation with two other departments, offers the curriculum in animal, dairy, and poultry sciences. A concentration in dairy production involves all aspects of milk production including dairy cattle nutrition, genetics, reproductive physiology, herd health, and farm management. The concentration in dairy foods technology involves all aspects of dairy product manufacturing, quality assurance, packaging, marketing, and distribution of the final product to the consumer.

Some students participate in research activities with various faculty members while others participate in the operation of the dairy farm and dairy plant. These activities offer students an opportunity to gain valuable experience to supplement classroom studies.

ANIMAL, DAIRY, AND POULTRY SCIENCES

The curriculum in animal, dairy, and poultry sciences consolidates the curricula for the Departments of Animal Science, Dairy Science, and Poultry Science. Students take basic courses during the first two years and follow a selected area of concentration during the junior and senior years. Within each area of concentration, students select approved and free electives. Students interested in choosing an approved minor can take the suggested courses for the minor as part of approved and free electives. See the listing of College of Agriculture minors for details.

Prior to entering the program, students are encouraged to consult a counselor for guidance in scheduling courses. Those students interested in entering the School of Veterinary Medicine must take BIOL 1201 and 1208, 1502 and 1509, 2051, 2083; CHEM 2261, 2262, 2364 or CHEM 2060; MATH 1020/1021 and 1022; PHYS 2001 and 2002; and SPCM 2010 or 2060 to meet admission requirements.

Graduates of the animal, dairy, and poultry sciences curriculum find career opportunities in a variety of production and animal-related agribusinesses, such as commercial livestock, dairy, and poultry enterprises; feed, pharmaceutical, and supply companies; commodity processing and food product industries; and various state and federal agencies including the cooperative extension service. Students selecting the science-directed electives are prepared to enter graduate school.

CURRICULUM IN ANIMAL, DAIRY, AND POULTRY SCIENCES

TOTAL SEM. HRS. - 134

*The number of credit hours in each group in the junior and senior years depends on the area of concentration. The total for each year must equal that specified in the curriculum.

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Animal Science 1011, or Dairy Science 1048, or Poultry Science 1049

3

Biological Sciences 1001, 1002, 1005,or Biological Sciences 1201, 1208,1502, 1509

8

Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212

8

English 1000/1001, 1002

6

Mathematics 1020/1021; 1022 or 1431

6

General education arts course

3

 

34

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Dairy Science 2072 or Biological Sciences 2153

3-4

Biological Sciences 2051

4

Chemistry 2060 or 2261

3

Economics 2030

3

Experimental Statistics 2201

4

Speech Communication 2060

3

General education humanities courses

6

General education social sciences course

3

Area of concentration courses

3

 

32-33

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Area of concentration courses*

10-18

Approved electives*

6-15

Electives or ROTC*

3-18

 

34

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Area of concentration courses*

5-17

Approved electives*

6-15

Electives or ROTC*

5-16

 

33-34

 

Areas of Concentration

> Dairy Production

Required Courses (21 hrs.)—DARY 2075, 2085, 3010, 4043, 4045, 4051, 4054, 4118.

Approved Electives (22 hrs.)—Select 22 hrs. from the approved electives list available from the Department of Dairy Science.

> Dairy Foods Technology

Required Courses (22 hrs.)—DARY 2075, 2085, 2093, 4020, 4040, 4051, 4081; AGEC 4213.

Approved Electives (21 hrs.)—Select 21 hrs. from the approved electives list available from the Department of Dairy Science.

> Science and Technology

Required courses (32 hrs.)—Select at least 16 hrs. from courses in ANSC, DARY, or PLSC, and remaining hours from BIOL 3000-4999, CHEM 2000-4999, PHYS 2000-4999, or NS 4000-4999.

Approved Electives (21 hrs.)—Select 21 hrs. from the approved electives list available from the Departments of Animal, Dairy, or Poultry Science.

> Three-Plus-One

Required Courses (38 hrs.)—completion of first year of LSU School of Veterinary Medicine curriculum with a gpa of at least 2.00.

Approved Electives (21 hrs.)—Select from the list of approved electives available in the Departments of Animal, Dairy, or Poultry Science.

Students entering the School of Veterinary Medicine after completion of the first three years of the animal, dairy, and poultry sciences curriculum (102 hours) may receive the B.S. degree following successful completion of the first year of the professional curriculum in veterinary medicine. (See the School of Veterinary Medicine Bulletin for details of the first year of the professional curriculum.)

Students pursuing this program will be required to establish residence in the College of Agriculture for 30 semester hours prior to entering the School of Veterinary Medicine. They also must make application for the degree through the dean's office in the College of Agriculture no later than 15 days after classes begin in the semester in which the degree is to be awarded.

DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY
HEAD- Guillot, Professor
OFFICE- 402 Life Sciences Building
TELEPHONE- 225/388-1634
FAX- 225/388-1643

PROFESSORS- Boethel, Foil, Fuxa, Goyer, Guillot, Hammond, Johnson, Meek, Prowell, Reagan, Riley, Story
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS- Henderson, Leonard, Ottea
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS- Carlton, Hooper-Bui, Stout
ADJUNCT FACULTY- Danka, Harbo, Rinderer

CURRICULUM:

The Department of Entomology offers instruction at the undergraduate and graduate levels. An undergraduate minor in entomology is available (see section on minor fields in this chapter). See the Graduate Bulletin for a description of the M.S. and Ph.D. programs in entomology.

DEPARTMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL STATISTICS
HEAD- Moser, Professor
OFFICE- 161 Agricultural Administration Building
TELEPHONE- 225/388-8303
FAX- 225/388-8344

PROFESSORS- Blouin, Escobar, Geaghan, Koonce, LaMotte, Marx, Moser
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR- Monlezun
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR- Downer
INSTRUCTORS- Church, Coxe, Swoope
ADJUNCT FACULTY- Georgiev, Icaza, Meeker

CURRICULUM:

No undergraduate program is available. See the Graduate Bulletin for a description of the graduate program.

The Department of Experimental Statistics provides instruction at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The Master of Applied Statistics, offered by this department, is designed to acquaint graduate students with the techniques of statistical methods and their application to various fields of specialization. For additional information concerning this program, consult the Graduate Bulletin.

DEPARTMENT OF FOOD SCIENCE
HEAD- Park, Professor
OFFICE- 111 Food Science Building
TELEPHONE- 225/388-5206
FAX- 225/388-5300

PROFESSORS EMERITI- Grodner, Liuzzo, Meyers, Mullins
PROFESSORS- Cross, Day, Godber, Hegsted, Moody, Park, Rao
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS- Cross, Lutz
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS- King, Losso, Lyon, Prinyawiwatkul
ADJUNCT FACULTY- Andrews, Champagne, Cotty, Diack, Farr, Hamada, Hwang, Kampen, Kilgen, Kim, Lima, Marshall, McGregor, McMillin, Patrick, Portier, Thune, Tulley, Walker, Wan, Wilson, York
CURRICULUM COORDINATOR - Godber, Professor

OFFICE- 111 Food Science Building
TELEPHONE- 225/388-5192

CURRICULUM:

Nutrition, Food, and Culinary Sciences

NUTRITION, FOOD, AND CULINARY SCIENCES

The nutrition, food, and culinary sciences curriculum combines food and nutrition components in the Department of Food Science and the School of Human Ecology into a single, versatile program within the College of Agriculture. Through a common core of courses, students are provided a basic foundation for the study of post-production food products. By selecting various areas of concentration, students choose a program of study suited to their specific needs and interests—culinary science, nutrition/premedical or food science and technology. Electives allow even greater individualization of the curriculum, which also provides excellent preparation for students entering graduate or professional study in food-related disciplines.

The objective of the culinary science area is to prepare students for employment in the food industry with a basic science foundation and specialized training in food systems management. Science-based understanding of food quality is established, coupled with a minor in business administration giving students broad employment opportunities throughout the vast food industry. Students are prepared for management-level positions in food service, hotel and restaurant, and food product development companies.

The nutrition/premedical area provides an academic foundation for entry into medical school or for graduate study and research in human nutrition and/or food. Employment opportunities are available in research, education, journalism, and medicine within private industry, academia, public health service, and state, national, and international agencies.

The food science and technology area is designed for students interested in the basic aspects of food science and technology. Course work emphasizes the impact of basic science on food technology and food processing. Students are prepared for graduate study or for employment in technical positions within the food industry, including quality assurance, product development, and technical services.

CURRICULUM IN NUTRITION, FOOD, AND CULINARY SCIENCES

TOTAL SEM. HRS. - 128

For culinary science area (1)
For nutrition area (2)
For food science area (3)

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 1201, 1208, 1502, and 1509

8

Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212

8

English 1000/1001, 1002

6

Mathematics 1020/1021 and 10221or 1022 and 15502 or 1022 and 14413

6-8

General education arts course

3

Electives or ROTC

4-2

 

35

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 2051

4

Chemistry 20601 or 2261 and 22622,3

3-6

Economics 20301,3 or general education social sciences course

3

Human Ecology 2010

3

Human Ecology 20181,2 or Experimental Statistics 20003

2-3

Area or minor requirements

13-3

Electives or ROTC

3-9

 

31

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 2083 or 40872,3

3-4

Experimental Statistics 2201

4

Food Science 30151 or 4060

3-4

Food Science 4162

4

Area or minor requirements

6-13

Electives or ROTC

9-0

 

29

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Human Ecology 4010

3

Food Science 4076

3

General education humanities courses

9

General education social sciences course

3

Area or minor requirements

9-14

Electives or ROTC

6-1

 

33

 

Areas of Concentration

> Culinary Science

Required Courses (21 hrs.)—FDSC 4040, 4070, 4075; HUEC 2014, 3019, 3021, 4023.

Minor in Business Administration (18 hrs.)—ACCT 2000 or 2001, 2101; ECON 2035; FIN 3715; MGT 3200, MKT 3401.

> Food Science and Technology

Required Courses (22-23 hrs.)—FDSC 4005, 4040, 4050, 4070, 4075; PHYS 2001; Select one food processing course from ANSC 3053, DARY 4020, HORT 4051, PLSC 4032.

> Nutrition/Premedical

Required Courses (36 hrs.)—CHEM 2001, 2002, 2364; HUEC 1000, 2012, 3012, 3016, 4011, 4013, 4014, 4017; PHYS 2001, 2002, 2108, 2109.

DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE
HEAD - Hegwood, Professor
OFFICE - 137 J. C. Miller Hall
TELEPHONE - 225/388-2158
FAX - 225/388-1068

PROFESSORS EMERITI - O'Rourke, Standifer, Young
PROFESSORS - Hegwood, Johnson, Picha, Wilson
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS - LaBonte, McCrimmon, Motsenbocker
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS - Bush, Kuehny
INSTRUCTORS - Mirabello, Reynolds
CURRICULUM COORDINATOR - LaBonte, Associate Professor

OFFICE - 131 J. C. Miller Hall
TELEPHONE - 225/388-1024

CURRICULUM:

Plant & Soil Systems (Horticultural Science Area; Ornamental, Olericulture, and Pomology Area; Turfgrass Management Area)

PLANT AND SOIL SYSTEMS

Consolidation of curricula in agronomy and horticulture resulted in the curriculum in plant and soil systems. All students in this curriculum take core courses which provide a basic knowledge required for specialization in one of five areas: agronomic crops; horticultural science; ornamental, olericulture, and pomology; soil science; and turfgrass management. Each area is further individualized by the addition of approved and free electives.

Students interested in pursuing a minor in agronomy or horticulture may take suggested courses for the minor as part of the approved and free electives. (See the section on College of Agriculture minors for details.)

The three areas of concentration (horticultural science; ornamental, olericulture, and pomology; and turfgrass management) are designed to prepare students for various career opportunities using a cross-disciplinary studies approach. Prior to entering the program, students are encouraged to consult the curriculum coordinator for guidance in selecting courses.

Students selecting the ornamental, olericulture, and pomology area of concentration will be prepared for careers in floriculture, nursery crop production, landscape horticulture, and the production and processing of fruits and vegetables. Floriculture is the cultivation and management of cut flowers and flowering and foliage plants. Careers in floriculture include floral design and marketing, interior landscaping, and the production of cut flowers and potted plants for distribution to florists, garden centers, landscape maintenance firms, arboreta, botanical gardens, and tissue culture propagation laboratories. Landscape horticulture involves the design and construction of landscape sites, as well as planting and maintenance of woody and herbaceous plants, turfgrass, ornamental bulbs, and related crops. Career opportunities in olericulture and pomology include jobs as field representatives and farm consultants, food processors, agricultural chemical suppliers, and produce brokers.

Students electing the horticultural science area of concentration are prepared to pursue graduate studies in horticulture and related sciences. Horticultural scientists conduct research in areas such as crop culture and management; molecular biology; plant breeding and genetics; plant growth and development; plant metabolism and nutrition; propagation; post harvest and stress physiology; and tissue culture. Horticulturists teach at every level, including high schools, community colleges, and universities. Public service in horticultural extension includes advising home gardeners, professional horticulturists, and horticultural crop producers.

Students selecting the turfgrass management area pursue careers as landscape designers and managers; sports field managers; golf course superintendents; or professionals employed by the urban agricultural products industry. In addition to the basic core courses in the curriculum, students study turf and ornamental management, pest identification and control, pesticide application techniques, landscape design, and small engine maintenance. Twelve hours of business electives provide additional experience in financial and personnel management.

CURRICULUM IN PLANT AND SOIL SYSTEMS

TOTAL SEM. HRS. - 132

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 1201, 1208, 1402

8

Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212

8

English 1000/1001, 1002

6

Mathematics 1020/1021 and 1022

6

General education arts course

3

General education social sciences course

3

 

34

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Agronomy 2051

4

Chemistry 2060 or 2261

3

Agricultural Economics 2003 or Economics 2030

3

Speech Communication 2060

3

General education humanities course

6

Area of concentration courses*

12-13

Approved electives*

3-2

 

34

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences/Plant Health 3060

4

English 2002 or 3002

3

Agronomy 3010 or 3090** or Horticulture 3000 or 3010***

3

Area of concentration courses*

12

Approved electives*

9

Electives or ROTC

3

 

34

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Agronomy 4052

4

Plant Health 4000

3

Area of concentration courses*

6-8

Approved electives*

14-12

Electives or ROTC

3

 

30

 

Areas of Concentration

> Horticultural Science (33 hrs.)

Dairy Science 2072; Biological Sciences 2083; Entomology 2001; Experimental Statistics 2201 or 4001; Horticulture 2050, 2061, 2076, 3012, 4096; Horticulture 4012.

** A list of approved electives is available in the Department of Horticulture.

> Ornamental, Olericulture, and Pomology (32 hrs.)

Entomology 2001; Horticulture 2050, 2061, 2076, 3012, 3015, 4071, 4086; Landscape Architecture 2121; Plant Health 4070.

> Turfgrass Management (33 hrs.)

Entomology 2001, 4012; Horticulture 2050, 2061, 3012, 3015, 4086, 4090; Landscape Architecture 2121; Plant Health 4070.

(A list of approved electives is available from the department.)

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT PATHOLOGY AND CROP PHYSIOLOGY
HEAD - Snow, Professor
OFFICE - 302 Life Sciences Building
TELEPHONE - 225/388-1464
FAX - 225/388-1415

PROFESSORS - Berggren, Clark, Cohn, Griffin, Holcomb, Hoy, Jones, McGawley, Murai, Rush, Schneider, Snow, Valverde
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR - Damann
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS - Evans, Webster
ADJUNCT FACULTY - Black, Bond, Croughan, Dyer, Groth, Linscombe

CURRICULUM:

No undergraduate program is available. See the Graduate Bulletin for a description of the graduate program.

DEPARTMENT OF POULTRY SCIENCE
ACTING HEAD - Hebert, Professor
OFFICE - 102 Poultry Science Building
TELEPHONE - 225/388-4481
FAX - 225/388-1259

PROFESSORS - Hebert, Satterlee
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS - Farr, Ingram
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR - Cadd
ADJUNCT FACULTY - Cox

CURRICULUM:

Animal, Dairy, and Poultry Sciences (Poultry Science Area, Science and Technology Area, "Three-Plus-One Program")

The Department of Poultry Science offers programs in poultry science which provide individuals with a broad educational background tailored to meet their needs and aptitudes. Such preparation provides graduates with employment opportunities in all phases of poultry production, processing, distribution, marketing, research, and teaching. Preparatory curricula also are provided for subsequent training at the graduate level or in veterinary medicine.

Qualified undergraduate students have the opportunity to participate in the Summer Internship Program with well paid stipends. This program integrates academic experience on campus with work experience off campus, providing a total educational experience that prepares the student for responsible participation in industry following graduation.

ANIMAL, DAIRY, AND POULTRY SCIENCES

The curriculum in animal, dairy, and poultry sciences consolidates the curricula for the Departments of Animal Science, Dairy Science, and Poultry Science. Students take basic courses during the first two years and follow a selected area of concentration during the junior and senior years. Within each area of concentration, students select approved and free electives. Students interested in choosing an approved minor can take the suggested courses for the minor as part of the approved and free electives. See the listing of College of Agriculture minors for details.

Prior to entering the program, students are encouraged to consult a counselor for guidance in scheduling courses. Those students interested in entering the School of Veterinary Medicine must take BIOL 1201 and 1208, 1502 and 1509, 2051; CHEM 2261, 2262, 2364 or CHEM 2060, BIOL 2083; MATH 1020/1021 and 1022; PHYS 2001 and 2002; SPCM 2010 or 2060 to meet admission requirements.

Graduates of the Animal, Dairy, and Poultry Sciences curriculum find career opportunities in a variety of production enterprises and animal-related agribusinesses, such as commercial livestock, dairy, and poultry enterprises; feed, pharmaceutical, and supply companies; commodity processing and food product industries; and various state and federal agencies including the cooperative extension service. Students selecting the science-directed electives are prepared to enter graduate school.

CURRICULUM IN ANIMAL, DAIRY, AND POULTRY SCIENCES

TOTAL SEM. HRS. - 134

*The number of credit hours in each group in the junior and senior years depends on the area of concentration. The total for each year must equal that specified in the curriculum.

 

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Animal Science 1011, or Dairy Science 1048, or Poultry Science 1049

3

Biological Sciences 1001, 1002, 1005, 1201, 1208, 1502, 1509

8

Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212

8

English 1000/1001, 1002

6

Mathematics 1020/1021; 1022 or 1431

6

General education arts course

3

 

34

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Agriculture 2072 or Biological Sciences 2153

3-4

Biological Sciences 2051

4

Chemistry 2060 or 2261

3

Economics 2030

3

Experimental Statistics 2201

4

Speech Communication 2060

3

General education humanities courses

6

General education social sciences course

3

Area of concentration courses

3

 

32-33

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Area of concentration courses*

10-18

Approved electives*

6-15

Electives or ROTC*

3-18

 

34

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Area of concentration courses*

5-17

Approved electives*

6-15

Electives or ROTC*

5-16

 

33-34

Areas of Concentration

> Poultry Science

Required Courses (16 hrs.)—PLSC 2040, 4032, 4052; VETS 4004 or DARY 4020; PLSC 4031 or FDSC 4005; PLSC 4051 or PLSC 4040.

Approved Electives (21 hrs.)—Select 21 hrs. from the approved electives list available from the Department of Poultry Science.

> Science and Technology

Required courses (32 hrs.)—Select at least 16 hrs. from courses in ANSC, DARY, or PLSC, and remaining hours from BIOL 3000-4999, CHEM 2000-4999, PHYS 2000-4999, or NS 4000-4999.

Approved Electives (21 hrs.)—Select 21 hrs. from the approved electives list available from the Departments of Animal, Dairy, or Poultry Science.

> Three-Plus-One

Required Courses (38 hrs.)—completion of first year of LSU School of Veterinary Medicine curriculum with a gpa of at least 2.00.

Approved Electives (21 hrs.)—Select from the list of approved electives available in the Departments of Animal, Dairy, or Poultry Science.

Students entering the School of Veterinary Medicine after completion of the first three years of the animal, dairy, and poultry sciences curriculum (102 hours) may receive the B.S. degree following successful completion of the first year of the professional curriculum in veterinary medicine. (See the School of Veterinary Medicine Bulletin for details of the first year of the professional curriculum.)

Students pursuing this program will be required to establish residence in the College of Agriculture for 30 semester hours prior to entering the School of Veterinary Medicine. They also must make application for the degree through the dean's office in the College of Agriculture no later than 15 days after classes begin in the semester in which the degree is to be awarded.

PREVETERINARY MEDICINE
CURRICULUM COORDINATOR - French, Professor
OFFICE - 136 Dalrymple Building
TELEPHONE - 225/388-5440

Students seeking a career in veterinary medicine must be prepared to complete a minimum of six years of college education, including two or more years in the preveterinary curriculum. Preprofessional requirements may be completed at LSU or at any accredited college or university offering courses of the content and quality prescribed in this catalog. Students desiring to enter the preveterinary medicine curriculum should contact the dean of the College of Agriculture prior to initial registration to ensure proper enrollment in required courses.

Some students find it advantageous to start their preprofessional training the summer after high school graduation. Currently, all colleges of veterinary medicine in the U.S. have more qualified applicants than can be admitted. Because it will not be possible to admit all eligible applicants, students who have completed 75 hours of course work and who are not admitted to the professional program will be required to select a degree-granting curriculum and work toward a bachelor's degree. Selection of a curriculum in no way restricts further application to the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine.

The School of Veterinary Medicine's Faculty Committee on Admissions requires a formal application with supporting credentials from each candidate. The deadline for submission of the application and related materials is in October of the year prior to which admission is desired. October 1 is the deadline for all students. Admission to the professional program of the school will be granted only for the fall semester and only on a full-time basis. Class size will be limited.

Scholastic achievement will be measured by performance in the required preprofessional courses. Students must have a grade-point average of at least 2.50 ("A" =  4) in required courses for consideration for admission. A grade of less than "C" in a required course is unacceptable. All preprofessional requirements for the LSU program in veterinary medicine must be completed by the end of the spring semester of the calendar year for which application is made. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Medical College Aptitude Test (MCAT) scores must be submitted no later than December 15th preceding the year in which admission is sought. Applicants who do not submit standardized test scores by this date will not be considered for acceptance. Final selection of applicants for admission to the professional curriculum in veterinary medicine will be made by the School of Veterinary Medicine's Faculty Committee on Admissions.

The two-year preveterinary curriculum for the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine is listed below. Requests for additional information concerning the preveterinary program should be addressed to: Dean, College of Agriculture, or Dean, School of Veterinary Medicine. Admission to the preveterinary curriculum does not carry assurance that the student will be admitted to the professional curriculum. See also the "School of Veterinary Medicine" section of this catalog.

Three-Plus-One Program

Students entering the School of Veterinary Medicine following completion of the first three years of the animal, dairy, and poultry sciences curriculum (102 hours) may receive the B.S. degree following successful completion of the first year of the professional curriculum in veterinary medicine. (See the School of Veterinary Medicine Bulletin.)

Students pursuing this program will be required to establish residence in the College of Agriculture for 30 semester hours prior to entering the School of Veterinary Medicine. They must also make application for the degree through the office of the dean, College of Agriculture, no later than 15 days after classes begin in the semester in which the degree is to be awarded.

CURRICULUM IN PREVETERINARY MEDICINE

FRESHMAN YEAR (1ST SEM.)

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 1201, 1208

4

Chemistry 1201

3

English 1000/1001

3

Mathematics 1020/1021

3

Elective

3

 

16

 

FRESHMAN YEAR (2ND SEM.)

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 1502, 1509

4

Chemistry 1202, 1212

5

English 1002

3

Mathematics 1022

3

Elective

3

 

18

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR (1ST SEM.)

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 2083

3

Chemistry 2060

3

Physics 2001

3

Speech Communication 2010 or 2060

3

Electives

3

 

15

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR (2ND SEM.)

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 2051

4

Physics 2002

3

Electives

10

 

17

 

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY, WILDLIFE, AND FISHERIES
DIRECTOR - Blackmon, Professor
OFFICE - 227 Forestry-Wildlife-Fisheries Building
TELEPHONE - 225/388-4131
FAX - 225/388-4227

PROFESSORS EMERITI - Avault, Burns, Carter, Culley, Fogg, Hansbrough, Linnartz, Noble
PROFESSORS - Carpenter, Chambers, Chang, Choong, Clason, Johnson, Kelso, Reigh, Romaire, Shilling, Smith, Tiersch, Wright
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS - Cao, de Hoop, Dean, Hamilton, Lockhart, Rohwer, Rutherford, Stine, Vlosky
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS - Guddanti, Liu, Shupe, Weirich, Wu
ADJUNCT FACULTY - Afton, Bryan, Goyer, Hohman, Jones, Lorio, Lutz, Niami, Pace, Supan

CURRICULA:

Forestry (Forest Management)
Wildlife and Fisheries

The School of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries offers undergraduate and graduate education to students who wish to study these disciplines. Two undergraduate curricula are available which provide students with professional education in forestry or in wildlife and fisheries. All students in the forestry curriculum take the core of courses listed below and must choose one of two areas of concentration: forest management or ecosystem management. The curriculum is designed to educate students in fundamental sciences and in the theory and practice of renewable natural resources management and to prepare students for graduate study in more specialized areas of forestry. Accordingly, the forestry curriculum has the flexibility to permit the student to pursue a university-approved minor in addition to the selected area of concentration. All forestry students are required to attend eight weeks of field courses during the spring semester of the junior year. For students to attend spring camp, they must be pursuing a degree in forestry and be in good academic standing in the College of Agriculture.

The educational program in forestry leading to the first professional degree, the Bachelor of Science in Forestry (B.S.F.), is accredited by the Society of American Foresters (SAF). SAF is the specialized accrediting body recognized by the Commission on Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation as the accrediting agency for forestry in the U.S.

All students in wildlife and fisheries take a core of courses and must choose one of four areas of concentration: aquaculture, fish and wildlife conservation, fisheries, or wildlife. The curriculum is designed to prepare students for professional careers as wildlife and fisheries biologists and for graduate study in wildlife and fisheries; it provides the educational requirements for graduates to be certified by the Wildlife Society or the American Fisheries Society. Job opportunities for graduates of both curricula exist in private industry and state and federal agencies.

Transportation for field trips is provided by the University but financed by the students. Field fees vary in amount, based on the cost of transportation, and are paid at the time of other University fees through the Advanced Billing System.

CURRICULUM IN FORESTRY (FOREST MANAGEMENT)

TOTAL SEM. HRS. - 134

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Forestry degree include completion of at least 134 semester hours with a grade-point average of 2.00 or above on all work taken, except those courses for which grades of "P," "W," or "I" are recorded.

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 1201, 1208 and1402

8

Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212

8

English 1002

3

Forestry 1001 or Fisheries 1001 or Wildlife 1001

2-3

Mathematics 1020/1021 and 1431 or 1550

6-8

General education arts course

3

General education humanities course

3

 

33-36

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Agronomy 2051

4

Experimental Statistics 2201

4

Experimental Statistics 2000

3

Forestry 2001, 2011

5

Speech Communication 2060

3

General education social sciences

3

Area of concentration courses

12

 

34

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Economics 2030

3

English 3002

3

Forestry 3002, 3003, 3004, 3061

14

Forestry 3034, 3036, 3037

5

Forestry 3038, 3039, 3040,

3

General education humanities course

3

Area of concentration course

3

 

34

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Forestry 4032, 4036, 4039

10

Entomology/Plant Health 4018

4

Electives

3-0

Area of concentration courses

16

 

33-30

 

Areas of Concentration

A list of approved electives is available from the school.

> Ecosystem Management

Required Courses (31 hrs.)—AGEC 3503; restricted electives from taxonomy, management, and law/policy areas (13 hrs.); approved electives (15 hrs.).

> Forest Management

Required Courses (31 hrs.)—FOR 2043, 4021, 4034, 4038; WILD 4035; approved electives (14 hrs.).

CURRICULUM IN WILDLIFE AND FISHERIES

Approved electives must be in an area of concentrated study and be selected with approval of a designated faculty counselor; may include credit for basic ROTC.

TOTAL SEM. HRS. - 128

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 1201, 1208, and 1402

8

Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212

8

English 1000/1001, 1002

6

Mathematics 1020/1021, 1022

6

Elective

4

 

32

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 1502, 1509

4

Chemistry 2060* or 2261* or Physics 2001

3

Economics 2030 or AGEC 2003

3

General education arts course

3

General education social sciences course

3

Speech Communication 2060

3

Mathematics 1431

3

Approved electives

3

Area of concentration courses

7

 

32

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 2153 or 3040 and 3041

4

Biological Sciences 4253, 4254 or Forestry 3061

3-4

English 3002 or 2002 or FISH 4002

3

Experimental Statistics 2201 or 4001

4

Approved electives

3-2

General education humanities courses

6

Area of concentration courses

9

 

32

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 4020, 4041, or 4055

3-4

Electives

5

Area of concentration courses

7-18

Approved electives

17-5

 

32

*Students in the fisheries area of concentration must take chemistry 2060 or 2261.

Areas of Concentration

A list of approved electives is available from the school.

> Aquaculture

Required Courses (18 hrs.)—AGRO 2051; FISH 2001, 4021, 4022, and 4145; select one course (3 hrs.) from the following: AGEC 1003, 3303, or 3503; and select either (3 hrs.): BE 2307 or CE 2500 and 2510.

> Fisheries

Required Courses (23 hrs.)—FISH 2001, 4021, 4023, 4039, 4040, 4145; PHYS 2001.

> Fish and Wildlife Conservation

Required Courses (26-28 hrs.)—ENVS 1000, 2144; FISH 4021; select one course (3 hrs.) from: AGEC 3503, FOR 4039, or WILD 4050; select one course (3-4 hrs) from: FISH 4040, or WILD 4045 and 4046; select three courses (11-12 hrs.) from the following: BIOL 4141, 4142, 4146; FISH 4039, 4145; WILD 3018.

> Wildlife

Required Courses (20 hrs.)—AGRO 2051; FOR 2001; WILD 2031, 4011, 4045, 4046, and 4050; select either (3 hrs.): BE 2307 or CE 2500 and CE 2510; select two courses (8 hrs.) from the following: BIOL 4141, 4142, 4146, or WILD 3018, and three credits (3 hrs.) of policy, administration, or law. A list of approved courses is available at the College of Agriculture or the School of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries.

> Three-Plus-One

Required Courses—BIOL 2083 or CHEM 2262, 2264; FOR 2001; BIOL 2051; PHYS 2001, 2002 as electives and WILD 4013 or 4035 as approved electives. The required first-year veterinary medicine courses (39 hrs. used as approved electives) will fulfill the B.S. degree requirement.

Students preparing to enter the School of Veterinary Medicine are invited to enroll in the "three-plus-one" program between the School of Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries and the School of Veterinary Medicine. In this program, students spend three years in the wildlife-veterinary medicine area of concentrated study, after which they are eligible to apply for admission to the School of Veterinary Medicine. Students will be awarded the B.S. degree concurrently with the awarding of the D.V.M. degree. No student in this program can receive the B.S. degree in wildlife and fisheries until the D.V.M. degree has been awarded.

Students pursuing this program will be required to establish residence in the College of Agriculture for 30 semester hours prior to entering the School of Veterinary Medicine. They also must make application for the degree through the dean's office in the College of Agriculture no later than 15 days after classes begin in the semester in which the degree is to be awarded.

SCHOOL OF HUMAN ECOLOGY
INTERIM DIRECTOR - Cross, Professor
OFFICE - 125 Human Ecology Building
TELEPHONE - 225/388-2281
FAX - 225/388-2697

PROFESSORS EMERITI - Clark, Engebretson, Hildreth, Kelley, Leonard, Nolen, Younathan
PROFESSORS - Belleau, Burts, Cross, Draughn, Godber, Hegsted, Howat, Hwang, Lawrence, Monroe, Negulescu, Pierce, Summers
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS - Garrison, Keenan, J. Kuttruff, O’Neil, Ott
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS - Benedict, Chen
INSTRUCTORS - Bourgeois, Marquette, Myhand, Puls, Rabalais, Sanders
ADJUNCT FACULTY - Bruin, Buchanan, Carter, Collier, Dawkins, Greenway, C. Kuttruff, Melton, Overstreet, Reames, Reichel, Ryan, Tandberg, Truett, Tulley, Wasike, Wilson, Windhauser

CURRICULA:

Dietetics
Family, Child, and Consumer Sciences
Textiles, Apparel, & Merchandising

The School of Human Ecology offers undergraduate and graduate programs to prepare students for professional careers in the specialty areas.

The following undergraduate curricula are offered: dietetics; family, child, and consumer sciences (human services management, consumer sciences, nursery school and kindergarten teaching concentrations); and textiles, apparel, and merchandising. The School participates in the nutrition, food, and culinary science curriculum with the Department of Food Science (See Food Science). Students selecting the premedical concentration are in the School of Human Ecology. Each curriculum provides the student with a concentrated professional sequence in an area of specialization, the necessary supporting courses in basic sciences and/or arts, and a broad general education. Professional areas supporting certification requirements for nursery school and kindergarten teaching are listed as part of the curriculum in family, child, and consumer sciences.

All undergraduate programs are fully accredited by the Council for Professional Development of the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences. In addition, specialized accreditation and/or program approval is offered by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, the American Dietetic Association, and the Association of Financial Counseling and Planning Education.

Graduates are prepared to pursue professional careers in such areas as dietetics, medicine, public health, human services, cooperative extension service, business, education, research, retailing, apparel and textile industries, and international service. Human ecology programs, research, and service focus on the family as a system and the interaction of families and individuals in their near and global environments.

See also the curriculum in nutrition, food, and culinary sciences, which includes a premedical/nutrition area of concentration for students planning on medical school or advanced degree programs in nutrition. The culinary area of concentration in nutrition, food, and culinary sciences prepares students for work in the food industry.

CURRICULUM IN DIETETICS

TOTAL SEM. HRS. - 128

This curriculum is currently accredited as a Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) by the Commission on Accreditation/Approval for Dietetics Education of the American Dietetic Association (ADA), a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation and the United States Department of Education. Students who complete this curriculum with a gpa of 3.00 or better in all human ecology courses (HUEC), including at least four 3000- to 4000-level courses taken in residence, will receive a DPD Verification Statement which allows the student to apply for an ADA professional practice program.

By successfully completing a professional practice program, the graduate of this degree program qualifies to take the registry examination to become a registered dietician. Dietitians provide expertise in nutrition and food service management in a variety of settings, including public and private schools, universities, hospitals, clinics, care centers, the armed services, research laboratories, commercial and industrial establishments, and local, state, and federal health programs.

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 1011, 1012

4

Chemistry 1201, 1202, 1212

8

English 1000/1001, 1002

6

Human Ecology 1000

3

Mathematics 1020/1021, 1022 or 1023, 1431

6-8

Speech Communication 2060

3

General education arts course

3

Electives

2-0

 

35

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Accounting 2000 or 2001

3

Biological Sciences 2160

3

Chemistry 2060 or 2261, 2262

3-6

Experimental Statistics 2201 or Sociology 2201

4

Human Ecology 2010, 2012, 2014, 2018, 2021

14

Sociology 2001 or Anthropology 1003

3

Electives

3-0

 

33

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Biological Sciences 2083

3

Human Ecology 3012, 3015, 3016, 3019, 3021

15

Management 3200 or Psychology 3050

3

Psychology 2000 or 2004

3

General education humanities courses

6

Electives

3

 

33

 
 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Human Ecology 4010, 4011, 4013, 4014, 4017, 4020, 4021, 4023

18

English 3002

3

Electives

6

 

27

 

CURRICULUM IN FAMILY, CHILD, AND CONSUMER SCIENCES

TOTAL SEM. HRS. - 128-130

Students completing this curriculum are eligible to apply for positions in government or the private sector relating to administration and management of family services programs, management of family resources, consumer economics, and nursery school and kindergarten teaching. Employment opportunities exist in business, cooperative extension, education, programs for the elderly, consumer agencies, media, and federal, state, and local government.

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Anthropology 1003

3

English 1000 or 1001 or 1004

3

English 1002 or 1003 or 1005

3

Human Ecology 1000,* 1010*

6

Mathematics 1020 or 1021

3

Mathematics 1022, 1100, or 1431#

3

Biological Sciences 1001

3

Approved general education natural sciences courses

6

Approved general education art course*%

3

 

33

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Economics 2030

3

Approved general education humanities courses (English courses only)

6

Speech Communication 2010,* 2040,* 2060,* 2063* or 2862*

3

Human Ecology 2065*

3

Human Ecology 2014* or Sociology 2211

3-4

Psychology 2000, 2004, 2040, or 2060

3

Sociology 2001

3

Area of concentration courses

7-6

 

31

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Human Ecology 3054,*† 3070*

6

Human Ecology 3090*

1

Human Ecology 3060, 3061, and 3062; or EDCI 2030,*† and 3200 *†

9

Area of concentration courses

12-15

Electives

6-3

 

34

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Human Ecology 4050,* 4052*

6

Human Ecology 4067 or HUEC/EDCI 4058*† and Human Ecology 4059*†

6-10

Human Ecology 4066 or 4056*†

3

Area of concentration courses

9

Electives

6-4

 

30-32

Areas of Concentration

> Human Services Management

Required Courses (31 hrs): EXED 4025, 4026, or VED 4504; EXST 2201 or SOCL 2201; HUEC 3053, 4051, 4064; MGT 3200; POLI 2070; PSYC 4072; SOCL 4511; SOCL 3501 or 3601, or SW 3002 or 3007.

> Consumer Science

Required Courses (27-28 hrs.): ACCT 2000# or 2001#; ISDS 2000, # EXST 2201,# or SOCL 2201; ECON 2035# or approved elective; ACCT 2101# or approved elective; MKT 3401# and 3411; FIN 3715,# MGT 3211, EXST 3001, or FIN 3200 or 3201; MGT 3200;# POLI 2070.

Consumer Science students have the option of a minor in business administration. See the section on "Minor Field Requirements" in this chapter.

Courses marked with # are required for a minor in business administration in the College of Agriculture.

> Nursery School and Kindergarten Teaching

Required courses (31 hrs.): EDCI 3000;*† HIST 2055 or 2057; HIST 3071* or GEOG 4001;* HUEC 3053,*† HUEC/EDCI 4055,*† 4057;*† HUEC 4060;*† KIN 2601* and kinesiology electives; MUS 2170;* physical science elective.

For state certification in nursery school/kindergarten, students must earn a "C" or better in courses marked with asterisks (*). Due to stringent state certification requirements, it is the student's responsibility to seek advising on a yearly basis..

% Students in NS/KDG must select Art in general education arts elective for state certification requirements. Students in HSMGT and CNSUMR may select any course listed in the general education arts elective.

Students must have a 2.50 gpa and have passed the communication skills and general knowledge portions of the National Teacher Examination before taking courses marked with (†). Additionally, students must pass the required PRAXIS Examinations before they are eligible to apply for state certification.

CURRICULUM IN TEXTILES, APPAREL, AND MERCHANDISING

TOTAL SEM. HRS. - 128

To prepare future professional for careers in the textile and apparel industries which are interconnected and global in nature, this curriculum provides students with an integrated, multifunctional academic experience. Students focus on the design, development, and marketing of textile and apparel products and are encouraged to develop a broad-based problem-solving perspective through synthesis of concepts, course work, and work experiences. Students concentrate on a component of the textile/apparel industry complex by selecting textile science, apparel design and production, or merchandising as a program area. Graduates pursue careers with textile and apparel manufacturers, retailers, testing laboratories, government agencies, media firms, or open their own businesses.

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Human Ecology 1000

3

English 1000/1001, 1002

6

Mathematics 1020/1021

3

General education social sciences course

3

Area of concentration course

3

Art 1001, or 1011, or 1441, or 2401, or 2411, or 2470

3

Mathematics 1022,* or 1431,** or EXST 2201**

3-4

General education natural sciences sequence or CHEM 1201,* 1202*

6

General education natural sciences course or CHEM 1212*

2

Electives

3-2

 

35

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Accounting 2000 or 2001 or Mathematics 1550*

3-5

Economics 2030

3

Human Ecology 2032, 2037

8

Human Ecology 2040, 2041

4

Human Ecology 2045

3

General education humanities course

3

Area of concentration course

3

Speech Communication 2061 or English 2002 or 3002*

3

Electives

2-0

 

32

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Speech Communication 2060

3

General education humanities course

3

Area of concentration courses

9

Human Ecology 3032, 3034, 3041, 3045

12

Management 3200

3

Marketing 3401

3

 

33

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Approved electives

6

Area of concentration courses

3-8

Human Ecology 4030, 4034, 4045

9

Human Ecology 4047**

6-3

Electives

4-2

 

28

 

Areas of Concentration

> Textile Science (22 hrs.)

Required Courses—MATH 1552; CHEM 2001, 2002, 2261; PHYS 2001 or 2101; HUEC 4043; EXST 4001

> Apparel Design (20 hrs.)

Required Courses—ART 1847, 1848; HUEC 3037, 3230, 3232, 4037.

> Merchandising (18 hrs.)

Required Courses—MATH 1025; HUEC 3043, 4046, 4070; MGT 3320 or PSYC 3050; MC 2020 or MKT 3427.

SCHOOL OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
DIRECTOR - Burnett, Professor
OFFICE - 142 Old Forestry Building
TELEPHONE - 225/388-5748
FAX - 225/388-5755

H. C. SANDERS ENDOWED PROFESSOR - Verma
PROFESSORS EMERITI - Gassie, Leonard, McMurry, Pesson, Smith
PROFESSORS - Burnett, Harrison, Kotrlik, Richardson, Verma
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS - Holmes, Holton, Redmann, Trott
ASSISTANT PROFESSORS - Bates, Maddy-Bernstein

CURRICULUM:

Vocational Education

The curriculum in vocational education is offered with areas of concentration in adult, extension, and international education; agricultural education; business education; career development; home economics education; industrial education; and training and development. Master's and doctoral programs also are available. For additional information, see the Graduate Bulletin or contact the School of Vocational Education.

The State Board for Vocational Education has designated LSU as a teacher education center for the preparation of vocational teachers, making LSU eligible for Federal funds under the National Vocational Education Acts.

The School of Vocational Education is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and is a member of the University Council for Workforce and Human Resource Education, a national consortium of leading research universities.

Admission to the School

General Students - Students are eligible for admission to the school in accordance with admission and retention requirements prescribed by the College of Agriculture.

Students Seeking Teacher Certification - The teacher education program in Vocational Education is administered jointly by the Colleges of Agriculture and Education. Students are admitted to programs leading to certification in adult education, agricultural education, business education, home economics education, industrial education, and vocational trade and industrial education according to the following:

Students from other LSU senior colleges who have completed a minimum of 24 semester hours with a 2.20 grade-point average on all work taken are considered for provisional admission to the vocational teacher education program. For regular admission, students must have a 2.50 cumulative grade-point average and appropriate scores on the PRAXIS Examinations. Regular admission is required prior to enrollment in any 4000-level vocational education course.
Transfer students from accredited colleges and universities who have met the entrance requirements of the University, who are eligible for admission to a senior college, and who meet the requirements listed above will be considered for admission to the teacher education program.
Students on University scholastic and attendance probation will not be admitted to a teacher education program.

Requirements for Teacher Certification

Regular admission into a vocational teacher education program.
Attainment of senior standing in the College with an overall average of 2.50 on all work attempted at LSU, with no grade lower than "C" in professional education courses and in courses required in the teaching field, regardless of institution(s) attended.
Proficiency in English.
Completion of all methods courses.

Students also may complete standard certification requirements in adult education and vocational trade and industrial education. In addition, students may complete course work appropriate for the state alternative certification program.

Students interested in any program leading to teacher certification should contact the School of Vocational Education for application information, deadlines, and specific details about each program. Students interested in a teacher certification program other than those included here should contact the College of Education.

 

CURRICULUM IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

Students completing this curriculum are prepared for a wide range of employment options including adult, extension, and continuing education; training and development in business and industry; human resource development; teacher certification at the secondary level; and certification in postsecondary vocational trade and industrial education.

The curriculum offers the student an opportunity to select either of two paths:

General Student Path (Noncertification)
Teacher Certification Path

Students following either path will develop a 50-hour technical core in consultation with a faculty adviser.

Students interested in the study of training and development/human resource development should apply for the general student path. A special program of courses is available to prepare students for training and development careers in business, industry, and government. Students graduating from this program typically pursue careers in training and development, human resource development, training administration and consulting, classroom instruction, management development, career development, and technical training. While sharing some courses with the adult education emphasis, this program emphasizes the application of education methodologies in the workplace and the unique needs of business, industry, and government.

This path includes study in principles of adult education, principles of training and development, instructional design methodologies, training delivery, administration of training programs, educational psychology and workplace learning. Emphasis is placed on developing training professionals who have a variety of methodologies and skills to be able to respond to the diverse needs of the modern workplace. Students are also expected to develop a content specialization outside the training core as part of their program of study. The path includes sufficient flexibility for students to tailor the program to fit their career objectives. Students interested in this area should contact the School of Vocational Education prior to admission.

The path leading to Louisiana teacher certification prepares a student for certification in one of the previously mentioned areas of concentration. Although most of these graduates enter the teaching profession, experience has demonstrated that people who hold a state teaching certificate find employment in a wide variety of other related professions.

Courses marked with asterisks (*) are required for students who anticipate applying for teacher certification.

TOTAL SEM. HRS. - 135

FRESHMAN YEAR

SEM. HRS.

English 1000/1001, 1002

6

Mathematics 1020/1021, and any general education analytical reasoning course

6

General education natural sciences sequence

6

Technical core courses

12

Electives or ROTC, Kinesiology*

3

 

33

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

SEM. HRS.

General education arts course

3

General education humanities course, English*

3

General education natural sciences course

3

Experimental Statistics or approved computer related course

3

Vocational Education 2001*

3

Technical core courses

8

Electives or ROTC, Psychology 2060* and 2078*,History 2055/2057*, Kinesiology 2601*

10

 

33

 

JUNIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

Vocational Education 3200*

3

Economics 2030

3

General education humanities course, English*

3

Vocational Education 4601*

3

Technical core courses

18

Electives, Curriculum & Instruction 3136;* natural sciences course*

6

 

36

 

SENIOR YEAR

SEM. HRS.

General education social sciences course

3

General education humanities speech course

3

Vocational Education 4809 or 4200*

3

Vocational Education 4301*

3

Technical core courses, Vocational Education 4102*

12

Vocational Education 4801,*4802,* and 4803*

9

 

33

 

Areas of Concentration

> Adult, Extension, and International Education

Technical Core Courses—50 hrs.: 19 hours of approved courses chosen from EXED 4010, 4025, 4026; HEED 4464, 4869; VED 3602, 4105, 4601, 4704, 4705, 4809; 12 hours, including 6 hours from HUEC/SW and 6 hours from PSYC/SOCL chosen from HUEC 1010, 2010, 2014, 2065, 3012, 3016, 3053, 3054, 4050; SW 3002, 3003, 3007, 3008, 4005; PSYC 2000, 2040; SOCL 1001, 2001, 2351, 2501, 4551, 4701; 19 hours chosen from courses above or from agronomy, biological sciences, environmental studies, foreign languages, geography, horticulture, mass communication, kinesiology, political science, or speech communication.

The concentration in adult education prepares students for traditional, nontraditional, and nonformal educational careers in agencies and educational institutions. The focus is on training individuals to teach learners how to learn; on the transfer and application of learning; and on preparation for careers and vocations.

Extension and international education emphasizes work with youths/adults in organized and nonformal community settings. Courses focus on needs assessment, program design, presentation techniques, evaluation, and development of educational materials. A block of 50 technical hours to suit a student's specific goals, and an internship provide practical work experience in the chosen specialty.

> Agricultural Education

This concentration prepares students for teaching agricultural education in secondary schools, for working in agricultural business, and for serving as county extension agents. Course work is provided in various areas of agriculture, including plant and animal sciences, and agricultural economics.

Professional education is offered through courses in methods and techniques for training youth and adults.

Students complete a 50-hour technical core. Using an approved list of technical core courses, students develop a plan of study in consultation with a faculty adviser.

Students who anticipate entering the teacher certification program should inform the faculty adviser at the time the undergraduate program of study is being developed.

> Business Education

The business education concentration prepares students to become professionals in supervisory, management, and support personnel positions in modern office environments. Knowledge and skills are acquired in general office systems, information processing, computing, and communications. In addition, skills such as problem solving, decision making, and human relations are emphasized.

Career opportunities may be found in business, industry, education, and governmental agencies. Students complete a 50-hour technical core in business education, which may include course work in keyboarding, accounting, communications, management, marketing, finance, economics, shorthand, word processing, and data processing.

Using an approved list of technical core courses, students develop an individualized degree plan in consultation with a business education adviser. Students are encouraged to enroll in courses for certification in computer literacy (nine hours) and cooperative office education (six hours, plus a minimum of 1,500 hours of work experience in the business field).

Teaching minors in limited business education subjects also are offered. Business education advisers should be consulted for details.

 

> Career Development

Technical Core Courses—50 hours.:

19 hours chosen from BUED 2071; EXED 4025; INED 3602, 4849; VED 3602, 4301, 4704, 4705, 4890; 12 hours which must include 3 hours from economics, 3 hours from management, and 6 hours from psychology/sociology chosen from ECON 2035, 4020, 4140, 4210, 4220, 4230; MGT 3200, 3320, 3500, 4322, 4620; PSYC 2000, 3050; SOCL 2001, 2351, 4331, 4511, 4521; 19 hours chosen from courses above or from ELRC 4360, 4365, 4600, 4601; GEOG 1001, 1003, 2062; HUEC 4050; SPCM 2010; SW 3008, 4005.

The focus in career development is on goals of individuals and organizations and how each effectively meets the needs of the other. Through career planning, management, and development, the individual is given direction and purpose while present and future needs of the organization are also met.

Career development specialists help assess personal competencies and goals; identify, plan, and implement career actions; give counsel concerning the appropriate preparation for a given occupation; and explore career opportunities.

Students complete a block of 50 technical hours based on the student's specific career goal and an internship provides practical work experience in an organization.

> Home Economics Education

The home economics education concentration is designed to prepare individuals for employment opportunities in formal and informal educational institutions or in related educational pursuits in business, industry, the Cooperative Extension Service, and governmental agencies. Home economics education includes:

Broad-based studies of topics including textiles and apparel; human food and nutrition; family relationships; child development; housing equipment and furnishings; resource management and consumer economics.
Professional education with early and continuing field experiences in areas of educational and adolescent psychology; presentation skills; instructional techniques; management of the learning environment; principles of vocational education; and a professional internship.

Louisiana teacher certification is granted in one or both of the following areas: vocational home economics, focused on helping people improve the quality of life; and occupational home economics, focused on developing skills and knowledge for employment in service areas related to food, child care, housing and design, and institutional management. Certification in occupational home economics requires work experience and a specific program of study. An ancillary certification is available for those holding related degrees. Students who anticipate applying for entry into teacher certification should inform the faculty adviser so that appropriate technical requirements can be included in the degree plan.

A degree plan consisting of a 50-hour core will be developed from an approved list of technical courses related to home economics.

> Industrial Education

The concentration in industrial education provides students with the training, supervision, and administrative development needed for service in industry and education; provides professional preparation and certification for vocational-technical teachers; and develops the skills of elementary and secondary school teachers in this area.

Students complete a 50-hour technical core. Using an approved list of technical core courses, students develop a plan of study in consultation with a faculty adviser.

Students who anticipate entering the teacher certification program should inform the faculty adviser at the time the undergraduate program of study is being developed.

> Training and Development

Technical Core Courses—50 hours:

Required courses (7 hours): EXST 2201; MGT 4620; 19 hours chosen from INED 3062, 4849, 4809; VED 3602, 4809; and 3 hours from ELRC 4365; SPCM 2010, 2060, 2061, 2064; 21 hours of approved electives from business education; educational leadership, research, and counseling; industrial education, speech communication, vocational education; instructional path to include at least 9 hours chosen from BUED 2071, 4252; ELRC 4501, 4507; INED 3055; SPCM 2010, 2061, 4104, 4119, 4160; VED 3055, 4464, 4601, 4704; noninstructional path to include 15 hours from BUED 2071; ELRC 4501, 4507; INED 3055; MC 3000, 3030; MKT3401, 3421; SOCL 4311, 4411; VED 3601, 4464, 4704, 4705.

This concentration prepares students for human resource training and careers in business, industry, and government. Courses will focus on transferring knowledge about current theories and research into practical applications. Graduates will be prepared for careers including training and development, human resource development, training administration, classroom instruction, training consulting, management development, technical training, and career development. Those interested in teaching may emphasize an instructional path, while others may choose a noninstructional path, such as program design or administration and management. The concentration emphasizes the application of education methodologies in the work place, as well as the unique needs of business, industry, and government. Strong emphasis is placed on using educational strategies to achieve organizational goals. There will be involvement with professional practitioners of training and career development and practical field experiences. This concentration includes study of the principles of training and development, instructional design methodologies, needs assessment, evaluation methods, administration of training programs, and work place learning.

 

LSU HOME

Academic Affairs Home