Research Fellows

William B. Bankston, Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology
Louisiana State University

William B. Bankston is Professor of Sociology. His primary research interest has been the relationship of cultural and structural elements to levels of lethal violence. His most recent work has focused on the determinants of variation in the ratio of female to male spouse killings across social units, and on socially disruptive effects (including crime and violence) in communities experiencing rapid economic expansion and contraction.

Sara Becker
Assistant Professor of Sociology
Louisiana State University
Juan J. Barthelemy, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Social Work
Louisiana State University

Juan J. Barthelemy is an Assistant Professor of Social Work at Louisiana State University. His areas of research are adolescent aggression and school violence. His work has appeared in the Handbook of Violence. His main research project at this time is a longitudinal study looking at adolescent aggression and personality factors as predictors of academic success.

Troy C. Blanchard, Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology
Louisiana State University

Troy C. Blanchard is a Professor in Sociology. His research interests include demography, social inequality, religion, and criminology. His recent work examines the link between local religious environments and social demographic outcomes, such as residential segregation and community health. In addition, his research is supported via a number of competitive grants from the National Science Foundation and the USDA Nation Research Initiative. Dr. Blanchard also maintains an active applied social science research agenda in the areas of demographic and socioeconomic analysis, as well as evaluation research. He recently completed a series of population projections for Louisiana Parishes. He has also issued numerous press releases on Louisiana population dynamics (such as populations change, in-migration, out-migration, poverty, and crime) that have been covered by a variety of national and statewide media sources.

Donald 'Larry' Crumbley, Ph.D., CPA, CFD, CR.FA
Professor of Accounting
KPMG Peat Marwick Endowed Professorship #1
Louisiana State University

Dr. Larry Crumbley is a renowned forensic accountant and is the author or co-author of at least 50 books and contributor of numerous articles to a variety of outlets. He is listed in Who's Who in America and has won several research grants, including the Arthur Young Research Grant.

Thomas J. Durant, Jr., Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology and African American Studies
Louisiana State University

Thomas J. Durant, Jr. is a native of Mansfield, Louisiana. He earned the doctorate in sociology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, the master’s degree in agricultural education at Tuskegee University, and the bachelor’s degree in animal science at Grambling State University. His current position is Professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, where he has been employed for 30 years. He is the former Director of African and African American Studies at Louisiana State University. His teaching and research interests include southern culture, ethnic studies, African and African American studies, criminology, criminal justice, gerontology, and international studies.

Craig Forsyth, Ph.D.
Professor Sociology and Criminal Justice
University of Louisiana, Lafayette

Craig J. Forsyth is Professor Sociology and Criminal Justice Justice at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette. He is also Department Head of Criminal Justice. He received his Ph.D. from Louisiana State University in 1983. He is a former President of the Mid-South Sociological Association. Dr. Forsyth is the author of The American Merchant Seaman and His Industry: Struggle and Stigma, (New York: Taylor & Francis, 1989) and a co-author of Caught In The Net: Conflict Between Shrimpers And Conservationists, (College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1996). He is also the author of over 150 journal articles and book chapters. Since 1988, Dr. Forsyth has worked as a defense mitigation expert in First Degree Murder cases in Louisiana. To date he has worked on over 300 capital murder and other criminal cases. In that capacity he does an extensive social history of each defendant. His principal research interests are in the areas of crime and deviance, the maritime industry, and the broad interface of family, work, and social change. He is currently involved in a grant funded by Minerals Management Service which is examining the relationship between offshore development and social capital in St. Mary Parish, and is also the editor of the journal Deviant Behavior.

James C. Garand, Ph.D.
Emogene Pliner Distinguished Professor in Political Science
Louisiana State University

James C. Garand (Ph.D., University of Kentucky, 1984) is the Emogene Pliner Distinguished Professor in Political Science. Professor Garand has teaching and research interests in the fields of legislative politics, electoral politics, public policy (including crime policy), state politics, bureaucratic politics, the American presidency, domestic political economy, and methodology and statistics. His research on a wide range of topics in American politics has been published in numerous journals, including the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, British Journal of Political Science, Political Research Quarterly , Western Political Quarterly, Comparative Political Studies, American Politics Research (formerly American Politics Quarterly), Public Choice, Social Science Quarterly, and Legislative Studies Quarterly. His coedited book, Before the Vote: Forecasting American National Elections, was published by Sage Publications in 2000.

Kirby Goidel, Ph.D.
Professor of Mass Communication and Political Science
Louisiana State University

Kirby Goidel is a full professor with a joint appointment to Mass Communication and Political Science, and is the Chairman of the Public Policy Research lab. He joined the faculty of the Manship School in August 2002 as the Director of Public Policy Research. He earned his doctorate at the University of Kentucky in 1993 and has taught previously at the University of Lousiana at Lafayette and Indiana State University, where he also served as Chair of the Department of Political Science and worked as an editorial columnist for the Terre Haute Tribune-Star. His research interests include political participation, elections and campaign finance, public opinion, and the media and politics.

Cecile Guin, Ph.D., LCSW
Director of The Office of Social Service Research and Development
Louisiana State University

Cecile C. Guin, Ph.D., LCSW is the Director of the Office of Social Service Research and Development (OSSRD) with the LSU School of Social Work. She is a licensed social worker and obtained her doctorate at the University of Texas in Arlington in 1991. She is an expert in delinquency development and adult criminality and focuses her efforts on research into pathways to criminality. Dr. Guin conducts extensive criminological life history investigations for persons facing death penalty trials and post conviction appeals.

Stacia Haynie, Ph.D.
J.W. Annison, Jr. Family Alumni Professor of Political Science
Louisiana State University

*Research Interests*: With support from NSF, Dr. Haynie, along with C. Neal Tate, Vanderbilt; Reginald Sheehan, Michigan State University; Donald Songer, University of South Carolina, is creating an eleven-country appellate courts data set.

*Notable Activities*: Dr. Haynie conducted field research in South Africa in 2003 interviewing Justices of the South African Constitutional Court, Judges of the Supreme Court of Appeal, journalists, advocates and lawyers.

Samuel C. Hyde Jr. , Ph.D.
Leon Ford Endowed Chair in Regional Studies and Professor of History
Southeast Louisiana University

Professor Hyde is the Leon Ford Endowed Chair in Regional Studies, Professor of History, and the Director of the Center for Southeast Louisiana Studies at Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond, LA. He received his Ph.D. in History from Louisiana State University in 1992, where he was awarded College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Dissertation Award. He is the author of Pistols and Politics: the Dilemma of Democracy in Louisiana’s Florida Parishes, 1810-1899, and is the editor of several volumes relating to Southern regional history, including A Fierce and Fractious Frontier: The Curious Development of Louisiana’s Florida Parishes, 1699-2000, as well as numerous journal articles.

Sean M. Lane, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Psychology
Louisiana State University

Sean M. Lane is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Co-Director of the Office of Applied Cognition (http://www.lsu.edu/psychology/oac/index.htm). His research interest is in the area of eyewitness memory. His work examines how the memories of witnesses are affected by misleading post-event information (eyewitness suggestibility) and explores possible ways of reducing the errors that result from this exposure. In addition, he has recently done research on the beliefs held by judges and jurors about eyewitness memory, and the correspondence between these expressed beliefs and the ability to evaluate eyewitness testimony. He has also been active in promoting the use of research-based guidelines for collecting eyewitness evidence and has collaborated in this endeavor with faculty from the LSU Law School as well as judges, prosecutors, and law enforcement personnel in Southern Louisiana.

Matthew R. Lee, Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology
Louisiana State University

Matthew R. Lee is a Professor of Sociology at Louisiana State University and Co-Coordinator of CAPER with Edward Shihadeh. His areas of research are macro-criminology and violence. His research has appeared in such journals as Social Forces, The Sociological Quarterly, Criminology, Justice Quarterly, and various other sociological and criminological journals. His main research project at this time is a five year study of rural community crime rates, funded by a National Science Foundation CAREER grant.

Michael Leitner, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Geography
Louisiana State University

Michael Leitner is Associate Professor in the Department of Geography and Anthropology at LSU. His major research and teaching interests are in Computer Cartography, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and Spatial Statistics. He also teaches a class titled "Crime Mapping and Modeling" in the new Forensic Sciences graduate program at LSU. His specific research interests are in spatial crime analysis, especially in geographic profiling of serial offenders and in the visualization of confidential data (e.g., crime and health-related data) on maps.

Mary H. Manhein, Director of LSU FACES Laboratory
Instructor of Anthropology
Louisiana State University

Mary H. Manhein holds an MA in anthropology and has over 19 years experience as a forensic anthropologist. She is the director of the FACES Lab and also an instructor at LSU. Manhein has handled more than 600 forensic cases and is called on by law enforcement agencies all over the U.S. Manhein is a Fellow in the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and is the author of The Bone Lady: Life as a Forensic Anthropologist.

Marc Riedel, Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice
Southeast Louisiana University

Marc Riedel is currently Professor of Sociology at Southeastern Louisiana University and Emeritus Professor at Southern Illinois University. Dr. Riedel received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1972. He is the author/editor of ten books and numerous articles and book chapters. His research has been cited in two U.S. Supreme Court decisions and in numerous law reviews and journals. He was elected an Executive Counselor and Vice-President of the American Society of Criminology. In 1985, he received the prestigious Herbert Bloch Award from the American Society of Criminology for outstanding service to the discipline and the field.

Edward Shihadeh, Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology
Louisiana State University

Edward Shihadeh is the Director of Graduate Studies and Professor in the Department of Sociology at the Louisiana State University. His primary research interests lie in the structural predictors of crime. In particular, his research examines how urban rates of crime are related to segregation and the concentration of poverty in Black and Latino communities. He is also examining how individual's network structure influences their fear of crime.

Wesley Shrum, Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology
Louisiana State University

Wesley Shrum is Professor of Sociology at Louisiana State University and secretary of the Society for Social Studies of Science. His primary research interests are science and technology in Africa and Asia, the role of the Internet in the globalization of science, and the development of new digital video methodologies.

Ginger D. Stevenson, Ph.D.
Instructor of Sociology
Louisiana State University

Ginger D. Stevenson is an Instructor in the Department of Sociology, and Coordinator of Undergraduate Activities and Organizations. Her areas of research and teaching interest are macro-criminology, violence, and gender and victimization. In the past, she has participated in the evaluation of drug court programs in Mississippi, and has published policy briefs and fact sheets on health and educational issues for the Mississippi Health Policy Research Institute, part of the Social Science Research Center at Mississippi State University.

Justine E. Tinkler, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Sociology
Louisiana State University

Justine Tinkler is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Louisiana State University. Her research is unified by an attention to the micro-level processes that create and reinforce race and gender inequality in institutions. Her recent work focuses on the legal system and examines resistance to laws designed to reduce inequality.

Frederick D. Weil, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology
Louisiana State University

Dr. Weil's personal website can be found here.